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  1. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by msedbaue View Post
    Went for it tonight. Rides great!

    Attachment 924567
    Any issues with the Race Face 1x setup? Any dropped chains?

  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywardx View Post
    Any issues with the Race Face 1x setup? Any dropped chains?
    Non yet - Its been working great. It is a Narrow Wide ring.
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  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by msedbaue View Post
    Non yet - Its been working great. It is a Narrow Wide ring.
    Cool...thanks...Going to set a Night-Train the same way. Hows the gearing feel overall with a 30t? or is that a 32t?

  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywardx View Post
    Cool...thanks...Going to set a Night-Train the same way. Hows the gearing feel overall with a 30t? or is that a 32t?
    Its a 32t. I have a few friends running similar gearing on their pugs through the winter, so I thinking it will be ok. We will see when it comes to some deep snow if I can push through!
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  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by msedbaue View Post
    Its a 32t. I have a few friends running similar gearing on their pugs through the winter, so I thinking it will be ok. We will see when it comes to some deep snow if I can push through!
    Ya Ive been running a 32t on my Specialized EVO HT 1X with a 11-36 out back and feel rite at home with it, but that's also a 25 pound bike so I'm thinking a 30t might be a better fit for me considering the weight of these fat bikes.

  6. #406
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    Goddamnit - second ride on the Lurch and flatted BOTH tires. That'll teach me to ride tubes. Conversion is going to happen earlier than expected.

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by djrez4 View Post
    Goddamnit - second ride on the Lurch and flatted BOTH tires. That'll teach me to ride tubes. Conversion is going to happen earlier than expected.
    Which method do you plan to use?
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  8. #408
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    I just got done re-doing my HL-80's/snowshoe 4.5's tubeless on my Lurch (the hl-80 is the common BD rim). No pics, as it is the same as the pics on the previous page. Replaced the stock rim strip with tye-dye duct tape and secured down with clear packing tape (stock rim strips weigh a whopping 160 g). Then, I put down three layers of the blue sil-foam (a little thicker than the pink) to build up the middle. Used the split tube method and a little soapy water in a spray bottle, and the tire seated no problem. I used a compressor, but it probably would've seated with a floor pump. Re-broke the bead (don't have removable cores), added 5 oz. stans, re-pumped, and was riding 5 minutes later. I've tried 2 different tape methods and both were horrible failures. FYI - do not use CO2 to fill your tires with Stans's. Little did I know, CO2 causes the latex to set up. Within 4 days of setting up tubeless last time (and using CO2 from my keg fridge bottle to seat the beads), the solutions separated into one giant wad of bubble gum and a bunch of useless ammonia water - thus the tubeless redo today.

  9. #409
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    The United Parcel Service dropped off a purple nurple grape soda 22m extra large bike off today. I took it out for a hot lap. I'm 6'3" and wear 34" length trousers.

    The bike had a few minor scrapes, and there was a hole in the box at the rear derailleur. The derailleur hanger was bent pretty bad, but it was coaxed right back into shape with an 8" adjustable.

    Does anybody fancy stories, photos and or opinions about the size for riders my height? Keep in mind that I'm really a road cyclist who uses a mountain bike for railroad grades when it rains and snows, I don't jump, ride those narrow hilly bumpy trails. I only ride a railroad grade. It's smooth enough that I also take my road bike on it with 28mm tires. Hence my needs probably differ from somebody who does a lot of those technical trail type riding.

    Cheers,
    appalachian_kamper

  10. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appalachian_Kamper View Post
    The United Parcel Service dropped off a purple nurple grape soda 22m extra large bike off today. I took it out for a hot lap. I'm 6'3" and wear 34" length trousers.

    The bike had a few minor scrapes, and there was a hole in the box at the rear derailleur. The derailleur hanger was bent pretty bad, but it was coaxed right back into shape with an 8" adjustable.

    Does anybody fancy stories, photos and or opinions about the size for riders my height? Keep in mind that I'm really a road cyclist who uses a mountain bike for railroad grades when it rains and snows, I don't jump, ride those narrow hilly bumpy trails. I only ride a railroad grade. It's smooth enough that I also take my road bike on it with 28mm tires. Hence my needs probably differ from somebody who does a lot of those technical trail type riding.

    Cheers,
    appalachian_kamper
    I suppose it doesn't hurt to get more information from a different perspective! Whats your intended use for the lurch? I would email BD about your derailleur. they may be able to help.
    2012 Pure Fix SS
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  11. #411
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    Does anybody fancy stories, photos and or opinions about the size for riders my height?
    Whatever is comfortable for the riding you do, so longer and taller for easier riding where you'll just be sitting and spinning, shorter for more agility if you plan to be moving around a lot while you move. I went with a shorter frame because I do want mnine for playing around, like a really fat BMXer.

    Why does a roadie want a fatty anywho?

    I can't imagine what your going to think of five inch tires, it's gonna feel like your riding through quicksand

    If you already have the 22" frame, what are you asking about specifically? Are you more interested in knowing about setting it up??

  12. #412
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywardx View Post
    Any issues with the Race Face 1x setup? Any dropped chains?
    I just took a raceface/wolftooth setup off my xc bike. I ate through 2 cassettes, 3 chains, 1 rear derailleur clutch (xt) and 1 34t narrow wide cog in about 700 miles according to strava. It was nice, but the drive train wear was crazy. I washed and oiled my chain religiously. Went back to 2x10 and am happy as a clam. Will be interesting to see what I get out of this drive train.

    I got my lurch and got it built yesterday. I rode it around for about a mile. The cranks are super wide, will be interesting to ride clipless.

    My bike was pretty banged up and BD insulted me with a $30 cosmetic only refund. I responded that I thought that was insulting because the crank, front wheel and frame were all pretty beat up. They then stepped up to $50 and said that's all they could do. Oh well. I'll get a ride on it hopefully tomorrow or Sunday, post pictures of damage, weigh wheels before and after tubeless conversion and respond with my thoughts.

  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by msedbaue View Post
    I suppose it doesn't hurt to get more information from a different perspective! Whats your intended use for the lurch? I would email BD about your derailleur. they may be able to help.
    Thank you for your response. As I've stated previously, I intend to use it on a railroad grade only. I sometimes have four or five miles of roadway to ride until I get to the rails to trails. The trail is flat due to following the creek. I believe it only rises 80' in its entire length of ten miles. It will also become my rain/snow bike. Further still, I have two trails within 15 miles of my house that are 50 miles round trip each, both being former railroad lines as well, and I do ride year round every day regardless of whether it's 100 Fahrenheit or -10. I care little if it's bucketing, freezing rain, or snowing.

    I'd e-mail BikesDirect, but after reading Utahbikemike's post, I don't feel interested. I am more function over fashion. I'll beat the bike up in due time myself. I fixed the derailleur hanger myself. It was bent hard enough that it wouldn't shift into the two smallest gears on the cassette. I've built a few bikes in my time, and I have always done all my own work, so I took off the derailleur, clamped an 8" adjustable to the hanger, and straightened it myself. When I put it back together, it shifted fine through all the gears, so Rob is your father's brother.

    Since I came from road bikes, it was rather strange to pedal such a wide spaced crankset. I had the sensation that I was on the doctor's table, and my legs were in those menacing looking stirrups. I got used to it quickly, and when I later went on a trip with my road bike, the transition back made me feel like I was pigeon toed...

    I have more than ten acres to ride on with our property and that of the neighbor's. About six or seven of that is mowed field. I had a 2006 Trek 820 with 2.5" tires. It was rather slow to ride through the yard to the neighbor's. The Lurch just floated over the grass with a lot less effort than my old mountain bike when I transitioned from the driveway to the field. Additionally, the neighbor has a huge sand pit where her pool used to be. The pit was recently weeded, so the sand was churned up and soft. I easily rode across it. That would have bogged down my old mountain bike with 2.5" tires.

    I rode the rail trail with the Lurch today. It's 10 miles each way. I neither had a cyclometer nor a watch, but it felt just a tad slower than my road bike. I think some of it had to do with the high and wide cassette. I suspect a tighter road cassette will solve some of this, but I don't expect it to be as fast as my road bike when the trail's in good condition. Cyclists share the trail with equestrian traffic, so after a cavalcade goes through, I'm sure the Lurch will be faster across the washboard effect the horses create.

    Since I ride less than a +/- 1 grade, the weight of the bike wasn't as noticeable as I'd suspected. There's a definite drag, but it's not that bad. My biggest complaint is the high and wide cassette drove me to distraction. The 11 - 36 10 speed gearing is going to have to fly. I'll try a road cassette with more reasonable gearing for my riding. Either a 12 - 23 or 12 - 26 'cause the stock selection really left me wanting, as I frequently found myself stuck between one gear that was too low and the next jump was too high.

    Is it me, or does that heavy wheel spinning at 20 - 30 mph give a lot of gyroscopic effects? I had to use noticeable effort at those speeds to get it to turn. At low speed, the thing possesses a Mack truck turn radius compared to my 1984 Trek 760 and 1990 Trek 1000, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, 'cause it was nice for a change to be on a bike that's not so damned skittish.

    Bike fit: Since I am riding railroad grades, I obviously don't need a small frame. Moreover, I'm sick and tired of brick and motor shops trying to shoe horn me into a small frame 'cause that's what the pros are riding. After 35 years of buying the occasional new bike or having a sales rep tell me to ditch my 25 and 30 year old road bikes to get something new, I skipped the local bike shops and bought my first online bike.

    I was a bit concerned that the XL 22M Lurch was going to be too big for me 'cause I am 6' 2 1/2" tall with a 34" inseam in trousers. I can stand flat footed over the bike at the headset, so this thing is not too big for me. I wanted to put that out there in case there are others who're curious. I don't have a problem putting a foot down. It feels smaller than my 60cm Trek 1000 and 62cm Trek 760.

    When I got stuck between gears, I noticed it's rather bouncy. It felt similar to my first mountain bike that suffered from shock bob when I got out of the saddle to ascend hills. I put a rigid fork on the previous bike to solve my problem. Perhaps better riding technique or the road cassette and or tire pressure changes may solve it.

    Photos of the minor damage:

    The Lurch Lounge-damage-2-.jpg
    The Lurch Lounge-damage-5-.jpgThe Lurch Lounge-damage-6-.jpg

    *Note, the minor cosmetic dulling of the paint looks much worse than what the photos show. Some 2000 grit wet sanding and then buffing compound would easily take it out in my limited auto body/painting experience. As stated previously, I don't care about the damage. It's a bike to be used... Your views may vary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Whatever is comfortable for the riding you do, so longer and taller for easier riding where you'll just be sitting and spinning, shorter for more agility if you plan to be moving around a lot while you move. I went with a shorter frame because I do want mnine for playing around, like a really fat BMXer.
    These are exactly my thoughts, and I couldn't agree more.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Why does a roadie want a fatty anywho?
    They say a photo's worth 1,000 words, so this is my reason.

    The Lurch Lounge-2008_01040041_zpse1d795a5.jpg

    If you care to read more, Wouldn't you agree that bikes are fun to ride? Personally, I don't care what they are, but my trail riding isn't much different than my road riding with the exception that I don't have to deal with hills on the trails. I go from point A to point B as fast as I can. Additionally, this past winter, we had 30 days of snow and ice cover. Then it warmed and melted it away. One week later, it snowed once or twice a week for the next two months. Granted they were small storms, but with 0 - 10 daytime high temperatures, it didn't take long to accumulate a 2 foot snow base, and I know people ride snowmobile on the trail, so they keep it somewhat packed. If that doesn't work, I'll chain the tires and ride it on the road. That's not an option with my road bikes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I can't imagine what your going to think of five inch tires, it's gonna feel like your riding through quicksand
    You know, I worried about that myself, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. My biggest gripe is the cassette that I wrote about earlier. It is noticeable. The weight of the bike is horrible going up hills, which I don't often do. Once on the trail, I get up to speed, and just hold it, so once it's accelerated up to speed, it's not as hard to maintain as I thought it was going to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    If you already have the 22" frame, what are you asking about specifically? Are you more interested in knowing about setting it up??
    I think I've already addressed these questions, so I'll cut the less patient a break. Thanks for responding to my post.

    One last photo for the girls:

    The Lurch Lounge-005_zpse0e64625.jpg

    Cheers,
    appalachian kamper
    Last edited by Appalachian_Kamper; 09-19-2014 at 08:09 PM. Reason: Obviously, I'm not a Rhodes scholar

  14. #414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utahbikemike View Post
    I just took a raceface/wolftooth setup off my xc bike. I ate through 2 cassettes, 3 chains, 1 rear derailleur clutch (xt) and 1 34t narrow wide cog in about 700 miles according to strava. It was nice, but the drive train wear was crazy. I washed and oiled my chain religiously. Went back to 2x10 and am happy as a clam. Will be interesting to see what I get out of this drive train.
    Im curious to why you think you damaged your components so much? Any thoughts?
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  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appalachian_Kamper View Post
    The United Parcel Service dropped off a purple nurple grape soda 22m extra large bike off today. I took it out for a hot lap. I'm 6'3" and wear 34" length trousers.

    The bike had a few minor scrapes, and there was a hole in the box at the rear derailleur. The derailleur hanger was bent pretty bad, but it was coaxed right back into shape with an 8" adjustable.

    Does anybody fancy stories, photos and or opinions about the size for riders my height? Keep in mind that I'm really a road cyclist who uses a mountain bike for railroad grades when it rains and snows, I don't jump, ride those narrow hilly bumpy trails. I only ride a railroad grade. It's smooth enough that I also take my road bike on it with 28mm tires. Hence my needs probably differ from somebody who does a lot of those technical trail type riding.

    Cheers,
    appalachian_kamper
    Wow. I'm also a similar story. But am 6" and ordered a 20" blue but instead am getting black because BD can't find the blue one in their warehouse. My black will be here Wednesday. I too am mostly a road rider and do rails to trail and with a hybrid road bike. I rarely do mountain biking but may get more into it. I mostly bought the lurch for winter snow riding.

    Thanks for all the posts. Excited to get my bike and assemble. Also am going tubeless as well so appreciate all the early people's feedback.

  16. #416
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdkjr View Post
    Wow. I'm also a similar story. But am 6" and ordered a 20" blue but instead am getting black because BD can't find the blue one in their warehouse. My black will be here Wednesday. I too am mostly a road rider and do rails to trail and with a hybrid road bike. I rarely do mountain biking but may get more into it. I mostly bought the lurch for winter snow riding.

    Thanks for all the posts. Excited to get my bike and assemble. Also am going tubeless as well so appreciate all the early people's feedback.
    You're welcome. Now addressing the bolded comments, now you've done it! First road bikes, second hybrids, now a mountain bike, soon it will be another mountain bike, then maybe a cyclocross, and I've just got to try one of those down hill trails... Hahaha, it's like eating sweets, you can't have just one! Proceed with caution.

    I bet the 20" frame will fit you well.

    Cheers,
    appalachian kamper

  17. #417
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    Quote Originally Posted by msedbaue View Post
    Im curious to why you think you damaged your components so much? Any thoughts?
    Instead of downshifting, I'd stand and crank because the gears were so far apart. When I was going downhill I was in the 11t cassette gear 99% of the time because I could never get the 13 and 15 to shift properly or reliably once I had more than 100 miles on a cassette. The narrow wide ring collects grime like a magnet and packs it in the chain everywhere.. It is not designed to shed mud at all. (Some companies are putting groves in them this year to help with that)

    I'm not going to lie, I'm hard on components but I maintain and take care of my stuff with a level of ocd. I'm the kind of guy that waxes my frames.

    If you're riding relatively flat stuff the 1x10 is nice. Just be aware it takes a lot more maintenance. My climbs are usually 1500-2500ft of vert over 12-25 miles. If you're curious and want my strava link I can post it, but I'm having issues with copy/paste on my phone right now

  18. #418
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    PS, here's a pic of my bike all built. Ordered a carbon seat post, carbon bar and homebrew stuff to swap over to tubeless should be here Wednesday.

  19. #419
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywardx View Post
    Ya Ive been running a 32t on my Specialized EVO HT 1X with a 11-36 out back and feel rite at home with it, but that's also a 25 pound bike so I'm thinking a 30t might be a better fit for me considering the weight of these fat bikes.

    Had my LBS set mine up with 30 x 11-40. Works perfectly. No dropped chains. So much fun climbing stuff.

  20. #420
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cody01 View Post
    So now that some you have a Lurch maybe you can help with sizing. I'm 5'9" and overweight currently with a 30" inseam pants. Should I get a small or a medium?
    I'm the same height with 30-31 inseam. The bikes seem to run small to me. I'm glad I went with the 20". Fits perfectly. Handles devine Bike fit is such a personal thing. Someone much taller than me might prefer a smaller frame. I did switch the stem to an 80mm with a slight rise.

  21. #421
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    Orange touch up paint code

    So after only a few rides, I have noticed my front brake cable has rubbed through the paint where it routes behind the head tube. Bikes Direct says the paint code is "YS740". Would I just take this code to an auto paint supply store to color match?
    I have scoured the web for sites that allow you to enter your automotive paint code, without results. In the mean time, I have put clear automotive film under cables where rubbing may happen.

  22. #422
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    Quick ride today..no rear dropout slippage

    Motobecane Lurch by Sven98, on Flickr
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    Lurch Fatbike

  23. #423
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywardx View Post
    Any issues with the Race Face 1x setup? Any dropped chains?
    Also forgot to mention, you start dropping chains when the narrow-wide wears out.. even with a clutch derailleur

    Anyone seen a carbon fork being made for 150mm front hubs? Looks like all of them on ebay are for 135mm hubs.

  24. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utahbikemike View Post
    Also forgot to mention, you start dropping chains when the narrow-wide wears out.. even with a clutch derailleur
    I think the application of your 1x10 to mine is apples to oranges. 700 miles on your xc bike with tons of climbing/thrashing is pretty different than commuting to work in the winter and riding through the snow! Parts wear, but I think from an overall durability standpoint the 1x10 should work nicely for my application.
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  25. #425
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    Quote Originally Posted by sven98 View Post
    Quick ride today..no rear dropout slippage
    I sometimes skid my rear tire to give an appropriate warning for the overly sensitive types our world seems to be filled with. Skidding the tire seems to be the least offensive method of all means I've tried over the years, so I lean on the front tire to get as much weight off the rear tire as possible, and lock it up the rear tire for a half second. I was trying to give warning to three women who were taking up the entire 12' width of the trail. The flippin' rear wheel came out of the drop outs. The noise of the rear tire skidding 'cause it fell out scared the women to death, so naturally, I got chastised as I passed them That's a new one for me, and I've done a lot of stupid things on a bicycle...

    Cheers,
    appalachian kamper
    Last edited by Appalachian_Kamper; 09-20-2014 at 12:18 PM. Reason: No Rhodes scholar here

  26. #426
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    The Lurch Lounge

    You never hear of that happening w/Surly because they use Shimano skewers. Hope makes a 190 qr


    Pedaling

  27. #427
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    Here is BDs replacement for my bent skewer! Seems to be much higher quality, and red!
    The Lurch Lounge-img_1703.jpg
    The Lurch Lounge-img_1704.jpg
    2012 Pure Fix SS
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    2013 Air 9 Carbon SS
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  28. #428
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appalachian_Kamper View Post
    I sometimes skid my rear tire to give an appropriate warning for the overly sensitive types our world seems to be filled with. Skidding the tire seems to be the least offensive method of all means I've tried over the years, so I lean on the front tire to get as much weight off the rear tire as possible, and lock it up the rear tire for a half second. I was trying to give warning to three women who were taking up the entire 12' width of the trail. The flippin' rear wheel came out of the drop outs. The noise of the rear tire skidding 'cause it fell out scared the women to death, so naturally, I got chastised as I passed them That's a new one for me, and I've done a lot of stupid things on a bicycle...

    Cheers,
    appalachian kamper
    Oh man you must live in my town. 10-12' trail and two women with asses like 100lb feed sacks taking up all of it. I never thought of locking up a tire as I hate to slow my forward momentum. I do however dive my bike off into the grass and bushes to go around. That always makes them think a bear or mountain lion is about to get them.

  29. #429
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    Lurch in the wild

    The Lurch Lounge-img_20140920_163632.jpg
    From today's ride.

  30. #430
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    The Lurch Lounge


    Orange you happy to see a lil of NYC?

  31. #431
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    From today's ride.
    Awesome!

  32. #432
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appalachian_Kamper View Post
    I sometimes skid my rear tire to give an appropriate warning for the overly sensitive types our world seems to be filled with. Skidding the tire seems to be the least offensive method of all means I've tried over the years, so I lean on the front tire to get as much weight off the rear tire as possible, and lock it up the rear tire for a half second. I was trying to give warning to three women who were taking up the entire 12' width of the trail. The flippin' rear wheel came out of the drop outs. The noise of the rear tire skidding 'cause it fell out scared the women to death, so naturally, I got chastised as I passed them That's a new one for me, and I've done a lot of stupid things on a bicycle...

    Cheers,
    appalachian kamper
    I very much like skidding and scaring the crap out of people that insist on wearing two ear buds. They usually don't hear me if I give them an "on your left" anyways.

    Had a jogger jump 3ft off the trail into scrub oak and get stuck. I laughed and felt bad, but you need to pay attention sometimes.

  33. #433
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    High pitched squeak from hubs?

    Anyone else getting this? Started in the rear hub a couple of rides ago then disappeared....now it is in the front. Very annoying, maybe it will go away on its own. If not, what would be a fix?

  34. #434
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickngas View Post
    Anyone else getting this? Started in the rear hub a couple of rides ago then disappeared....now it is in the front. Very annoying, maybe it will go away on its own. If not, what would be a fix?
    spray the rubber gasket thingy with a triflow type lube where the rubber gasket thingy meets the hub. use a flat head screwdriver to get the lube to get in there a bit better.

    rog

  35. #435
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    spray the rubber gasket thingy with a triflow type lube where the rubber gasket thingy meets the hub. use a flat head screwdriver to get the lube to get in there a bit better.

    rog
    Thanks Rog, sprayed some Gibbs lube on the gaskets and it cleared right up!

  36. #436
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickngas View Post
    Thanks Rog, sprayed some Gibbs lube on the gaskets and it cleared right up!
    you're so welcome.

    glad it worked for ya!

    rog

  37. #437
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    Damn you all! I saw a fat bike on the beach yesterday and had to check them out. I spent the last couple hours reading up on the BD Lurch here and before I realized it I done dinged my credit card for a black 22.

    I now need a good cover story for my wife. I don't think "it followed me home " will work this time

    BTW Only the Black was left in 22" at 7pm Sunday.

  38. #438
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    Damn you all! I saw a fat bike on the beach yesterday and had to check them out. I spent the last couple hours reading up on the BD Lurch here and before I realized it I done dinged my credit card for a black 22.

    I now need a good cover story for my wife. I don't think "it followed me home " will work this time

    BTW Only the Black was left in 22" at 7pm Sunday.
    Congrats, and welcome to the Lurch Lounge.

    Oh and pics or it didn't happen

  39. #439
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    Minor Lurch Frame Mod

    I wanted to put a rear rack on my lurch, but there were no attachment points for the front stays. The alternative was rather inelegant (zip ties and duct tape), so I decided to just bite the bullet.

    The Lurch Lounge-20140921_02.jpg

    The Lurch Lounge-20140921_04.jpg

    For anyone interested, this rattle can is a dead nuts color match, by chance.

    The Lurch Lounge-20140921_05.jpg

    I top-coated it with this, to blend everything together.

    The Lurch Lounge-20140921_06.jpg

    I'm pretty sure my aftermarket coating system is more durable than the stock paint job, which is not. Durable.

    I'm also pretty sure the above statement will get nurse ben all worked up, given his contention that this bike is one hundred percent exactly equivalent to the powder coated surly, while saving the buyer hundreds, if not thousands.

    Whatevs.

  40. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by spovegas View Post
    I'm pretty sure my aftermarket coating system is more durable than the stock paint job, which is not. Durable.

    I'm also pretty sure the above statement will get nurse ben all worked up, given his contention that this bike is one hundred percent exactly equivalent to the powder coated surly, while saving the buyer hundreds, if not thousands.

    Whatevs.
    After just two rides, my front brake cable sawed through the clear coat, paint and primer behind my head tube. No doubt this is not powder coated!

  41. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickngas View Post
    After just two rides, my front brake cable sawed through the clear coat, paint and primer behind my head tube. !
    I had the same thing happen. My headtube is nearly down to bare metal in some places. When I have the time I'm going to strip the bike down and have it powdercoated.

  42. #442
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    I had the same problem with regards to the cables rubbing the paint. I noticed it early and took both brake cables off and shortened them a little which helped. Did not shorten the shift cable housing however. I went to the lbs and while getting some bottle cages and a pump, asked for something that may help the cable rub issue. They ended up giving me these clear rubber/plastic type adhesive pads for free (awesome). They are bearly noticeable and have completely solved this issue for me. Just fyi, I have the size 16" frame.
    Last edited by Apeking101; 09-23-2014 at 11:52 PM.

  43. #443
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    Wow on the UPS truck already! I might be riding by Friday. All my bike kit and parts are still up in NY. I'll have to find some cheapo pedals so I can ride it this coming weekend

  44. #444
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    I was able to take my fatty out for a ride yesterday...Oh boy do I love this bike!! It rolls over just about everything, climbs well, and attracts all kinds of comments. What an attention whore!! I can't wait to get out and ride it some more. I've kept it mostly stock, only thing changed is the seat, stem, brake levers and rim strips. I've ordered some q lite tubes hoping to drop a little weight, but if they don't work out, no big deal. I will say that the stock tube is ginormous!! It's pretty comical once it's out of the tire. Anyway, happy riding to all!! Enjoy your fatties!! FYI, I'm riding the 22" frame. I'm 6'4, don't know my inseam, but I have a little bit of room for standover. Overall, the geometry feels like a smaller bike. It's not uncomfortable at all, and I enjoy riding it, so that's all that matters.


    [IMG]


  45. #445
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    Quote Originally Posted by big boy phil View Post
    I was able to take my fatty out for a ride yesterday...Oh boy do I love this bike!! It rolls over just about everything, climbs well, and attracts all kinds of comments. What an attention whore!! I can't wait to get out and ride it some more. I've kept it mostly stock, only thing changed is the seat, stem, brake levers and rim strips. I've ordered some q lite tubes hoping to drop a little weight, but if they don't work out, no big deal. I will say that the stock tube is ginormous!! It's pretty comical once it's out of the tire. Anyway, happy riding to all!! Enjoy your fatties!! FYI, I'm riding the 22" frame. I'm 6'4, don't know my inseam, but I have a little bit of room for standover. Overall, the geometry feels like a smaller bike. It's not uncomfortable at all, and I enjoy riding it, so that's all that matters.


    [IMG]

    That second to last pic is great!....thanks for sharing

  46. #446
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    Wow on the UPS truck already! I might be riding by Friday. All my bike kit and parts are still up in NY. I'll have to find some cheapo pedals so I can ride it this coming weekend
    Jealous. I originally ordered a blue one on 9/12/2014. Didn't hear from BD until I called them early last week asking whats up with shipping. That was when they said they couldn't find it and were sending me a black. That one went out on 9/18/2014 but my delivery date isn't until 9/24. Amazed you are getting yours just one day later - you must be closer to Texas than me (I'm in Michigan)! That is awesome. Happy riding

  47. #447
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    Paint is paint, powdercoat is paint, it's more durable than spray on paint, but it still scratches, chips, and wears off.

    I've splurged for powder many times, but it's really not worth the trouble.

    As for spray on paint being as durable as factory paint, not likely.

    I ride my bikes, they never look new again, so why pretend? All I worry about is rust.

    I still don't understand why anyone would but a cheap ass fat bike, complain about it's weaknesses, then start making upgrades.

    For anyone reading this thread who is on the fence about buying a bike from Motobecane, please pay attention to your needs and desires, this bike is not an end all and be all to fat bikes. It is a decent bike for a decent price.

    For perspective, my 650 FS cost more than four times as much as my Lurch.

    And I like them both :-)

  48. #448
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    I wanted some three season tires for use until it snows, was talking to Shiggy about the Floater, read the reviews, and ordered a set from the UK. Amazingly they arrived in four days.

    I have two rides on them so far, they are great tires, zero autosteer, no issues with steering under hard braking, very nimble for a big tire.

    I highly recommend them!

    I also went to a short stem and that really quickened the action :-)

  49. #449
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    It's not a "cheap ass fatbike". That's the mongoose bikes. I'd consider these midrange.

    Why upgrade? That's half of the fun with a new bike. Tinkering, setting it up and customizing it.

    Is the bike rideable as is? Sure. Do I need a carbon bar and seapost? No, but it makes it a hell of a lot nicer to ride. It also makes it mine.

    From my rainy ride on Sunday. It was pouring but it was one of the most fun rides I've had in recent memory.

  50. #450
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    Everyone upgrades, no matter what they paid or what brand the bike is. That is part of the fun. Ride.

  51. #451
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickngas View Post
    Everyone upgrades, no matter what they paid or what brand the bike is. That is part of the fun. Ride.
    Agreed!
    2012 Pure Fix SS
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  52. #452
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    Good job!

    Added some personal motivation on the Lurch to match my single speed tonight!

    The Lurch Lounge-img_1729.jpg
    The Lurch Lounge-img_1727.jpg
    2012 Pure Fix SS
    2013 Speed Concept 1x11
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  53. #453
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    I think one of the most frustrating things I've ever done is yet to convert this bike to tubeless. I tried to get this thing to seal for two and a half hours before throwing the tube back in. I did measure it before and after tubeless and found it saved 340 grams per tire.

    I was unable to get it to seal. For some reason it leaked between the butt joint in the rim and out of the rim strip. Going to pick up some 24" tubes and go ghetto tomorrow.

  54. #454
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    I spent all afternoon unsuccessfully trying to set my 2 Lurch's up tubeless. On mine, I replaced the rim tape with some really tight strapping tape, then used window foam and finally gorilla glue. No dice. I hear tiny leaks around the rim holes and no amount of stans shaking seems to seal these up.

    So on my wife's lurch, I left the rim strip in and just added weather stripping to the edges and then gorilla taped each side with 1" and then finished up with 1.8" gorilla tape in the center connecting the two side pieces. The bead seats fine on hers, but somehow air and stans are getting through and coming out the rim and spoke holes.

    On both of the bikes, I covered the rim joint area with tape on the inside, but somehow I think it's still getting though. Just not sure how.

  55. #455
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    I've put quite a bit of time into ghetto tubeless fat setups over the past couple of years, to the point I think I have kind of a "feel" for what will/won't, does/doesn't work. And when I started playing with the tires and rims that came on my lurch, there is just no way that you're going to get things to seal tubeless without going split tube, IMHO.

    I have a few different tires and tubes in my possession that I am playing with and swapping in/out, so going tubeless doesn't make much sense for me at the moment, but if I were to go that route, it would surely be split tube.

    (I'm sure that the fact that I don't believe the stock setup is awesome and totally conducive to plug-and-play tubeless will infuriate fanboy nurse ben, so watch for the obligatory backlash. )

  56. #456
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    Yeah...I tried tubeless on the front wheel. I used clear gorilla tape and built up the center with one wrap of foam (stuffed used to seal the sill plate on a house). Couldnt get it to seal at all, even with my compressor. So...tubes for now.
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  57. #457
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    Agreed - there was no way in hell that taped tubeless will work on these rims. Split tube ghetto with 2-3 layers of sill-foam under the split tube, 5 oz stans, and you're golden. I've rode every single day since setting this up and have yet to even burp at PSI's as low at 7 on techy singletrack.

    2 week ride report - it just keeps getting funner on this thing. No mechanical issues, the wheels haven't fallen off, this is a good bike. I did run the rear wheel all the way forward in the drop-outs. It did liven up the ride, but also made it a little more harsh. The are not any clearance issues with the stock wheel/tire setup all the way forward on the 18" frame - I did have to zip tie the front derailleur housing to the seat tube, but other than than, it works fine. Bigger winter tires will require moving the wheel back a little, but not a ton.
    FYI - I made some laps on a friends Pugs over the weekend. I found it flexier than the Lurch. In some instances it felt more compliant to trail features, in others, overly flexy. Six one way, half a dozen another. Both rides were fun.

  58. #458
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    I've never let a tubeless setup beat me, but after getting more ideas from friends and 8+ hours of work I still can't get this setup to stay inflated overnight tubeless. I gave tubeless one more chance, but now I'm back to tubes. Here's what I did in case anyone wants to learn from my failures. The rim tape was removed before I started all this:

    1. Buffed shiny rim surface with light sand paper to get better tape adhesion. Sanded down some of the really sharp spoke nipples just in case they were causing holes in the tape.
    2. Clean rim with alcohol and lint free cloth.
    3. Super Glued inside of rim joint.
    4. 17mm Strapping tape in center channel between nipples. I did this first wrap extremely tight.
    5. 2 wraps of 1.88" black Gorilla tape. One on each side of the rim channel. They slightly overlap the center piece of strapping tape and sit very smooth and seemed to have a great seal with the rim.
    6. This step I haven't seen anyone else do, but it was way better than weather stripping (which seems to pack down fast). I cut a section out of a cheap Wal-Mart foam closed cell camping pad the width of the deep center rim channel (about 2 inches wide). I taped this into the center of the rim which filled everything up nicely and forces the tire toward the edge making it seat much easier (although still requires a compressor. This foam is closed cell so I didn't even bother covering it with tape. I just used a piece of gorilla tape and stretched it tight and taped over it lengthwise with a 12 inch piece of tape. I located the small gap in the camping pad over the valve hole.

    The result was slow leaks where stans bubbled out of the nipples and rim holes. It would take about 30 minutes to drop from 20 psi to 5psi. Oh well, back to tubes.

    I've ordered some "Tough and Wide 2.88 Gorilla tape" from Amazon and will try again soon once the new tape arrives. I'm hoping that one continuous piece will work better and that the multiple tape pieces may have been the source of the leaks. Just a guess though.
    Last edited by stephend9; 09-24-2014 at 12:51 PM. Reason: punctuation

  59. #459
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    Great info stephend9. Thanks for taking the time to write it up. Good luck with the wider tape.

  60. #460
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    So I am in no way a "weight weenie", but I am wondering what might be some parts of the bike to consider changing in order to drop the overall weight? I love the bike as it is now, but as we all do when we're not riding, we like to turn wrenches. So if there's any weight to be lost on the Lurch, where would you all look? I was thinking seat post, handle bars, tubes, tires, crankset?? Not really sure where else to look. Does anyone happen to know what some of the stock parts weigh?

  61. #461
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    Quote Originally Posted by big boy phil View Post
    So I am in no way a "weight weenie", but I am wondering what might be some parts of the bike to consider changing in order to drop the overall weight? I love the bike as it is now, but as we all do when we're not riding, we like to turn wrenches. So if there's any weight to be lost on the Lurch, where would you all look? I was thinking seat post, handle bars, tubes, tires, crankset?? Not really sure where else to look. Does anyone happen to know what some of the stock parts weigh?
    The frame and fork!

    Seriously though, probably post, bar & tubes are probably the cheapest grams per dollar. Going 1x will shave a pound for about $60 for a narrow-wide chainring. But your conditions/riding may not suit a 1x set-up. Crank is going to save you about 1/2 lb, but at about a $250 price tag to go to a Race Face Turbine Cinch. Brakes will save you some weight as well .

  62. #462
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    I dropped a pound by going 1x10* with a 34T narrow-wide chainring.

    *I left on the 22T chainring. I live in the mountains of Colorado, so in case I'm doing a huge climb up to a pass on a slow day I can just reach down and manually move the chainring to the 22T. There's no chain drop protection (other than the Type 2 clutch derailleur) so I will put it back on the big ring before doing any rough descending, but for normal slow climbing or snow riding I don't expect to drop a chain.

  63. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by big boy phil View Post
    So I am in no way a "weight weenie", but I am wondering what might be some parts of the bike to consider changing in order to drop the overall weight? I love the bike as it is now, but as we all do when we're not riding, we like to turn wrenches. So if there's any weight to be lost on the Lurch, where would you all look? I was thinking seat post, handle bars, tubes, tires, crankset?? Not really sure where else to look. Does anyone happen to know what some of the stock parts weigh?
    The whole bike.
    Drink beer. 'Merica!

  64. #464
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    Good luck getting the Lurch to run tubeless, I have some tubeless skills, even got my 36er wire bead to seal, but these rims no go. Perhaps with the help of a tire shop, they have very high flow to pop the bead in place.

    You can run 300gm tubes with some sealant, it's fairly light and kinda thorn resistant. So far straight tubes are working for me.

  65. #465
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    What weight

    Perhaps the best way to think about weight on a fat bike is to look at what is different between a fat bike and a non fat bike

    Tires and tubes, an extra kilo per wheel

    Rims and hubs, an extra half kilo per wheel

    The parts are inexpensive, so they probably weigh more, but when you consider all that wheel weight, losing 50gms on stem.and bars is not much.

    For sure, lose the big tubeless rotational weigh is more noticeable when riding.

    A narrower tire may not be that much lighter; the Snowshoes are ~ 1500gms, but I really noticed an increase in agility going to floaters (1450gsm)

  66. #466
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    . . . the Snowshoes are ~ 1500gms . . .
    No, they're not, ben. You're not even in the ballpark.

    The Lurch Lounge-20140910_03.jpg

    phil, the biggest bang for your buck is to drop $20 on some Q-tubes. It will buy you over a pound. That's the end of the low hanging fruit, though.

    Everything else will start to add significant expense to a budget bike, so it's up to you as to how creative you want to get and how much cash you are willing to throw at a mail-order bike to turn it into something different than it is.

    I think it's a pretty good value as-is. Yep, it's fairly heavy. I would suggest throwing some light tubes on and then just go ride. If you want a lighter fatbike, the most economical way to get there is to pony up and purchase something that has been designed to be light. Otherwise, you're just throwing good money after bad.

    I've posted crank weights and others have posted weights of other components on this thread. If you're interested in doing your homework, it's out there for the taking.

  67. #467
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    Mine were just under 1500gms, weighed em' both...my point is that the tires are not extremely heavy compared to a typical fat tire, but they are twice the weight of a typical mtb tire.

    For a budget bike it is not heavy, but if weight is an issue, then don't buy a budget bike.

    By the time you spend the cash to upgrade this bike to "lightweight", you could have purchased a higher quality bike with a better frame set.

  68. #468
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    If you want a "lightweight" bike, don't expect a fat bike to ever become a featherweight. The bikes are fat and, well, they are heavy. I have seen some in the low 20's, but like anything else, you have to pay to get certain attributes you like such as light weight carbon frames and wheels. The Specialized I test rode for a weekend was very nice, but the price was out of my range. I like my Lurch and knew going in that it would be a cheaper bike with a lower quality frameset and heavy, but for my purposes, it fits my needs therefore I am content...for now.

  69. #469
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    For a budget bike it is not heavy, but if weight is an issue, then don't buy a budget bike.

    By the time you spend the cash to upgrade this bike to "lightweight", you could have purchased a higher quality bike with a better frame set.
    ^^^Completely agree, Ben.

  70. #470
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    If I stay in the fat bike game long enough, and I use the bike as much as I think I will, my guess is that I'll go full boat and get a lightweight blinged out FS, probably have two wheel sets to make it more four season.

    I first got hooked on fat while riding muni, started with a Larry, it rolled everything, made me full like superman. I just really like the way fat tires ride, they may not be ideal for everything, but they are sure fun! I am really excited about getting my Bluto on this weekend (figures crossed).

    There's a guy in town who is trying to get a Bucksaw, I can't wait to give it a spin

  71. #471
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    I think the lurch is great "as-is". My 29er is 12 lbs lighter than the lurch and honestly I cant tell the difference while riding. Climbing seems almost easier on the lurch, especially over rooty/rocky climbs...gotta be the volume of tires and the traction they deliver. I dunno, I really like the way the lurch is and weight reduction is not really #1 priority for me. I did the normal stem/bar/grip swap, added pedals and Im done for now.
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  72. #472
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    Lurch showed up on time and in excellent condition, Two quick questions. The front brake disc bolts are those T25 Torx size?( T20 is largest I have on hand) I don't have any tire tools down here with me so I need to make a LBS run,will standard tire levers or a quik-stik remove the tires?

    Rick

  73. #473
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    Lurch showed up on time and in excellent condition, Two quick questions. The front brake disc bolts are those T25 Torx size?( T20 is largest I have on hand) I don't have any tire tools down here with me so I need to make a LBS run,will standard tire levers or a quik-stik remove the tires?
    T25 is correct. Regular or no levers should remove the tires. Mine are quite loose.
    baker

  74. #474
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    Yet another terrible ride on the Lurch ;-)

    77 and sunny by bbaker22, on Flickr

    Old Chub by bbaker22, on Flickr
    baker

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    Fat Bikes should have been called Chub Bikes!
    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    Yet another terrible ride on the Lurch ;-)

    77 and sunny by bbaker22, on Flickr

    Old Chub by bbaker22, on Flickr

  76. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    Yet another terrible ride on the Lurch ;-)

    77 and sunny by bbaker22, on Flickr

    Old Chub by bbaker22, on Flickr
    Now that seems like an awesome ride! Thanks for the pics!
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  77. #477
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    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    T25 is correct. Regular or no levers should remove the tires. Mine are quite loose.
    Thanks

  78. #478
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    Tried to split tube tonight.. Regular q tube 24x2" tube.. It wasn't wide enough and that's all the lbs by me had. What light qtube works the best in these things? Think I'm going to do a light tube with 2 oz stans (homebrew) in the tubes and forget about tubeless.

    Took this bike up and down 2k ft of vertical over 11 miles last night. Definitely has a more relaxed climbing style, you can just sit and climb over everything. Rear tire didn't wash or spin while cranking hard. Downhill reminded me quickly that the bike was rigid. With a bluto I bet this bike would be a much better descender but it's decent as-is for sure. The bb7s are actually pretty decent. Good power and great modulation.

    Next week I start getting Chinese carbon bits, which should help a bit with ride quality.

    Biggest thing I've noticed with the wide q factor is that different muscles in my butt were getting worked versus my xc bike. It hasn't been a factor other than that. Loving this bike for the money.

  79. #479
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utahbikemike View Post
    The bb7s are actually pretty decent. Good power and great modulation.

    Next week I start getting Chinese carbon bits, which should help a bit with ride quality.
    If you really want to get the most out of the BB7 brakes, swap to some Avid "speed dial" levers with the modulation adjustment. After I did this upgrade on my Lurch and trued the rotors really well I feel the stopping power is up there with my top hydraulic brakes.

    I stole a chinese carbon handlebar and seatpost off my old single speed and it really helped the feel and ride of this bike. You won't be disappointed with this upgrade on the Lurch.

  80. #480
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    Assembled my Lurch this evening. I ran into that brake rubbing issue on the rear wheel. No amount of pad adjustment or realigning the caliper would stop the rubbing. The disc was too close to the caliper and the operating pad was retracted all the way in. I just began to disassemble the caliper to sand some material off of the caliper bracket( It is much easier to sand that little aluminum bracket than the steel mount). I suddenly noticed that the caliper had sufficient clearance at the front of the caliper. After studying it a few minutes, I removed the caliper and compared the alignment of the brake caliper mount to the center line of the frame with 2 straight edges. Ha! the caliper mount is out of alignment by a good millimeter. Compare the two red circles in the photo.


    I took a 8" adjustable wrench and gave the mount a little tug to the outside and moved it a good millimeter. I bolted the caliper back on and tried aligning it again. It lined up perfectly to factory spec with no rubbing

    I'll post more pics and first ride report tomorrow.

  81. #481
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    I took a 8" adjustable wrench and gave the mount a little tug to the outside and moved it a good millimeter. I bolted the caliper back on and tried aligning it again. It lined up perfectly to factory spec with no rubbing
    Good idea. I think I'll check on my alignment the next time I have the bike up on the work stand.

    Thanks!
    baker

  82. #482
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    Was all in to buy Surly Pugs but saw Lurch on Bikesdirect....Looks like very sweet ride at amazing price! How do you all like your bikes? No winter riding for me...Just dry desert trail riding
    SWING YOUR LEG OVER IT AND PEDAL

  83. #483
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan1113 View Post
    Was all in to buy Surly Pugs but saw Lurch on Bikesdirect....Looks like very sweet ride at amazing price! How do you all like your bikes? No winter riding for me...Just dry desert trail riding
    I guess to quickly summarize this thread. Some people think they are the best, some think they are functional and a good value bike.

    Personally, I bought it to ride in the snow and have some fun when on slower group rides! I have had to make a few modifications here and there, nothing major. I really enjoy riding it! Its no beauty queen, weighs approx 38 lbs on the 22" frame.

    I can tell you this, every time I ride it I have a big smile on my face!

    I hope this helps!
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  84. #484
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    Fat bikes are heavy, but that's the price for riding fat.

    If my fat bike was my only bike, I'd spend more and get the lightest bike possible.

    For comparison, my 650fs cost $4000 plus, my Lurch cost $900.

    If you don't ride snow, you don't need 5" tires, so figure that when you pick a bike.

    If you are buying for desert riding, why go so fat, why not a plus series bike? A nice 29+, 650 +, or even a 26 + might be a better choice.

    Front suspension is worth the price, you save ~$150 getting it with the bike, but then you have to wait until December.

    I bought the Lurch for the sliding drop outs, which allow me to slide the wheel forward and reduce wheelbase for improved handling. With 4" Floaters I have a very nice handling bike, quick for a fatty, but it's still a heavy bike; I won't weigh it, what's the point?

    Sometimes it's worthwhile getting an inexpensive bike to start, especially wen you're buying into a new "style", because it's hard to know what you will like until youget a chance to do some riding.

    It's been raining, normally we are dry, the rain brings out the clay... so last night I slogged up a bunch of slimy double track that I never would have made on my skinny tires, then I connected with some swoopy single track that was a hoot on fatties, then I busted my way through a mix of double and single track all the way home, never really regretting the choice to bring a fatty.

    Tires matter, make sure you pick some that suit your needs.

  85. #485
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    Well currently ride Trek Superfly and it's great bike...There are just so many trails and areas where Fat Bikes are perfect where I live. Spending 2k plus for one is way out my budget right now so this looking like great option.
    SWING YOUR LEG OVER IT AND PEDAL

  86. #486
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    So today was first day with the Lurch. All in all very pleased with it. Dealing with Bikes Direct was painless and the bike arrived in 3 days. No damage what so ever to the bike from shipping.

    This is my first production bike since I bought a tandem in 1992. All the others I own (7 currently) are bikes I built including the frame sets.
    Having built and repaired a number of frames over the years I don't get much impressed these days about higher end production frames. I have seen just as many broken $1500 frames as $150 frames. If the welds are clean and the alignment is within a millimeter or two it will ride just fine. The Lurch has nice smooth even welds, I have seen worse on much more expensive bikes. I did a quick check on the frame with a straight edge and a fishing line. Everything looked good. no crabbing or twist I could detect. The only tweak I had to make was to the rear brake bracket mentioned in an earlier post

    Components, there is nothing I hate. The SRAM X7- X9 derailleurs and shifters are proven, they shifted quickly and reliably. The Avid brakes once adjusted worked great. The wheel set is decent I looked at the wheelset more than anything else when I was choosing which bike to order. The Novatec(JoyTech)hubs are not Hope ,Chris King or XTR's but they are a well regarded OEM hub with cartridge bearings which means I can upgrade the bearings to a high end bearing once they wear out.

    Nothing wrong with the Weimann rims, but because I ride in loose sand a lot, I may eventually change to 4" wide rims to get a broader, flatter contact patch. The rim prices are coming down and the choices are getting better, Maybe next year.

    I do have a minor gripe with the crank Q-factor which measures inside the arms about 205mm. (vs average 170 mm for MTB's) I'm long legged and it didn't cause me any knee pain after several hours of riding but it feels weird. The extra 20mm in spindle length requiring the two 10 mm spacers is IMO unnecessary. Sounds like something was misunderstood when the crank was spec'ed. There is way more than enough clearance for the crank arms and inner chain ring. This amount of spacing is not seen on the Surly Ice cream Truck nor the new Trek which both have 100mm BB's. I will probably replace the crank (~$175-$250) once these chain rings wear out.

    I didn't weight it , It feels about the same as my 38 lb tandem. More effective IMO and a helluva lot less expensive to remove several lbs from the rider than the bike.

    The changes I will make soon are swapping the saddle out for a Brooks B17 (I have an extra),different grips and adding bar ends. Pedals, I'm using a pair of $7 dept store pedals. I'm thinking of a large BMX type with SPD on one side.

    I rode it about 15 miles around town this morning to bed the brake pads and get used to it. It makes a great urban bike too. Pot holes curbs and railroad tracks matter less.

    Went to the beach this afternoon and rode another 12 miles, 6 of that into a 25-30 mph wind. I loved riding it in the sand! It easily plowed right through the loose dry stuff and handled both hard packed and soft wet sand with ease. It bought me instant cred with the Jeep and Bubba truck crowd on the far end of the island. It drew a crowd timed I stopped. I loaned it out to 4 different people to try. Hard to ride this bike and not smile!




  87. #487
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan1113 View Post
    Was all in to buy Surly Pugs but saw Lurch on Bikesdirect....Looks like very sweet ride at amazing price! How do you all like your bikes? No winter riding for me...Just dry desert trail riding
    I have only had mine for a day and I'm loving it. It is a good value for a mid-range bike. Just keep in mind you might have a couple bugs to work out for that low price.

    BTW, f you have an extra $2500 burning a hole in your pocket take a look at the Ice Cream Truck,IMO more similar in spec to the Lurch than the Pugsley

  88. #488
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    Can someone throw me a link for the lightweight qtubes? Are they just the normal 2" ones and they stretch out?

  89. #489
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utahbikemike View Post
    Can someone throw me a link for the lightweight qtubes? Are they just the normal 2" ones and they stretch out?
    This might help
    Lighter Fatbike Tube Alternatives | FAT-BIKE.COM

  90. #490
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan1113 View Post
    Well currently ride Trek Superfly and it's great bike...There are just so many trails and areas where Fat Bikes are perfect where I live. Spending 2k plus for one is way out my budget right now so this looking like great option.
    I was in the same boat! Just wanted something that wasnt really, really expensive (I realize this is relative, but anyway) that would be fun to ride. I do agree that buying a little more expensive bike will have its advantages, but if an 85 chevy will do the work, why buy a Ferrari?

    You dont need to spend many thousands to have fun on a bike.
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  91. #491
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    I do have a minor gripe with the crank Q-factor which measures inside the arms about 205mm. (vs average 170 mm for MTB's) I'm long legged and it didn't cause me any knee pain after several hours of riding but it feels weird. The extra 20mm in spindle length requiring the two 10 mm spacers is IMO unnecessary. Sounds like something was misunderstood when the crank was spec'ed. There is way more than enough clearance for the crank arms and inner chain ring. This amount of spacing is not seen on the Surly Ice cream Truck nor the new Trek which both have 100mm BB's. I will probably replace the crank (~$175-$250) once these chain rings wear out.
    We covered this one earlier in the thread. It looks weird, but it is the configuration that appears to be typical for 190mm bikes. There's clearance to move it in, but you'll create an improper chainline unless you go 1x. The chainline and 190mm was necessary for 5" tires. The Ice Cream Truck uses a wider press fit shell and the Surly OD crank which has a tweaked ring offset to accommodate.

  92. #492
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    We covered this one earlier in the thread. It looks weird, but it is the configuration that appears to be typical for 190mm bikes. There's clearance to move it in, but you'll create an improper chainline unless you go 1x. The chainline and 190mm was necessary for 5" tires. The Ice Cream Truck uses a wider press fit shell and the Surly OD crank which has a tweaked ring offset to accommodate.
    Thanks for the reply, I missed that conversation when I was reading through all the posts. I saw your link to the Race Face crank. I pretty certain what is going on is that some manufacturer(s) are sticking a longer spindle into a 70mm width crank and correcting the chainline with 10/11mm spacers.

    On my bike, Chain line at the crank as measured is ~74 mm to the inner face of the outer chainring. On the cassette from the inner face of the 5th cog to center line of the bottom bracket is a ~ 70-71 mm. The Q to the inside of the crank arms is 205 mm . Measuring across the chainstays at the tip of the crank arms I get 159 mm.

    Here is the spec drawing for the SRAM X9 with 100mm BB for fat bikes


    The X9 chain line at 69.5 mm is within 1-2 mm of the center of the cassette, no issue there. The Q-of the X9 crank arms is 179 mm which should give 10 mm of clearance at each side.

    Here is a link to the Surly OD cranks for 100mm BB. The Pugsley would fit but only 7-8 mm clearance to the Chainstays. http://surlybikes.com//uploads/downl...Dimensions.PDF

    Anything I'm missing here?

    BTW: The X5 fatbike crankset has the same specs

  93. #493
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    The Lurch Lounge

    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    Thanks for the reply, I missed that conversation when I was reading through all the posts. I saw your link to the Race Face crank. I pretty certain what is going on is that some manufacturer(s) are sticking a longer spindle into a 70mm width crank and correcting the chainline with 10/11mm spacers.

    On my bike, Chain line at the crank as measured is ~74 mm to the inner face of the outer chainring. On the cassette from the inner face of the 5th cog to center line of the bottom bracket is a ~ 70-71 mm. The Q to the inside of the crank arms is 205 mm . Measuring across the chainstays at the tip of the crank arms I get 159 mm.

    Here is the spec drawing for the SRAM X9 with 100mm BB for fat bikes


    The X9 chain line at 69.5 mm is within 1-2 mm of the center of the cassette, no issue there. The Q-of the X9 crank arms is 179 mm which should give 10 mm of clearance at each side.

    Here is a link to the Surly OD cranks for 100mm BB. The Pugsley would fit but only 7-8 mm clearance to the Chainstays. http://surlybikes.com//uploads/downl...Dimensions.PDF

    Anything I'm missing here?

    BTW: The X5 fatbike crankset has the same specs
    So does this mean the spacers aren't necessary?

  94. #494
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkitekt View Post
    So does this mean the spacers aren't necessary?
    The spacers are necessary with the crankset the Lurch comes with. It won't work at all with out them. I'm guessing the newer cranksets from SRAM and the Surly OD may have less of an angle in the crank arms and an offset in the crank spider so they don't need the spacer to clear the chainstays or get a good chain line on the 190mm rear hub.

  95. #495
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    velonomad, looks like you rode Wrightsville....I am in Wilmington also. Planning a ride next week on Holden Beach. Send me a PM and maybe you have the time to join in with me and my buddy on our Lurch's!

  96. #496
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickngas View Post
    velonomad, looks like you rode Wrightsville....I am in Wilmington also. Planning a ride next week on Holden Beach. Send me a PM and maybe you have the time to join in with me and my buddy on our Lurch's!
    Actually that was Carolina Beach. I'll send you a PM later today. I'm out of town from next Wednesday to Monday. Low tide is at 5pm today I'm heading out right now to Fort Fisher to ride the beach towards Bald Head.

  97. #497
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velonomad View Post
    On my bike, Chain line at the crank as measured is ~74 mm to the inner face of the outer chainring.
    This is the part that is confusing. If you look at the Race Face chainline chart, the inner ring chainline should be in the ~74mm range. Surly cheats this a bit and puts their's at 72mm for the Moonlander (the Moony has a chainline equivalent to a 190mm symmetrical). The Pug chainline is equivalent to a 170mm frame.

    The SRAM cranks are not intended for 190mm framesets, 170mm only. That doesn't mean it won't work with the narrowed chainline, but you'll have limited access to the cassette when in the smaller ring (not an issue IMO). You won't have clearance for anything bigger than the 4" tires you currently have though.

  98. #498
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    So if one were to goto a 1x setup on the lurch, could I use a 170 width crank (like a raceface turbine) and have an ok chainline ? My right knee would thank me.
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  99. #499
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    This is the part that is confusing. If you look at the Race Face chainline chart, the inner ring chainline should be in the ~74mm range. Surly cheats this a bit and puts their's at 72mm for the Moonlander (the Moony has a chainline equivalent to a 190mm symmetrical). The Pug chainline is equivalent to a 170mm frame.

    The SRAM cranks are not intended for 190mm framesets, 170mm only. That doesn't mean it won't work with the narrowed chainline, but you'll have limited access to the cassette when in the smaller ring (not an issue IMO). You won't have clearance for anything bigger than the 4" tires you currently have though.
    Ha! Thanks! I knew I was missing something. You are right about the tire-to-chain clearance. It is 13-14mm now. Installing a crank like a Sram X9 that clearance would fall to about 6 mm. That Sram bottom bracket doesn't use any spacers on 100mm so no where to cheat to gain any clearance, Surly MoonLander is the only one that will fit and maintain tire clearance. The Moonlander will reduce Q by 22 mm over the OEM crank, that is pretty significant. I might go ahead and order one next week.

  100. #500
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    Quote Originally Posted by sven98 View Post
    So if one were to go to a 1x setup on the lurch, could I use a 170 width crank (like a raceface turbine) and have an ok chainline ? My right knee would thank me.
    71-
    I would think so, If the chain line is around 71-72mm( that is what I measure to the center of the cassette) and the inside Q of the crank arms is at least 179mm it should work. If you wanted to go cheap you could get a Sram X5 and throw away the inner chainring.

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