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  1. #1
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    Moonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic

    The Moonlander is in my top picks for a fatbike for this winter. I keep reading about the crank offset and how "odd" it is. I am unable to see it in person as my LBS only get them special order. I did take a Necro for a quick spin last year and I did not notice anything odd, but the Moonie does have a bigger offset.

    Would someone be kind enough to post a picture or two of the crank showing the offset. I'm thinking one looking down at the crank and the other from the front back. The picks on the Surly site don't seem to capture it.

    I would hate to put down a deposit only to get it and realize that it is too "odd" and awkward to pedal.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Anyone trolling this forum will tell you to go buy one they are the best thing since sliced bread. My two cents if it's even worth that is to ask around locally and find someone who has one and ask if you can take if for a spin. most on here though will tell you "once you go fat you don't go back." the crank arms are further apart and that bugs some people, but a few rides and you forget about that.
    "but you are a jerk, google it!" anonymous negative feedback 09-18-2012 09:07 AM Keep is positive folks!

  3. #3
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    I would ask around, but there are 5 fatbikes in my area: 2 necro, one pug and 2 9Zero7s. I have see them all . . . unfortunately no Moonies. :-(

  4. #4
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    Moonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic

    I have a ML. It's a non-issue

    Great bike...highly recommend.

  5. #5
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    Crank Offset?


    I’m not sure what you mean by “offset” here, but the Moonlander MWOD crank is symmetrical as far as the crank arms in relation to the BB shell are concerned, it is just wider. Compared to most 100mm snow cranksets the crank arms are about 5mm wider on each side.
    The cranks still sit evenly under your hips, they are just spread apart wider.

    The spider on the crank is pushed out so that the granny ring sits where the middle ring would and the middle ring sits where the big ring would and there is no ability to run a big ring. Maybe that's what you mean? That is hard to take a picture of.


    The rear end of the Moonlander is offset by 28 mm.

    This may help. http://surlybikes.com/uploads/downlo...Dimensions.PDF

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NLSpruce3 View Post
    I would ask around, but there are 5 fatbikes in my area: 2 necro, one pug and 2 9Zero7s. I have see them all . . . unfortunately no Moonies. :-(
    The Surly_Crankset_Dimensions.PDF shows a Pugs MWOD mid chainline at 72.4mm and a Moonie MWOD at 79.7mm. 7.3mm difference. Go ride a Pugs with your feet that much further out on the pedals than normal, and there you are.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  7. #7
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    Sure, it's different riding a bike with a wider BB, but i wouldn't call it "odd". After about 5 minutes you're over it, and looking for the next thing to ride over.

    I'd never ridden a fat bike prior to buying the Moonlander and it was just like riding any other bike for the first time. You've just got to get a feel for it.
    Klein Attitude XX
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  8. #8
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    I rode a Moonlander for about 15km, in heavy sand- dirt track for the first time on the weekend. (Big mistake, I want one).
    When I ride my regular bike I always find my right foot only sitting on 3/4 of the pedal.
    Moony fit perfectly with the wider pedals

  9. #9
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    Where do you live?

    I have a Moonie and I'm in Brabant - The Netherlands....;-)

    My experience is that the bigger q factor is a non issue. And I find it more awkward going back to a narrow q factor (a "normal" bike) after riding the Moonie for extended periods...

  10. #10
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    I found my Moonlander more comfortable than any of my normal crank width bikes. I had a back issue when I bought it. I realised that when standing straight up in a normal feet apart position, my feet were the same distance apart as when peddling the Moonie.

    Work by my chiropractor has sorted my back out and I can now ride my 29er without discomfort as well, but my Moonie is still the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden.

    Great bike, huge fun and very sociable when out riding.

    Brian

  11. #11
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    here's an older pic, maybe it's a bit useful


  12. #12
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    I was also a bit confused when I read about the offset things and cranks and whatnot. When I saw it in practice it was clear very quickly.

    - The cranks are not offset, they are just installed on a long spindle to clear the chainstays.
    - The "offset"-nomenclature with MWOD cranks means that the chainrings are moved outward in relation to the crank. Normally this is not possible, because a 104 mm BCD doesn't allow you to mount a small chainring. For regular cranks 30-31 teeth is the minimum for middle position, for MWOD the smallest middle chainring is 22 t.
    - The offset on the frame is most simply the cassette and hub moved 28 mm to the right, so the chain gets from the cassette to the chainring without hitting the rim and tire. Everything else just compensates for this: because the hub is not centered but the tire must be, the spokes are laced to one side of the rim. Chainstays are bent so the ends get to the hub.

    So the tires, cranks and everything are centered and symmetrical. The bike pedals and tracks just like any regular bike. Only the hub is moved to the right (with a few necessary changes) to get the chain past the tire. You don't notice any of this when you ride.

  13. #13
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    As far as the increased q factor goes, there are a number of people that have issues with this. I tend to think that it actually puts you in a more natural position compared to a narrow crank – look at how your feet are spaced naturally when you stand – but I did experience some problems last year when I tried to do a multi-day ride on my Moonlander having done all my riding leading up to that trip on a regular mtb. I would say it is something that some people need to get used to, most people are just fine, and then a few have had major issues with it.

    For those that can’t comfortably do the wider q factor, looking at a different style frame combined with narrower cranks and a 1x drivetrain might help. I’m out of the loop right now on what cranks are out or coming out and what will work with what frame though.

  14. #14
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    Flickr: The Surly Moonlander Pool - contains 266 pictures of moonlanders
    owner/raconteur at fat-bike.com

  15. #15
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    I got my Moonlander 2 weeks ago and have put about 200 miles on it- dont notice anything but awesome. I was developing some knee pain on my roadie but that has gone away since garaging it and only riding fat.

  16. #16
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    Ahhhhhhh !!! Ok. Now it make sense . . . I misunderstood the offset thing thinking one crank was further away from the frame than the other. Thanks for the picture Crafft. I can actually see how it would be more comfortable as the pedals are more "aligned" with a person's natural stance. Looking at the pdf, from outside of crank to outside of crank (where pedals attach) is 213mm . . . about 8.3 inches.

    Thanks a bunch everyone !

  17. #17
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    It seems some people have problems with a wide q factor, while others barely notice it, if at all. I was able to use a Moonlander for a few days from the shop I wrench at. The q factor was not an issue. I think what might be the factor in how comfortable it is, is the length of your legs.
    BTW, the Moonie I borrowed? It now has my name on it.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by marathon marke View Post
    It seems some people have problems with a wide q factor, while others barely notice it, if at all. I was able to use a Moonlander for a few days from the shop I wrench at. The q factor was not an issue. I think what might be the factor in how comfortable it is, is the length of your legs.
    BTW, the Moonie I borrowed? It now has my name on it.
    I have been riding track bikes and single speeds with very narrow Q-factors for a number of years. Im still not nearly as smooth pedaling the Pugs as I am on the single speed but comfort issues went away after a few rides. Probably if I didnt switch between the 2 so often I would smooth out my stroke on the fatbike.

    Craig

  19. #19
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    OP look at the smile on this guy's face. End of thread!

    Moonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic-2012-09-24-16.22.40.jpgMoonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic-img_2178.jpgMoonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic-img_2592.jpgMoonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic-2012-09-24-16.23.17.jpg

  20. #20
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    Just got my Moonie last week. Like someone said above, the bike is super comfortable. It pedals very efficiently for it's weight and also like other have said, it feels lighter than it actually is. Took it out on some single track this weekend. Can't wait to take it out on snow!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Moonlander Owners - I'm looking for a pic-moonie2.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    Just got my Moonie last week. Like someone said above, the bike is super comfortable. It pedals very efficiently for it's weight and also like other have said, it feels lighter than it actually is. Took it out on some single track this weekend. Can't wait to take it out on snow!
    Loving the new color and I'm mega-jelly of the stock Bud/Lou combo. Nates look too skinny on the ML!

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