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  1. #26
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    I wonder what way the winds tend to blow on the way to the south pole. I could not figure any normal way on my 2 minute internet search.
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  2. #27
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    The winds are very strong and a huge factor in planning this expedition - hence the aerodynamic shape to the panniers. The wind is generally a headwind, blowing from the polar plateau in the middle of the continent toward the coasts (in other words the wind blows to the north pretty much everywhere). The pole is around 9000ft above sea level, and as cold air pools in the center of the continent, it begins to slide downhill to the coast - with nothing to stop it.

    If Eric makes it to the pole in good time, he plans to turn around and return, which should be somewhat easier (downhill, with the wind).

    Check this video from one of his previous antarctica expeditions, and you'll get a pretty good idea of the wind...

    SouthPole STP2010 06 - YouTube
    Last edited by timhMN; 12-07-2012 at 10:19 AM.

  3. #28
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    Thanks for the info and link Tim. That is kind of what I found also. So up hill and against the wind to the south pole. With some of the snow contours in the video, the head wind, and cold feet I bet there will be a lot of pushing. Or as someone here said once "you aren't fat biking if your not pushing." The bike bags look great but wonder how they are with pushing. Not many other options I guess. I am very excited to follow this trip.
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  4. #29
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    Quick update: After a couple of hectic days of packing all kinds of crazy stuff, getting things organized, tested, fixed, replaced, tweaked, altered or otherwise dialed in, Eric is on the way to Chile.

    I'm traveling with him as far as Punta Arenas, mostly providing gear and technology support. I'm currently in an airport waiting for a flight to Miami, then from there is santiago then on to punta. In punta its major bike build up again and final gear location test and fit.

    Follow along on twitter by searching #cyclesouth or @elexplore, and on facebook https://www.facebook.com/EricLarsenExplore

    more soon...

  5. #30
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    The moonlander is being loaded on the plane to antarctica right now!

  6. #31
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    Yeah!!! This is exciting!

  7. #32
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    Eric and the moonlander have arrived safely to base camp at union glacier in Antarctica. The current plan is for him to unpack gear and finish the final prep of the bike today, then do some test riding and load balancing tomorrow and a possible drop off at the official expedition start (Hercules Inlet) on Wednesday.

    The last week has been very intense with prep and getting the bike ready. To get it down here to Punta Arenas, Chile the bike had to be almost completely dissassembled. Some of that was for space / weight reasons, and some was because we wanted to provide extra protection for certain parts (specifically the wheels and tires). I wanted to be able to post photos of the bike in "expedition mode" but it hasn't been completely together even yet (the drive train is off for the cargo plane transport).

    So the bike prep included repacking all the bearings and wheels with a light coat of teflon grease that has a -65F rating. Wheels and tires were separated for transport, and the rear der removed. We just didn't want the chance of it breaking (though a spare is along to the start, but is being left behind at base camp). Once we arrived in Punta, out hotel room at the Condor became a bike shop. Anyone that has prepped for a race like the Arrowhead or Ididasport knows the work that goes into a fatbike before a big adventure. We fitted the racks, mated the Bud and Lou's to the rims, removed the rear brake, added three fixed camera mounts, a compass mount, and a host of smaller things.

    After that, I worked on the panniers that were sent by granite gear special for this expedition. Right before we left for south america Eric had the idea of adding a few extra d-rings to the backs of the panniers to not only add some tie off points for cords, but also to have the ability to lash the pannier to the rack in the event a main hanger (plastic) cracks or breaks. The extra tie offs actually make the main hangers unnecessary, though its not as convenient way to handle the panniers. Generally speaking, some of the gear will be in the panniers all the time, and the panniers will remain on the bike all the time.

    We test loaded the bike with 10 days of food (smaller than you might think), and a rough stab at what a full load would be. While heavy, we both estimated it was still under 100 pounds total bike weight. We were not actually able to weigh it, however.

    One idea i had for him in regard to getting this vehicle rolling was to always start off going down wind, then making a loop back around into the wind, rather than trying to start from 0 with a headwind. An interesting part of this trip will be to see what sort of daily system Eric is able to work out to deal with these specific antarctica challenges.

  8. #33
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    Thanks or the updates.. We'd love to see some pics when poss.. Is it all being filmed for tv or a DVD?

    DJ

  9. #34
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    Wow, this fatbike expedition seems to be the complete opposite of another fatbike expedition that was announced here a while ago. This one is pretty awesome.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    Wow, this fatbike expedition seems to be the complete opposite of another fatbike expedition that was announced here a while ago. This one is pretty awesome.
    Yeah, in this one the bike will actually be ridden....
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  11. #36
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    Eric has been dropped at the expedition start point and is currently rolling across the ice at approx 4 mph. Tracking maps are here: Polar Explorer Eric Larsen

    Also note that Eric is carrying a Delorme inReach beacon that doing live tracking and reporting positions every 10 minutes. Zoom in on the middle map to see the track. The blue unit is the primary tracker. Next to the blue arrow, click the + symbol to see all the points, and click a point to see tracking info (speed, loc, heading, etc).
    Last edited by timhMN; 12-20-2012 at 07:21 AM.

  12. #37
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    I love the updates and will be continuing to follow this closely. I went to the link and kept zooming in on the satellite tracking image hoping to actually see him on his Moonlander knowing of course I could not.
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  13. #38
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    Great stuff, please keep up the updates!

    Cheers,
    Rob

  14. #39
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    massive respect for this guy...

    I would be dead in an hour if I tried something like this (lived in Central/South Texas all my life, seen snow twice)

  15. #40
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    Update for the day: The first day or two was known to be some of the hardest as Eric climbed out of Hercules Inlet and on to the continent. [As a side note, its hard to tell that he's actually over water except by looking at a map, the inlet is permanently frozen over. Visually it looks a lot like the rest of antarctica...] In this area there are crevasses that pose constant danger, as well as some of the highest winds. As the trip progresses, the temp will get colder but winds will hopefully moderate some.

    He pushed a lot yesterday, but today is mostly riding. I've seen the tracker report speeds as high as 9.7 kmh (6 mph) , which is pretty impressive for this rig. 4.5 mph has been more typical.

    Tracking maps are here: Polar Explorer Eric Larsen - note that the real time tracker (middle map) can be pretty addictive.

    Updates and SMS messages from the tracker will also be posted to facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/EricLarsenExplore

  16. #41
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  17. #42
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    Polar Explorer Eric Larsen

    Eric has abandoned the South Pole Expedition, electing to return to his base rather than risk an expensive extraction. Smart decision.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  18. #43
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    Too bad, enjoyed following the progress. Better to bail under your own power than being hauled out.

    Nice words about Ergodyne, I have worked with them for several years- top notch company for sure.
    Fatter than most.

  19. #44
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    WOW!!!!! Looks to be a wise part on the turn around. I am impressed none the less. WOW!!!

  20. #45
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    Given his expertise and accomplishments to date, if it was time to bail it was time to bail.

  21. #46
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    I think he's at least proved from his attempt that it is possible, but sounds like he'll have to greatly reduce his estimated daily milage to try again. He mentioned he was using food drops, so it makes sense that if he doubled the number of food drops and gave himself a couple more weeks, he could be successfull next time. I really enjoyed reading the blog posts! Makes me want to get a fat bike.

  22. #47
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    Impressive Feat

    Dude deserves some SERIOUS props! I could not even imagine such a trip. Good job!

  23. #48
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    Thanks everyone for the positive comments - i've passed a few of them on to Eric (who is feeling a bit low at the moment, obviously78./). It was of course a difficult decision for him, but the math wasn't working out. This first segment, the weather was about as good as he could have hoped for, so with the expectation of that not holding out, along with increased terrain difficulty ahead, most likely case was looking like a couple degrees short of the pole with the food and fuel he has available. That is an expensive extraction and dangerous for the pilots. Turning around now lets him get back under his own power.

    The mission now is to keep working on some photo and video aspects of the trip. After all, he's still riding a moonlander in the interior or antarctica! its all pretty dang cool... :-)

  24. #49
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    There is always next year.

    It's decent not to risk anyone else's life as would have happened with a desperate lunge for the Pole, and he's not going to lose anyone's respect by doing the right thing.

    To modify a phrase: "A fool and his life are soon parted".
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  25. #50
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    Being dropped off at the south pole and riding from there to the edge of Antarctica would have been good.. and maybe a better option.. Down hill and with a tail wind all the way.. Same ride but in reverse.

    DJ

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