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  1. #1
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    Moonlander and singletrack

    I ride my pug mainly on singletrack and love it, just wondering if anyone has had experience of a moonlander on singletrack? Any good?
    "Get busy living or get busy dying, that's god damn right"

  2. #2
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    I'd be interested in this as well as I have a Pugs with 3.7',s but the Neckromancer shares the same fork as the Moonlander so I was thinking of moving up to a fatter tire in front and I'm wondering what that would do to the handling in dry singletrack.

  3. #3
    Geordie biker
    Reputation: saltyman's Avatar
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    With a set of nates it would be good.....
    2014 cannondale badboy 9
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  4. #4
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    I've ridden my moonlander on dry and snow-covered singletrack. Even with the BFL's it does a great job. There's some funky self-steering occasionally and the BFL's will slip on an off-camber steep rock face. All part of the charm though. It trackstands like a 4-wheeler, so when you do have one of those rare slips when climbing, it's surprisingly easy to recover.

  5. #5
    Dr. Frost
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    I'm no fat bike specialist but I poached the snowshoe trails yesterday on a moonlander and it was slower than in summer on a "regular" bike but just as fun. Was impressed at the traction and float!

  6. #6
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    Hi gents, I just built up my Moonlander last night at the shoppe and I'm taking it out today for the first ride. No snow here in Chicagoland...What do you thing about dry weather tire pressure? How high should I go?

  7. #7
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    Go hard, could you report back?
    "Get busy living or get busy dying, that's god damn right"

  8. #8
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    I've been running 5.5 in front and 6 in the rear. Nothing but dry singletrack around here too.

    Just keep letting air out until it stops bouncing!

  9. #9
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    @Jsmilez how does it handle the singletrack. My pug just eats it up, its brilliant. Hence my enquiry about perforamnce in the dirt.

    Ta
    "Get busy living or get busy dying, that's god damn right"

  10. #10
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    Absolutely! I scour this forum everyday. That's why I eneded up ordering one. Luckly, I am tall so they had my size left. 22" woot!

  11. #11
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    It's awesome on singletrack. the only thing I have to worry about is making sure I can squeeze between the rocks with my 4.5" wide tires. New England has sharp chunks of granite everywhere; the BFL's are holding up great. It climbs easily in loose gravel and trackstands are super stable, so even if you do slip on a climb... it's likely you won't even drop a pedal. crazy fun!

  12. #12
    Geordie biker
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    I keep mine at 5-6psi, never bother adjusting pressures....just ride it everywhere.
    2014 cannondale badboy 9
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  13. #13
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    I love my ML on single track. It is slightly slower on some sections but faster on others because you can just float or plow right thru. I have been running 10psi but am going to drop to 8psi and compare.
    Trails still closed.
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  14. #14
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    I keep wondering about this... Not just with the Moonlander, but with the Pugsley as well. I see so many Pugsleys on Craigslist that have been ridden 5 or 6 times that people decide to get rid of, that I can't help but wonder why they give up on them so quickly? I don't know if it's because people order them online and wind up with the wrong sizing, if it's the economy causing people to have buyer's remorse because they don't use them as much as intended in the snow, if it's because their so specialized that people don't think they'll do well on singletrack, or if it's just that fatbikes don't live up to a lot of people's expectations. What do those of you that own fatbikes think? I'm really intrigued about building up a fatbike as a do-it-all, year round, off-road exploration, monster trucker, mountain/townie bike, but I don't want to take the plunge and wind up regretting it like so many people seem to do.
    Last edited by BoogieMang; 02-09-2012 at 08:20 AM.

  15. #15
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    it's probably all of the above...
    I was talking to a bike shop mechanic yesterday, he said one of his co-workers has a Pugsley that he really really wants to love, but doesn't. The example he gave was that they went out in the snow recently and he was blown away by some 29'ers. We haven't gotten much snow around here... 4" is the most we've seen since the Halloween weekend when we got about a foot. I can't imagine a 29'er having much trouble with 4" of light powder. It's a relatively slow bike that performs slower in snow, just like any other bike... It's certainly not a magic steed that will "float over anything." but it certainly DOES handle many conditions better than my FS 5" travel bike would. Will it consistently outperform your other bikes? probably not. will it be loads of fun to ride if you're okay with that. Absolutely!

  16. #16
    Nuts
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    Js pretty much nailed it. Where I really enjoy mine the most is it's ability not to need trails. I like going out on the frozen lakes and rivers where I can jump on snowmobile track and just go. I really enjoy being able to go out adventuring in the summer without the need for beat down trails. I commute on my Fatback daily and don't really care if it's the most efficient it brings smiles to my face plus it's a great workout. Is it the best for all jobs......nope but I would rather push my Fat Bike than ride another.
    And I love beer!!

  17. #17
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    There not for everyone, I wouldn't of bought my moonlander if I didn't have a good test of my pugsley first...I loved riding the pugs and almost cancelled my moony as I thought I didn't need another fatbike.

    I'm a naturally slower rider, I prefer to ride to the bikes own speed rather than push it to its limits, hence I don't bother adjusting pressures etc.....
    2014 cannondale badboy 9
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  18. #18
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    I enjojy my pugsley so much, that what has prompted my question. I get the whole fat bike thing and on my pug i love charging around the woods on the singletrack rooty/muddy/dusty woodland trails (i live in the Midlands UK) and vist the odd beach from time to time.

    I am never in a rush while riding as I enjoy the riding rather than racing around. I feel a new purchase could be being made sometime soon..
    "Get busy living or get busy dying, that's god damn right"

  19. #19
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    The shock factor of this thing is great. The guys at the shop couldn't get enough of it. I' m hoping to put 10-15 miles on it today.

  20. #20
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    The Fatbike is not the best: Road bike, single track, downhill, trails etc.
    It is however an all-around blast to ride do anything go anywhere within reason machine.
    It is unfortunate that (some) Bike Shops mislead a prospective customer into the wrong purchase for the wrong reason.
    You can find EVERY TYPE of bike hardly used on Craigslist or EBay.
    Although Fatbikes are relatively new, I actually have seen very few Fatbikes in comparison to the high end full suspension bikes some people buy and never ride.
    Moonlander's
    Sandman Hogger Ti

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoogieMang View Post
    I keep wondering about this... Not just with the Moonlander, but with the Pugsley as well. I see so many Pugsleys on Craigslist that have been ridden 5 or 6 times that people decide to get rid of, that I can't help but wonder why they give up on them so quickly? I don't know if it's because people order them online and wind up with the wrong sizing, if it's the economy causing people to have buyer's remorse because they don't use them as much as intended in the snow, if it's because their so specialized that people don't think they'll do well on singletrack, or if it's just that fatbikes don't live up to a lot of people's expectations. What do those of you that own fatbikes think? I'm really intrigued about building up a fatbike as a do-it-all, year round, off-road exploration, monster trucker, mountain/townie bike, but I don't want to take the plunge and wind up regretting it like so many people seem to do.
    With the Pugsley, it is likely one of the following:

    1. They feel weird at first. The steering is kinda "floppy" until you get used to it.
    2. They are HEAVY!. With every bike outlet focused on weight, the Pugsley will be totally anachronistic. This can be a turn-off for many. The focus on speed is kind of a corollary to this.
    3. They are extremely sensitive to tire pressure changes, and finding the right combo is pretty time-consuming. And most prefer an "automatic" experience when dealing with anything more complicated than a pair of shoes.
    4. And as someone mentioned, the weather. If we had last year's snow this year, more people would recognize the value.


    The thing to do now is snap these bargains up now, and sell them to a brand new set of rookies next Fall. Profit!
    Let the market decide!

    N42.58 W83.06

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by utabintarbo View Post
    The thing to do now is snap these bargains up now, and sell them to a brand new set of rookies next Fall. Profit!
    I would, but for some reason, I keep coming across people that seem to think they're rare and worth more than a new one

  23. #23
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    Mantastic, Maybe i could answer your question after riding daily on the Moonlander since Saturday, but it aint cheap ,
    Buy a Moonlander, then sell your pugsley and with some of the money you could get a 2nd wheel set built with 70 or 80mm rims and 3.7 Larrys (or nates) then you can have the lighter = faster and less squidgy wheelset for singletrack trails etc and the Hundies/BFLs for the beach or if we get it snow

    I did not bother trying to build a light fat bike and converted my karate monkey to semi fat with 47mm 29er rims and 2.55 WTB tyres, its ace for the Road work to the coastal sandy singletrack trails above the softer beach, as it is 3 bikes in use is going to be a lot to maintain
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  24. #24
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    things did not quite go as planned. I did some single track but it was only partially frozen. I did not want to tear up the trail, so a road a few miles and then went on some tame trails. 10psi is way to bouncy in the front. Rear wasn't too bad, but could use a few less psi. Trying 8 psi tomorrow. Riding rigid is so different. I'm used to full and front suspension.

  25. #25
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    kept it mostly clean
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Moonlander and singletrack-photo.jpg  


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