• 01-31-2013
    TrailMaker
    Meet Trailmaker #2 - The Kroozer!
  • 01-31-2013
    Lone Desert Walker
    That is badass! Good craftsmanship, I love the seatstay to dropout transition. Frame design is cool and paint looks great. Rock on.
  • 01-31-2013
    NYrr496
    What beautiful work.
  • 01-31-2013
    jonshonda
    AWESOME!! I love the blue, and I love the lines of the frame.

    :thumbsup:
  • 01-31-2013
    JoeG
    The whole thing is RUINED by that spoke protector. :madman:

    TAKE IT OFF!:nono:

    Otherwise - beautiful! :D
  • 01-31-2013
    TrailMaker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeG View Post
    The whole thing is RUINED by that spoke protector. :madman:

    TAKE IT OFF!:nono:

    Yeh?...

    I used to think that too, until I lost about half a dozen drive side spokes 5 miles from the trail head. That was a long firggin walk.
  • 01-31-2013
    BoogieMang
    Man, I wish I had the tools and skills to do that. The seatstays and transition to the dropouts are beautiful. Very well done Trailmaker.
  • 01-31-2013
    Riverbend Bicycles
    Excellent craftmanship and a beautiful paint job. If my builds turned out that nice, I'd have a hard time riding them. I hope that first scratch doesn't hurt too much. Great job.
  • 02-01-2013
    Velobike
    Nice looking bike with a difference. Like Riverbend I'd be scared to scratch it too :)
  • 02-01-2013
    ozzybmx
    Thats an absolute gem Trailmaker ! A work of art indeed.
  • 02-01-2013
    nvphatty
    I concur with the other gents here in that it's a stellar build.


    Do let me know how the brakes get along as i have the same except with magura storm sl rotors and i'm having the turkey warble screech both F&R.
  • 02-01-2013
    smithcreek
    A true craftsman! Thanks for sharing.
  • 02-01-2013
    petey15
    So beautiful!! Can't wait to hear how it rides!
  • 02-01-2013
    brknspk
    Beautiful work John. Your shop looks cold.

    btw: I have spoke protectors on all of my bikes too. I've dropped a chain in between the cassette and spokes more than once. I now use Mavic spoke guards which are smaller but keep the chain from falling in there. Since everyone pulls them off of their wheels when buying at the shop, I get as many of them as I want for free.
  • 02-01-2013
    SmooveP
    Sweet!
    That's a lot of curves. Barely a straight run of tubing anywhere on that thing. Only the headtube stands in the way of the all-curvy frame.

    As for spoke guards, someone needs to make a small-diameter carbon one so they're not so "fred".
  • 02-01-2013
    brknspk
    1 Attachment(s)
    I don't mean to detract from the OP, but I would like to note that the Mavic spoke guard IS small. It's plastic though, but I can't imagine there would be any significant weight savings if it were carbon.

    I hear a lot of people say that they don't need spoke guards because their derailleur is adjusted correctly, but it only takes one smack on a rock or log for that to no longer hold true.
  • 02-01-2013
    EPcycles
    :thumbsup:
  • 02-02-2013
    TrailMaker
    OK, JoeG;

    Just for you, I fixed it. :p I never really thought about it that much, to be honest. I just knew I "needed" one there. One of those little compromises you have to make sometimes. I looked at it a bit, and realized it is only the tight area right at the base of the spokes that is vulnerable. The portion outside the diameter of the cassette was redundant, so I trimmed it off.

    NVPhatty - Brake howl indeed. On my other Fatty (Trailmaker #1 - the Humvee) I get the howl from the front brakes only. I am convinced it is the fork that is to blame. Heavy braking is fine, but light braking sets up a strong resonance. Sometime I will get around to filling a fork leg with expanding foam and see if that cures it. Beyond that, it is down to playing the rotor game to see if there is a design that doesn't cause the problem. I have these brakes on all my suspension bikes and they don't do it.
  • 02-02-2013
    AndrewQ
    Awesome work, it's nice to see an original fat bike.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    OK, JoeG;

    Brake howl indeed. On my other Fatty (Trailmaker #1 - the Humvee) I get the howl from the front brakes only. I am convinced it is the fork that is to blame. Heavy braking is fine, but light braking sets up a strong resonance. Sometime I will get around to filling a fork leg with expanding foam and see if that cures it. Beyond that, it is down to playing the rotor game to see if there is a design that doesn't cause the problem. I have these brakes on all my suspension bikes and they don't do it.

    Just FYI, filling the fork with expandable foam likely won't fix it. Adding damping material to the fork can help, but that's not very practical due to weight and limited access. Assuming your brakes are set up properly and rotors are straight, I've found the easiest way to get rid of noise is to swap to a different brand of brakes. :eekster:
  • 02-02-2013
    nvphatty
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    OK,
    NVPhatty - Brake howl indeed. On my other Fatty (Trailmaker #1 - the Humvee) I get the howl from the front brakes only. I am convinced it is the fork that is to blame. Heavy braking is fine, but light braking sets up a strong resonance. Sometime I will get around to filling a fork leg with expanding foam and see if that cures it. Beyond that, it is down to playing the rotor game to see if there is a design that doesn't cause the problem. I have these brakes on all my suspension bikes and they don't do it.

    ahhhh ha you touch on an aspect i've given thought to as well. During my rides i pay more and more attention when possible to fork (WB snowpac) deflection and frankly it's serious. That said my rear setup does the same with minimal or no deflection when applied. Is pad/rotor compatibility a viable issue or should any combo function properly?? I've been through 2 semi metallic pad sets F&R with more diligent break-in with the 2nd set but with no success. I've considered organics with new rotors as an option but to think of the cost to experiment is mind numbing.
  • 02-02-2013
    nvphatty
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AndrewQ View Post
    Assuming your brakes are set up properly and rotors are straight, I've found the easiest way to get rid of noise is to swap to a different brand of brakes. :eekster:

    Certainly an option but in all honesty can one purchase such a product and have a reasonable expectation they will function properly without resorting to 'buying another setup' or two??
  • 02-02-2013
    TrailMaker
    Hey;

    I have run nothing but Hayes brakes for many years. All brakes make a fuss at one time or another, but I have always been able to remedy them with basic reset of the system (scuff, clean, align, re-bed). I have not had this problem previously. The only operative difference here is the fork, hence my assumption that it is the culprit. The fact that you can also feel the vibration, hear the "moan", and see the fork resonating lends more support to the theory. I can very easily fill the left leg with expanding foam, given all the bottle bosses available. It doesn't weigh enough to worry about.

    We'll see. If this new ride does the same thing, it will more or less prove my theory.
  • 02-02-2013
    crashtestdummy
    Beautiful bike TrailMaker, I guess you now have time to start on mine.

    I have an 8" rotor on my FS bike. The first one that I put on made so much noise I found myself not using the front brake. I talked to the manufacturer at Interbike and he told me that no matter what he has tried, from grinding to heating to hammering, some discs howl. He told me to send it back and he would send me a replacement. The replacement has been noise free for 6+ years.
  • 02-02-2013
    bad andy
    Meet Trailmaker #2 - The Kroozer!
    Absolutely gorgeous!
  • 02-02-2013
    vikb
    I'm impressed - great work!... :thumbsup: