Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 201 to 300 of 1100
  1. #201
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    thanks, velobike!

  2. #202
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    An UNCAGED BEAST has been loosed on nearby trails!
    For two nights in a row IT RAGED!
    Nary A clatter was heard, only UGH! oR GRRUMPH!
    The 32x22 is good for me. On easier, flatter trails the Beast ROCKED MY WORLD!
    The Beast has no gears, but the Beastrider does. BWAHAHA!
    Chainline frt. 75mm, rear 70mm cheated right 1washer and new big grippy washers on the rear hub- the stock ones slid on the paint. Stock chain, same length! Is it 1/8"? On-one Fleagle bar is wide for pullin and has little drops for tuckin down on the pavement. These Beasts ROLL! The coaster brake works fine, but You have to use both legs instedda one finger. Just hafta half-pedal every turn. Took me a half-hour to get used to it on a twisty trail. You can find the point of engagement and feather the coaster brake and not skid, even on steep downhills. Until You put the stock rear tire back on and HIT THE STREET! SCRRREEEEEEEEEEE!!!
    Last edited by dudeist; 05-03-2013 at 09:31 PM.

  3. #203
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    The stock chain is 1/8". I bought a 3/32" chain (lighter) designed specifically for SS that offers decreased side flex that I figured would work great. Apparently, it was not designed for a SS with such a ridiculous chain line as the Beast. It was too noisy, and therefore probably more likely to break. The original 1/8" chain was (slightly) quieter, and of course a normal 3/32" chain for geared bikes would have worked fine.

    But...

    My single speed chain ring (no shifting ramps or goofy teeth) showed up today, plus I figured out a way to add another 3mm spacer to the chain ring. So now my CL is only off by 4.5 mm. Tightest Beast chain line around I reckon, and it runs nice enough for my pickiness with the SS chain.

    I've changed many components on the bike, and think it turned out quite nice. Still may add graphics on the top tube. I will post pics when I get a chance.

  4. #204
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostQuick View Post
    The stock chain is 1/8". I bought a 3/32" chain (lighter) designed specifically for SS that offers decreased side flex that I figured would work great. Apparently, it was not designed for a SS with such a ridiculous chain line as the Beast. It was too noisy, and therefore probably more likely to break. The original 1/8" chain was (slightly) quieter, and of course a normal 3/32" chain for geared bikes would have worked fine...
    In the pre derailleur days we used to check chains by seeing how much side flex they had. If there was much we used to chuck them because the theory was that they were obviously worn out. That theory got destroyed by derailleur chains which you can almost tie in knots.

    I'd be using a derailleur chain rather than a singlespeed one where there was a large disparity in the chainline, so long as the cogs had proper single speed tooth profiles (ie not cut away).
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #205
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I'd be using a derailleur chain rather than a singlespeed one where there was a large disparity in the chainline, so long as the cogs had proper single speed tooth profiles (ie not cut away).
    This makes sense, and I agree. Problem was, I bought the chain before I knew about the CL issue. What manufacture would design a SS bike with such a horrible off set. Oops, never mind. Ya gets what you pay for.

    Now that I got the difference down to 4.5 mm, the chain seems workable.

  6. #206
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    I picked up some 7.1mm chainring spacers - except they were for INNER chainrings, and sized to fit the bolt rather than the "nut". Drilled 'em out with a 25/64" bit, and voila!

    I now have 34x21 mounted up, with a visually perfect chainline - and swapped the cast iron crank arms for aluminum, so the bike is at least 2 lbs lighter now.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  7. #207
    Custom User Title
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    154
    Since this is back near the top.....I finished drilling out my rear wheel, pulled the stock tubes and put in some 2.4-2.8 presta tubes, saved a bit of weight (tried using 2.25-2.35 and it blew out at about 2 miles, I walked a couple blocks to a local shop)...pulled the stock crankset and replaced it with the old square taper XT from my 1x1 with a 32t chainring, ran it with the stock 18, its was OK, tried a BMX 22t and it feels a little low and the chainline is really off....found a offset 20t cog and will swap that soon, I think its going to a good one.

  8. #208
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    Upgrades and Accessories Click for another disc adapter. Just in case the front canti's wear thru the rim, or get too icy in winter, or the rear coaster keeps taking 1/2 hour to get used to on each ride. I'm keeping this Beast, even if it becomes spare for "real" future fatty.
    Last edited by dudeist; 05-06-2013 at 08:23 AM.

  9. #209
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    the busetti mounts and a set of bb7s would be a nice upgrade. rats, i keep forgetting that i would need new hubs too. ppppbbbt.

  10. #210
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    the busetti mounts and a set of bb7s would be a nice upgrade. rats, i keep forgetting that i would need new hubs too. ppppbbbt.
    Yeah, in keeping with the "cheap cruiser" concept, I think the clamp-on front cantilever mounts and some wide profile cantilevers will be the way to go. I wound up forgetting how to coaster-brake again last night and had to flintstone myself to a quick stop to keep from running into my grill. I note that I have run MtFixies with both F&R and just Frt brakes, so I know that just a front will be very helpful.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  11. #211
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    And now I'm going to laugh at myself. "Cheap cruiser" concept? HA!

    Parts for a front brake;

    Clamp on canti adapters - $43
    Brake lever - each $12, or pair $17
    Tektro CR720 wide profile brakes - $20
    1 1/8" clamp on cable stop - pair $12

    Or, +50% to cost of bike. The clamp on adapters are the big hit. I think I have "who knows" levers, and low profile but not wide profile brakes, but not cable stops.

    My GF is lusting after the Goose - may have to get another.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  12. #212
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    ...My GF is lusting after the Goose - may have to get another.
    Can I have the old GF then. Mine's just about worn out.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  13. #213
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Can I have the old GF then. Mine's just about worn out.
    Silly boy, good GF's are far harder to find than bikes. Since she doesn't like green, I guess #2 will be red.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  14. #214
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    273
    Multi geared lessons learned. Ok so relacing straight with an alfine 8 speed pulls the chainline way to far over into the tire. Here's what did work. If you lace dished opposite normal. Thats to say longer spokes on the drive side and shorter on the opposite so your offset opposite what a normal cassette or freewheel would be your drivetrain lines up perfect. You end up with a slightly longer axle extension on the non drive side but it held my 255 pound behind without giving at all and I drove off a few 8-10 inch drops just to see. The disc brake setup is useless. The vendor I got the alfine from was very nice and agreed to take it back and let me swap towards a nexus and some other stuff. Mainly so I can get the coaster brake back but I'll still have 8 speeds. Also I did some measuring and as long as the current rear sprocket doesn't move much and you run the alfine chain tensioner you should be able to go multi geared in front. You have to drill and tap the frame for the tensioner to thread llike a normal rear derailluer which I'll do once I get the back straight. I'm also gonna drill and tap me some holes for accesories. Water cages and such. I'll get some picks up for you guys soon.
    1993 Trek Multitrack 700
    2011 Trek Hifi Plus
    2013 WalGoose

  15. #215
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    Easy& cheap source for a wide variety of 3/32 width cogs is to disassemble an old shimano or SRAM casette that uses all individual cogs (no alloy carrier like on the nicer casettes). Casette cogs use 9 splines but you can file off 6 of them leaving three splines in the same pattern needed.
    This is a great tip.

    I did this today on mine. Worked like a charm. I now have a 23.

    I used a dremel with the plain old sanding drum to take out the excess teeth and used a file to narrow the remaining three.

    I had to go to the LBS to be shown how to get the cog off though. The thing that looks like an O ring is actually a split ring that just separates to come off. So easy once one knows how. I should have looked it up online but I got a chain at the LBS while I was there because one needs a longer one with the 23 cog.

  16. #216
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by dudeist View Post
    Upgrades and Accessories Click for another disc adapter. Just in case the front canti's wear thru the rim, or get too icy in winter, or the rear coaster keeps taking 1/2 hour to get used to on each ride. I'm keeping this Beast, even if it becomes spare for "real" future fatty.
    I don't think the rear adapter will work with the Beast's huge dropouts. They may be large enough to just drill and mount. I will jump into that in a few days when my bb7 arrives for the back. I'm digging the canti's on the front for now. Wonder how long it would take for a brake to burn through the rim as you were saying. I would think quite a while.

  17. #217
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    I have v-brakes on my other bike and they last if You stay out of mud and slush and road salt and sand, but they're cheaper to replace, too. These goose rims seem just as thick at the edge as any other rims I've had.

  18. #218
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19

    Beast modifications: phase one

    I don't think I have had this much fun biking for $199.
    The beast rides fine out of th box but I am beginning to modify mine.
    Some parts that make a big difference:
    1. Soma laid back seatpost
    (This is an inexpensive way to fix the beast geometry and lose some weight)
    2. Front canti brake
    I took my beast around town and the rear coaster is not enough on hills.
    Go ahead and shell out the $$$ for a front canti and the Identiti brake bosses and a long drop hanger.
    Other modifications for phase one:
    I also added a vintage bmx mongoose seat, titanium stem, titanium 118 titec bar and ti bar ends.
    For brakes I bought the extra wide problem solver hangers but I don't think they are essential. I was fortunate enough to have a box full of bike parts including Avid Tri-align cantilevers which when combined with the sliding brake bosses become Pent-aligns. I am using an old-scool Diacomp MKII lever.
    I decided to go with the ZOOM 1 1/8 threaded to threadless stem adapter. It was a couple of dollars more than other brands, but the stack height is less and... it says ZOOM on it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Beast modifications-image.jpg  

    Mongoose Beast modifications-image.jpg  

    Mongoose Beast modifications-image.jpg  


  19. #219
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    I thought using the belt sander would work well to bald out the tire. Well it works, but very slowly and with a lot of time and effort. The oscillating tool is probably easier.


    Edit: A jointer/planer electric planer made quick work of it. Not bald but fairly so. I think that's how I want it.

  20. #220
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,949
    Out of curiosity, what is the total investment into these bikes and how much more money is on the horizon?

  21. #221
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Out of curiosity, what is the total investment into these bikes and how much more money is on the horizon?
    Let's see -

    A better gear ratio;
    a new rear cog - $5
    a new chainring - $30,
    a crankset - free
    chainring bolts - $10
    spacers to correct chainline - $15
    chain? - 21t will fit with stock chain and chainring, or with 34/21 I now have so: free

    $60

    Handlebars
    New stem - $17
    Handlebar - free
    grips - $20

    $37

    So $216+$97=$313 as it sits now

    Planning on a front brake;

    Clamp on canti adapters - $43
    Brake lever - pair $17
    Tektro CR720 wide profile brakes - $20
    1 1/8" clamp on cable stop - pair $12

    +$92, total $405
    Still not bad, and since I get a lot of joy out of modding/fitting/experimenting - it's cheap entertainment.

    I note that if I was presented with a brand new fatbike, I know that I would be changing stem/bars/gears anyways because I always have needed to. Matter of fact, the 'Goose is the first "complete" bike I've bought in a long time. My first 3 bikes were completes, and I always wound up doing the parts changes to get it to fit and work as I wanted. Now I just get a frame and build it up so I don't have a bunch of take-offs. I get those from friends who buy completes
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  22. #222
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kbollox's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    145
    Yup, right at $400 for my build:

    Mongoose Beast modifications-imag0234_zpsc29be3fe.jpg

  23. #223
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    I spent about the same amount in the same way as Wadester, then tried the 27tpi Nate- heavy but AWESOME grip, 27tpi Larry- not sure about him, And a pair of On-One Floaters 120tpi 1400g that I think I'll really like. $65 ea and free shipping.

  24. #224
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19
    Wal-Mart:
    Mongoose Beast: $199

    PARTS BOX:
    Titec Bar
    Ti Bar-ends
    Ti stem
    Long drop cable hanger
    Cyclone singlespeed crank *38 tooth ring
    Avid Tri-align canti brake
    1980s Mongoose Seat
    Chain
    Grips
    Suntour XCPro Greaseguard pedals

    LBS:
    Dia Comp Levers: $20 *LBS

    Universal Cycles:
    Cane Creek 28.6 27.2 Seatpost Shim: $9.00
    Soma Layback Seatpost: $25.00
    Vuelta 104mm x 32 Flat Ring: $17.00
    Zoom Q Stem Adapter $19.00
    Identiti Clamp-on Brake Mounts: $38.00
    Problem Solvers 50mm wide cable hanger: $13.00 (not essential)


    E-bay:
    Ritchey Logic Threaded 1 1/8 Headset: $12.99
    *Another worthwhile upgrade as the stock headset is absolute garbage

    Amazon:
    YST Sealed BSA Cupset: $6.18
    Sturmey Archer 19t Cog: $3.50
    Q-Tubes SL 2.4-2.7: $7.50 x2 = $15.00

    So far the total = $327.67

    Other than being extremely heavy I like the stock tires. I do plan to buy a set of Vee Rubber tires when the style I want is released in a couple of weeks.

    Like many other people here after all is said and done for the price of a fat-bike frame I have actual fat-wheels on the ground. I know there are a lot of haters and naysayers out there but for anyone with a part-box or a spare unused bike, this is a great and inexpensive way to try something new and fun. As a bonus for those with kids, the seat slides down low enough to let children around 10 or 11 years old or older ride as well.

  25. #225
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Just got back from my first "real" ride. It was down on the beach. Very cool. This is going to be a fun way to get a workout. It was amazing to me how well the bike floated on the sand and how quickly I was three miles down the beach. I experimented with tire pressure and dropped them to around 3 lbs. Too low. It felt slow and the imprint in the sand looked deeper than the one with higher pressure.

    The 23 cog on the back felt almost right. But I might be able to use an even higher number tooth one. I like to spin rather than stomp. The pedals with toe clips are OK but I'm used to clipless and I may go that way. The semi-balded front tire was fine.

    And I have a lighting system....Riding the beach at night.

    Only problem is the 40 foot high 45 degree sandy bluff I have to get the bike up to get home. It was not easy, at all.
    Last edited by beachride; 05-08-2013 at 07:45 PM.

  26. #226
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1494_zps3a40b8c0.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1498_zps633bad62.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1501_zpseb9f6674.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1503_zpsddf99149.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1505_zps4bf610a8.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1506_zps868dc729.jpg

    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1507_zpsd65d0d90.jpg

    Vee Rubber 26x4 Mission tires
    Surly fat bike light tube
    Gusset Stash 680 handlebars 31.8
    Shadow Conspiracy Ol' dirty flange grips - clear
    FFS 120mm stem (to compensate for the swept bars)
    Zoom 1 1/8" threaded to 1 1/8" threadless adapter
    Cane Creek 27.2 - 28.6 seatpost shim
    Kalloy SP-342 Uno seatpost 27.2
    WTB Rocket V saddle
    Vuelta cranks 175mm
    Vuelta flat chainring 32t
    20t rear cog
    ACS Crossfire chain 3/32"
    Gusset Slim Jim HL platform pedals - clear/red
    Custom "Fat Goose" decals

  27. #227
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    I just got this bike. How do I fix the coaster brakes from squealing so loud?

  28. #228
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    I just got this bike. How do I fix the coaster brakes from squealing so loud?
    Disassemble the hub and add grease.

  29. #229
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostQuick View Post
    Disassemble the hub and add grease.
    ummm, I have never done that before. Is it hard, is there an online video? What kind of grease should I use, anything specific?
    Last edited by dinosaur13; 05-08-2013 at 07:01 PM. Reason: added words

  30. #230
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostQuick View Post
    Disassemble the hub and add grease.
    Should I have Walmart do it or take it to a bike shop?

  31. #231
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    876
    Call Walmart, they'll probably send you another bike for parts. LOL

  32. #232
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by rjedoaks View Post
    Call Walmart, they'll probably send you another bike for parts. LOL
    So its not worth trying to have a bike shop fix it? I don't know too much about greasing hubs.

  33. #233
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    if you are reasonably mechanical, you can do it. if not, take it to the lbs.

  34. #234
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    876
    Sure you could have it greased. you might want to give it a go yourself.
    I was kinda kidding, although several members were shipped new bikes because their are no spare parts

  35. #235
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by mitmoe View Post
    I don't think the rear adapter will work with the Beast's huge dropouts. They may be large enough to just drill and mount.
    yup, this.

    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Out of curiosity, what is the total investment into these bikes and how much more money is on the horizon?
    and of course, the follow-up comment from the fatwally deniers is, "for that much money you could have bought a used Pugsley".

    but, that pugsley would need a new bb, brakes, and drivetrain bits, to the tune of another, what, $300? $500? so let's not act like it's really an option.

  36. #236
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    Should I have Walmart do it or take it to a bike shop?

    Between those two choices definitely the LBS. They can also adjust the bearings for you.

  37. #237
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by rjedoaks View Post
    Sure you could have it greased. you might want to give it a go yourself.
    I was kinda kidding, although several members were shipped new bikes because their are no spare parts
    Since its under warranty why not have Walmart grease it for free?

  38. #238
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    Between those two choices definitely the LBS. They can also adjust the bearings for you.
    Normally what would that all cost?

  39. #239
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    Since its under warranty why not have Walmart grease it for free?
    that is not something that they can do. they can give you your money back, or give you a new one, but they can't fix the on you have.

  40. #240
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    ummm, I have never done that before. Is it hard, is there an online video? What kind of grease should I use, anything specific?
    I did this back when I was a kid. Not too hard, can be done with a crescent wrench. But you do need a little basic mechanical skill.

    Google for "overhaul coaster brake hub", and you can see many options to choose from - here's one:

    Overhauling a Coaster Brake Bike

    Here's what you're dealing with:
    Name:  CHO1.jpg
Views: 3998
Size:  37.7 KB
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  41. #241
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    that is not something that they can do. they can give you your money back, or give you a new one, but they can't fix the on you have.
    The issue in getting a new one is that I may have the same problem. Is it worth fixing or will a bike shop charge too much in a case like this that doesn't make it worth taking there?

  42. #242
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    193
    anymore broken axles?

  43. #243
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    sorry, dinosaur, i don't know how much they would charge.

    wadester, my experience is like yours. me and my buddy marc nasser took a coaster brake apart and got it back together back in 7th grade, so its can't have been too hard.

  44. #244
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    Bicycle Coaster Brakes - Another useful link. Mine came with black grease inside and clear on the bearings. I'm carrying the cone wrenches and a bigger 15mm on every ride. And cab fare.

  45. #245
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    I can try and fix it. I just don't want to wreck it and void the warranty.

  46. #246
    Dirt Huffer
    Reputation: AC/BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,643
    I completely took apart my coaster brake assembly blindly, having no knowledge of how they work or any idea if i'd know how to put it back together.

    I got everything apart, rebuilt, greased and put back together in under an hour. It was so simple I couldn't believe it. If you doubt you ability to remember where the few "loose" parts go, snap a few pics with your camera phone as you disassemble to refer back to if needed. If you're just greasing the bearings, you could probably have that done in 20mins or less

  47. #247
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bighit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,524
    Bold move. They re not that hard but the phone pics help. I still got o get my BB apart for a lube.

    I am doing a huge urban assault ride in Philly tomorrow. Hours long, plenty of miles, up and down train stairs, in the train, beer and cigars. Let's see how this beast fairs.
    2013 mongoose Fat bike
    2012 Moonlander.

    http://undergroundvelo.proboards.com/

  48. #248
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Mongoose is sending me a new wheel. Its the hub shell not the lack of grease.

  49. #249
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    While I'm riding the Beast I noticed that the tires (prickly things) are hitting the chain guard. Is this pretty normal? Do I just have to allow this go away over time while these prickly rubber things rub off?

  50. #250
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    While I'm riding the Beast I noticed that the tires (prickly things) are hitting the chain guard. Is this pretty normal? Do I just have to allow this go away over time while these prickly rubber things rub off?
    Yes, this is normal on this bike. You can cut them off if the sound bothers you.

  51. #251
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostQuick View Post
    Yes, this is normal on this bike. You can cut them off if the sound bothers you.
    I was hoping it wasn't something else more serious. Thx

  52. #252
    Sastrugi
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    6

    Beast, aka.... Wal-Y

    Nothing dramatic, basically a stock ride with new grips, pedals, saddle, an Endomorph on the front end. But closing in on 75 miles of winter trail/street riding and still holding in there! Looking forward to enjoying some snow free trails!

    Mongoose Beast modifications-wal-y-trail.jpg

  53. #253
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    While I'm riding the Beast I noticed that the tires (prickly things) are hitting the chain guard. Is this pretty normal? Do I just have to allow this go away over time while these prickly rubber things rub off?

    One of the most important things one do for these bikes is to remove those. I calculate the weight savings alone to be at least 5 grams of rotating weight. Plus they attract and hold sand and dirt adding another 10 grams. Also they cause greater wind resistance. By removing them I calculate I can now ride 0.0000004% faster with the same effort.

    Plus they were ugly.


  54. #254
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    One of the most important things one do for these bikes is to remove those. I calculate the weight savings alone to be at least 5 grams of rotating weight. Plus they attract and hold sand and dirt adding another 10 grams. Also they cause greater wind resistance. By removing them I calculate I can now ride 0.0000004% faster with the same effort.

    Plus they were ugly.

    I disagree with your, clearly not very well thought out, analysis, particularly as it applies to wind resistance. I am certain the little rubber hairs are designed to function similar to vortex generators on an airplane wing or the divots on a golf ball and provide at least a 0.00003% aerodynamic advantage to the Beast, far outweighing any weight loss benefit.

    So, if you have already removed them, I'd suggest using some shoe goo or rubber cement to reapply all of them for max benefit.

  55. #255
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobytao View Post
    ... and provide at least a 0.00003% aerodynamic advantage to the Beast, far outweighing any weight loss benefit....
    +1

    This amply demonstrated by the pics of Manuel Beastly flying his Walgoose at Sea Otter.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  56. #256
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by Scoobytao View Post
    I disagree with your, clearly not very well thought out, analysis, particularly as it applies to wind resistance. I am certain the little rubber hairs are designed to function similar to vortex generators on an airplane wing or the divots on a golf ball and provide at least a 0.00003% aerodynamic advantage to the Beast, far outweighing any weight loss benefit.

    So, if you have already removed them, I'd suggest using some shoe goo or rubber cement to reapply all of them for max benefit.

    Darn! Hadn't thought of that! I'll use some AMAZING GOOP to make hundreds of hairlike nibs oriented in the direction of rotation. They will act like air ratchets, speeding me along with almost no effort at all. Cool.


    Seriously though, I now have a 27 tooth cog on and it's not too low a gear ratio for the beach. It feels about right. It is too low for general road though but all my road riding on my ride is uphill so it works well. I cranked up a pretty steep part of my street and nothing broke! Yahoo!

  57. #257
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by dinosaur13 View Post
    While I'm riding the Beast I noticed that the tires (prickly things) are hitting the chain guard. Is this pretty normal? Do I just have to allow this go away over time while these prickly rubber things rub off?
    This is not normal at all. It is normal to REMOVE the chain guard.
    -lighter weight
    -maintains the aerodynamic advantage of the hairs

  58. #258
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7
    Got the rear disc brake installed on my Beast. Here's the post

    Disc brake Beast!! | The UNDERGROUND!

  59. #259
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    that's beautiful, man. way to make it happen.

  60. #260
    Sastrugi
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by AKPowderhound View Post
    Nothing dramatic, basically a stock ride with new grips, pedals, saddle, an Endomorph on the front end. But closing in on 75 miles of winter trail/street riding and still holding in there! Looking forward to enjoying some snow free trails!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Wal-Y Trail.jpg 
Views:	1155 
Size:	341.8 KB 
ID:	798070
    Okay took the time to try to carve some weight off. Headset converter, alloy bars, crank arms, 32 tooth front, retained stock rear. Surly 120 tpi front tire, stock rear tire. (Origin8 Devist-8er 120tpi on order) Stock tubes. Still at 41lbs, so far all from the parts bin, only cost at this point the Devist-8er and some grips for $70.00...

    Thing is still insanely fun to ride, had gotten so used to the 36 tooth, swapping to the 32 tooth should make it even more fun on the trails!

    Mongoose Beast modifications-walgoose1.jpgMongoose Beast modifications-walgoose2.jpg

  61. #261
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    nice! those bars look cool, and with the stem they give you a bit more room, huh?

  62. #262
    Sastrugi
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    6
    They were a random combination, but ended up being a nice fit. I swapped to a shorter stem but ended up going back to this one.

  63. #263
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19
    Mongoose Beast modifications-image.jpg
    Phase 2 upgrade complete:

    Rear canti brake system successfully installed
    Dia-Comp Lever
    Avid tri-align long arm brakes
    (Mounting sliders installed upside down and backwards)
    Problem Solver Wide Hanger
    Problem Solver 38.1mm Clamp Cable Stops
    Tektro short drop seatpost bolt canti-hanger
    Identiti fork bosses
    + Custom cut 1 1/4 Outer Diameter 7/8 Inner Diameter garbage disposal hose adapter from Home Depot less than 50 cents
    Last edited by RetroCyclo; 05-18-2013 at 06:44 AM.

  64. #264
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    ^ Wow cool work. But arghhh don't get me thinking. Took the beast from the beach onto the hilly, tight, singletrack yesterday and it felt a bit out of it's element. Like I pushed it uphills, and just hoped the coaster brake would be enough on the downhills. Being new to the trail upped the pucker factor. But the sandy downhills and the sweeping turns were a blast. And the beast can really just roll over stuff .

  65. #265
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by AKPowderhound View Post
    They were a random combination, but ended up being a nice fit. I swapped to a shorter stem but ended up going back to this one.
    i'm trying to decide between a long stem and a setback seatpost. not sure which will ride better.

  66. #266
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    On today's ride my chain came off the cog just as I was starting down a hill. I had to bail out by riding up onto someone's front lawn to stop.

    The chain is coming off too easily with the 27 tooth cassette cog back there. I don't know if it's because it's slightly offline, the shallow tooth hyperglide sprocket or because of too much play in the chain, or all three But being without brakes is not good.

  67. #267
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    i hear ya. i had to push my foot against the rear tire to stop last time i rode. mine was falling off the front chainring, and I think we figured out the cause - flex in the chainstay part of the frame. is that where yours is falling off? or is yours falling off in the back?

  68. #268
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19
    Bill,
    If it is either or... Go with the set-back seatpost.
    The Soma one works great for me, my stem is 120mm
    The layback seatpost swap makes the overall geometry nicer while increasing reach.
    The stem increases reach without addressing the geometry issue.
    Having one rim brake makes a huge performance and safety difference.
    Two is better if you pick up another set of bosses and some thick garbage disposal hose.

  69. #269
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    i hear ya. i had to push my foot against the rear tire to stop last time i rode. mine was falling off the front chainring, and I think we figured out the cause - flex in the chainstay part of the frame. is that where yours is falling off? or is yours falling off in the back?
    Mine is falling off the cog, in back. Now that I think about it, it's probably because of the cog design. It's meant for a derailler that keeps the chain aligned. Without the derailler it's probably too easy for it to get shaken off . I think the teeth are kinda shallow and there are a few that are cut back to help shifting.

  70. #270
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    On today's ride my chain came off the cog just as I was starting down a hill. I had to bail out by riding up onto someone's front lawn to stop.

    The chain is coming off too easily with the 27 tooth cassette cog back there. I don't know if it's because it's slightly offline, the shallow tooth hyperglide sprocket or because of too much play in the chain, or all three But being without brakes is not good.
    The tooth profile of cogs/rings designed for shifting is for easily moving off - and especially in the "shift zones". When I started mt fixie, it kept coming off the front (part of a triple set) ring - but never the made-for-it rear cog. Moved to a "single speed" ring and had no more problems.

    I note that my Beast is running a Surly singlespeed ring and a shimano nexus rear cog. Haven't even offered to come off, and the chain is not that tight. Of course, I also went to 7mm's of effort to make sure they ring&cog were aligned as well. YMMV.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  71. #271
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by RetroCyclo View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	3043 
Size:	177.2 KB 
ID:	800050
    Phase 2 upgrade complete:

    Rear canti brake system successfully installed
    Dia-Comp Lever
    Avid tri-align long arm brakes
    (Mounting sliders installed upside down and backwards)
    Problem Solver Wide Hanger
    Problem Solver 38.1mm Clamp Cable Stops
    Tektro short drop seatpost bolt canti-hanger
    Identiti fork bosses
    + Custom cut 1 1/4 Outer Diameter 7/8 Inner Diameter garbage disposal hose adapter from Home Depot less than 50 cents
    Thank You, Retrocyclo, and congratulations for a pioneering achievement in Fatgoose re-engineering. The long arms on that brake, the wide yoke, and the short hanger all look ideal for this bike, and the hose adapter is ingenious. Please show and tell a little more. Is there a chance that a less expensive canti would work, or did You look at others and find this Avid brake uniquely qualified to do the job w/o sticking out too much? Bonus: We get to keep the coaster brake !
    Last edited by dudeist; 05-22-2013 at 07:51 AM.

  72. #272
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    Quote Originally Posted by RetroCyclo View Post
    Bill,
    If it is either or... Go with the set-back seatpost.
    Having one rim brake makes a huge performance and safety difference.
    Thanks for the advice, Retro.

    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    It's meant for a derailler that keeps the chain aligned. Without the derailler it's probably too easy for it to get shaken off . I think the teeth are kinda shallow and there are a few that are cut back to help shifting.
    Hmm, good point.

    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    The tooth profile of cogs/rings designed for shifting is for easily moving off - and especially in the "shift zones". When I started mt fixie, it kept coming off the front (part of a triple set) ring - but never the made-for-it rear cog. Moved to a "single speed" ring and had no more problems.
    Thanks, wadester.

  73. #273
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nagant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    55

    What the Beast is really good for

    I own a Pugs Necro. I use it for snow, trail, gravel, and river riding. I bought a Beast just cuz. The one modification I made was to replace the T18 witha T23. This bike will never do what the Necro does. What it is good for is to hop on and ride about town. The geometry of this bike is very upright and it rides very easy and stable. It is quite relaxing to ride. I think it is the easiest "look Mom, no hands" riding bike I've had. The only other mod I plan this Summer is a cargo rack for mail, groceries, etc. I can't see using such a heavy sucker for snow riding or river riding when I have the Pugs.

    I guess I kind of see the Beast as a cruiser.

  74. #274
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    to me, it's a smooth-riding, go anywhere cruiser. i noticed last night how well it soaks up all the noise / vibration / harshness that my other bike experiences on gravel or uneven pavement. don't ride one if you don't want attention, though, huh?

  75. #275
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    10
    I'd like to do something similar to Thumpy69's mod. Were you able to use the stock spokes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpy69 View Post
    Multi geared lessons learned. Ok so relacing straight with an alfine 8 speed pulls the chainline way to far over into the tire. Here's what did work. If you lace dished opposite normal. Thats to say longer spokes on the drive side and shorter on the opposite so your offset opposite what a normal cassette or freewheel would be your drivetrain lines up perfect. You end up with a slightly longer axle extension on the non drive side but it held my 255 pound behind without giving at all and I drove off a few 8-10 inch drops just to see. The disc brake setup is useless. The vendor I got the alfine from was very nice and agreed to take it back and let me swap towards a nexus and some other stuff. Mainly so I can get the coaster brake back but I'll still have 8 speeds. Also I did some measuring and as long as the current rear sprocket doesn't move much and you run the alfine chain tensioner you should be able to go multi geared in front. You have to drill and tap the frame for the tensioner to thread llike a normal rear derailluer which I'll do once I get the back straight. I'm also gonna drill and tap me some holes for accesories. Water cages and such. I'll get some picks up for you guys soon.

  76. #276
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by dudeist View Post
    Thank You, Retrocyclo, and congratulations for a pioneering achievement in Fatgoose re-engineering. The long arms on that brake, the wide yoke, and the short hanger all look ideal for this bike, and the hose adapter is ingenious. Please show and tell a little more. Is there a chance that a less expensive canti would work, or did You look at others and find this Avid brake uniquely qualified to do the job w/o sticking out too much? Bonus: We get to keep the coaster brake !
    Thanks for the encouragement....
    The front Avid brake wasn't an issue and I could use the Avid Short arms with no modification. I could probably also use a regular cable hanger vice the wide one.
    *However, the wide hanger one IS needed for the rear. Even with the wide hanger the straddle cable is precariously close to the tire.
    Also, I actually don't recommend using the long arm Avids, the moon-shaped adaptors had to be mounted backwards and upside-down to make them work. It actually wasn't something I would try except I have this box full o retro parts so I wanted to see if I could make something I already owned work before buying something. The wide-arm cheap-o Tektro brakes may actually do the trick better, but I haven't tried them.
    CAUTION: another problem with the rear is that the rim is so wide and the spacing so narrow that one would have to disassemble the bolted on brake boss system to remove the rear wheel. Since this is a singlespeed bike with non-QR hubs I don't forsee removing the wheel often so that isn't a big issue.
    Also, you can try cheaper zip-tie based cable stops but I prefer the 38.1 Problem Solver bolt on ones. They tie in nicely with the Idintiti bolt on bosses. I'll post pictures of those later as well.
    Also, yes the short drop hanger works but it is still just a bit cramped.
    I'd actually recommend trying a seatpost clamp on style cable hanger vice a seatpost bolt cable hanger. Also, the problem solver cable hanger has an adjustable mechanism is cheaper and it looks shorter as well. (I may actually switch to one myself)

    In summary, if I had to build a rear brake system from scratch here is what I'd recommend:
    1. Seatpost Clamp-on cable hanger (or problem solver short drop bolt)
    2. Problem Solver WIDE hangers *essential on rear
    3. Identiti brake mounts
    4. Custom cut Garbage disposal hose (2x 1 inch long by 1 1/4 OD 7/8 ID)
    5. Problem Solver 38.1mm Cable Stop clams x2
    6. Cant-brake lever
    7. Brake Cable w'housing
    8. Tektro cyclocross style wide CR720 (or similar) brake arm

  77. #277
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    236
    This is a great thread. I have been wanting to build a fat bike for some time now, and this thread has inspired me to give it a go. I have been reading up on this bike trying to gather specs, and this is what I have accumulated so far, as well as some numbers I would like to find...

    Headtube angle - ~74 degrees
    Fork steerer tube - 1 1/8" threaded
    Seattube ID - 28.6mm
    BB width - 110mm
    Hub spacing - 135mm front/170mm rear
    Gearing - 36t front/18t rear
    Rim width - ?
    Spoke count - ?
    ETT - ?
    Seattube length - ?

    Can anybody fill in the blanks for me, and/or add to this list?

    My Build Plans:
    Vee Rubber Tires
    Drilled rims
    Lighter tubes, perhaps with pool noodles
    XT m750 crank arms w/ spiderless 32t ring
    YST sealed BSA cupset
    19t rear SA coaster brake cog
    Ritchey Headset
    Steerer tube adapter
    Stem/bars/seatpost from the parts bin

    Eventually, I will build a new wheelset and weld on disc brake mounts, but I am going to have some fun with the coaster brake first.

  78. #278
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    to me, it's a smooth-riding, go anywhere cruiser. i noticed last night how well it soaks up all the noise / vibration / harshness that my other bike experiences on gravel or uneven pavement. don't ride one if you don't want attention, though, huh?

    Yeah really, the attention it gets. I have to start going to places with more women though, I'm getting tired of talking to ugly old guys like me and kids. Come to think of it, I have been to places with women and they don't talk to me. I guess they don't appreciate beasts.

  79. #279
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    Rims 100mm, spokes 36 each, ett 23"- [that explains why I like my 150 mm stem so much], seat tube 16 1/4" from cl of bb to top end. I 'm not sure how to measure crank offset, but it needs some. Others have had them hit the seatstay. Maybe the new bb allows more adjustment. I like the 22t rear cog for climbing, and when I can't go any faster on the flats I just coast and coast for longer than I ever thought possible.

  80. #280
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    yeah, the guys and kids can't hold it in. women are somehow more reserved, although women over 45 riding with men tend to be reasonably friendly.

    thanks for the details, retro.

  81. #281
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2
    Hello!
    I'm new to the forum and I just picked up a blue Beast!
    I hope you don't mind me jumping into your thread?
    There are many great mods and ideas here and thats how I found this forum.

    My mods planned for my Beast....
    first off like most of you have mentioned all the bearings are too tight so
    disassembling and greasing everything is top of the list
    Then,
    add Front and rear canti brakes(already picking up parts for this)
    change out pedals (the ones that came with it hardly turn)
    change seat
    replace grips
    swap out rear cog to a 22T


    I really dont like coaster brakes and was wondering if anyone has tried the
    washer and spring unbrake to freewheel the rear hub yet?
    Ive done this to a few coaster brake wheels before but havent tried it on the beast. I know relacing the wheel with a freewheel hub(if possible) would be the best but this would be a quick fix.

  82. #282
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,352
    Yes, the stock pedals barely turn - their bearings are as tight as everything else! Pry off the end cap and adjust.

    I note most folks are using a threadless adapter, but I found a very nice stem for about the same price. YMMV

    Name:  31ntCYRZfWL._SY300_.jpg
Views: 3042
Size:  5.6 KB

    And if you're looking for a low-ball hub ($30), try here:

    Wide Hub - 1 Speed FW Chrome - Cycles U.S. LLC/Choppers U.S.
    Name:  Freewheel70x170.jpg
Views: 3128
Size:  6.1 KB
    Wide Hub - Freewheel/Disc BLK - Cycles U.S. LLC/Choppers U.S.
    Name:  02927.JPG
Views: 3024
Size:  7.3 KB
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  83. #283
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    110
    Mongoose Beast modifications-2013-05-23_17-33-52_17.jpg


    So, I removed the cranks and the weight of them almost gave me a hernia. They must be that new lead/steel alloy. I had an old triple lying around so I removed the outer two rings. So now I have a 28 by 19. For riding on the beach I might go lower. Clipless pedals are OK for the beach bike that it is. The 17 Inch rise handlebars are new and add to the ridiculousness of the whole thing and making it look like the goose that it is. A Cane Creek suspension seatpost adds to the WTF factor and coupled with big soft tires gives a soft if somewhat bouncy ride.

    It doesn't like it's picture being taken and so was warping time and space in defense as I snapped the photo. Thus the strange colors. I'm not kidding.

  84. #284
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,033
    ^^^ Warping time is the replacement for warp speed.

    Nice ... It would actually look good painted that way.

  85. #285
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-05-23_17-33-52_17.jpg 
Views:	613 
Size:	164.2 KB 
ID:	801750

    So, I removed the cranks and the weight of them almost gave me a hernia. They must be that new lead/steel alloy.
    Yes: Those cranks are ridiculous.... people make fun of the wheels/tires being heavy as boat anchors etc.... I think these cranks really are so heavy they could serve as a small craft canoe/kayak anchor. Tie a rope onto the pedal hole drop anchor and let the chainring ramps grip something. Argh!

  86. #286
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,033
    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostQuick View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN1501_zpseb9f6674.jpg 
Views:	2104 
Size:	87.2 KB 
ID:	797443


    Custom "Fat Goose" decals
    Where did you get these ?

  87. #287
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,553
    Quote Originally Posted by beachride View Post
    So, I removed the cranks and the weight of them almost gave me a hernia. They must be that new lead/steel alloy....
    Big mistake. Those cranks are made of leadinium alloy specially developed for the Walgoose factory team. Once spun up to 300 rpm their flywheel momentum counteracts the force of gravity.

    You don't have to believe me - there's plenty pics of Walgoose factory rider Manual Beastly actually flying his Walgoose.

    Also as proof - how many Walgeese do you see flying once their cranks have been replaced?

    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  88. #288
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ferrstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    346
    Word of the day: Walgeese

  89. #289
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    anyone figured out a different BB? been hearing of a few more bent spindles.

  90. #290
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nagant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    55
    The Walbeast spindles are not bent, they a Wal-engineered to a special geometry to take advantage of the vectored forces of your pedal stroke to maximize the power transfer of each stroke. It is brilliant engineering that soon everyone will copy.

  91. #291
    Nemophilist
    Reputation: TrailMaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,873
    Quote Originally Posted by nagant View Post
    The Walbeast spindles are not bent, they a Wal-engineered to a special geometry to take advantage of the vectored forces of your pedal stroke to maximize the power transfer of each stroke. It is brilliant engineering that soon everyone will copy.
    Ha!

    I used to re engineer my one piece cranks on a regular basis when I was a kid. They were a maintenance item for me. Twisted a pair or two in half even.

    An early attempt at bio pace, perhaps.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  92. #292
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jackbombay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    672
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    Yes, the stock pedals barely turn - their bearings are as tight as everything else! Pry off the end cap and adjust.

    I note most folks are using a threadless adapter, but I found a very nice stem for about the same price. YMMV

    Name:  31ntCYRZfWL._SY300_.jpg
Views: 3042
Size:  5.6 KB

    Have a link handy for that stem?

  93. #293
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,107
    Similar to a breakaway derailleur hanger, the BB spindle and rear hub mechanisms give way to protect the more valuable parts of the bike, like the, the, ummm... nevermind.

  94. #294
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,033
    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Similar to a breakaway derailleur hanger, the BB spindle and rear hub mechanisms give way to protect the more valuable parts of the bike, like the, the, ummm... nevermind.
    Hmm,
    I wonder what my cracked fork saved ?

  95. #295
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,107
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeabuser View Post
    Hmm,
    I wonder what my cracked fork saved ?
    Hopefully saved you from buying another Walmart bike?

  96. #296
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,033
    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Hopefully saved you from buying another Walmart bike?
    Steel ... When the FREE replacement arrives, I'll have 2

  97. #297
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    anyone figured out a different BB? been hearing of a few more bent spindles.
    Anybody have the guts to cut the shell down to 100mm, then face and tap it for a proper fat bike BB. My frame hasn't arrived yet, but if it arrives damaged, and I end up with an extra bike as many of you have, I may give this a try.

  98. #298
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,688
    yeah, i think that is the right answer.

    bikeabuser, i tried the free replacement route, but they just told me to return it to a walmart store. how did you manage to get yours?

  99. #299
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,033
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    yeah, i think that is the right answer.

    bikeabuser, i tried the free replacement route, but they just told me to return it to a walmart store. how did you manage to get yours?
    Itold them the truth.
    I'd spent considerable time taking the bike apart, greasing everything up properly, putting it back together, changing tires, etcetera, and I didn't want to go through that whole process again.

    The first phone call was as yours was ... The second call was when I explained things, and they said OK, we'll send you the parts you need.

    FWIW, they told me they've ordered extra forks and bottom brackets to have available.
    Houston, we have a problem.

  100. #300
    Are we there yet?
    Reputation: AlmostQuick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    171
    Mongoose Beast modifications-dscn1501_zpseb9f6674.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by bikeabuser View Post
    Where did you get these ?
    Made up at a local sign shop. I have 2 pairs left. $25 a pair shipping included. If anyone is interested PM me.

Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Bighits 37lb Mongoose Beast
    By bighit in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: 12-02-2016, 12:20 PM
  2. Mongoose Beast review etc.... Walmart Fatty!
    By 2silent in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 453
    Last Post: 10-05-2014, 05:41 AM
  3. Walmart Mongoose Beast sucks!
    By Larry Endomorph in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 129
    Last Post: 02-24-2014, 01:06 PM
  4. Mongoose Beast... cannot wait
    By 2silent in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 84
    Last Post: 11-09-2013, 08:59 AM
  5. Mongoose Beast Fatbike - Specs + Pics!
    By theboss in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-13-2013, 09:12 AM

Members who have read this thread: 39

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •