Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 46 of 46
  1. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    285
    Thanks to all posters for your thoughtful and informative replies.

    I just emailed Collin at FatBikes for price for complete build of their 9ZERO7 135mm offset aluminum frame. Frankly, I can hardly wait to get my own FB!

    Warning if you're waiting for the next batch from On-One: 20" is largest frame, much too small for me. Even the XL Salsa was a bit tight, and would require a longer stem and possibly seat change to work.
    jimbo

    www.jamesromeyn.com fine guitars/audio
    www.prime-vibe.com guitar & violin seasoning device

  2. #27
    How much does it weigh?
    Reputation: Borgschulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,156
    Put a rack on an aluminum Fatback... put some weight on the rack... ride it and try pedalling around some corners... it will be very evident. Now stand on the pedals like you mean it... the frame definitely flexes a lot.

    A carbon frame of the same weight would solve this minor situation.

    You can't forget there was at least two people who buckled their down tube.

    I love carbon. And I'm happy for all new products coming to this niche within a niche.

    You don't like, you don't buy. Simple as that.

    If you want something that doesn't exist.. build it! Tons of people did that to bring you the bike you're riding now.

  3. #28
    Fat & Single
    Reputation: ozzybmx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,908
    From the on-one website, the tyre clearance measurement looks to not be much more than 100mm, no room for bud'n'lou. Makes me think that they could be aiming these lighter carbon frames at trail riding as thats where the biggest potential market is really.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Ti O'Beast
    Indy Fab
    One9
    Dirty Disco CX

  4. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    What does carbon bring to the fat bike? Expense, fragility, (ugly as sin aesthetics if the pics I've seen are any indicator) and little else. ...

    How much more weight do you want to save, and at what cost? ...
    Carbon can revolutionise fatbikes if we can use it properly.

    At first the carbon bikes were heading in the right direction, but at the moment carbon bikes are imitating the diamond frames of 1900s roadsters (thanks UCI). I have an old Australian EPX frame which demonstrates how carbon could be used more effectively.



    Think of all the stuff we bolt on to our fatbikes (racks, fenders, frame bags, etc), and then imagine it integrated and part of the structure contributing to the strength, rather than making the bike noodly with a load.

    It would be quite possible to have a frame with a large box section front which could hold luggage instead of strapping on a frame bag, the rear end could have an integrated fender and rack, and even possibly panniers. Even the front fork could have an integrated fender and rack and be much lighter than conventional forks with these parts bolted on. Each of these features would contribute to the stiffness of the bike rather than loading it.

    Other people will have different ideas, but I don't think carbon fibre is being properly exploited as a frame material for fatbikes if it is simply used to make a conventional shape frame (albeit lighter/stiffer).

    (As for the On-One carbon frame, bear in mind they're just experimenting with what they have at hand, and no doubt it will evolve. It's encouraging to see them having a go)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #30
    Mr.Green
    Reputation: Lars Thomsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by ozzybmx View Post
    From the on-one website, the tyre clearance measurement looks to not be much more than 100mm, no room for bud'n'lou. Makes me think that they could be aiming these lighter carbon frames at trail riding as thats where the biggest potential market is really.
    The latest news from Brant, indicates BIG tyre clearance

    Mr.Green

  6. #31
    Fat & Single
    Reputation: ozzybmx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,908
    Thats better now, clearly around 125mm gap in the new picture.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Ti O'Beast
    Indy Fab
    One9
    Dirty Disco CX

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    784
    Regarding the carbon debate I'll just say this, my two carbon bikes (Look 595 and Scott Scale) have seen far more time and abuse than my Pugsley. Only one of them has a cracked frame, care to guess which one?

    Carbon can be amazing stuff. My Scale is the model with the integrated seat mast. After I cut it down I tried to destroy the left over carbon tube by bashing it with a hammer. While the clearcoat was marked up the carbon seems good as new. Tried some hits with a steel mallet as well, still fine.

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,817
    One other thing, carbon fibre is repairable at home without $thousand$ of dollars worth of specialist equipment.

    It's something that the man in a shed with hand tools could use for a fix. That puts it ahead of most other materials in that regard.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,247
    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    One other thing, carbon fibre is repairable at home without $thousand$ of dollars worth of specialist equipment.

    It's something that the man in a shed with hand tools could use for a fix. That puts it ahead of most other materials in that regard.
    Assuming you are keen to repair your $3K frame at home and you have the ability to do so. I'm not going to fix my own bike, but if my out of warranty Pugs has a problem that can be fixed I can take it to a welder and get it sorted for a reasonable cost or if it's something like a thrashed fork I buy another one from Surly for $100.

    I'm open to a CF bike in general, but not for a huge premium over steel/AL.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  10. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,247
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    Carbon can be amazing stuff. My Scale is the model with the integrated seat mast. After I cut it down I tried to destroy the left over carbon tube by bashing it with a hammer. While the clearcoat was marked up the carbon seems good as new. Tried some hits with a steel mallet as well, still fine.
    I've been playing close attention to the damage reports for carbon bikes from brands I'd buy since I figure at one point they'll make a bike I decide to buy [Santa Cruz, Ibis, etc...]. My assessment based on what folks are reporting is the main tubes [TT, DT and ST] are all holding up really well. The damage I've seen has all been in the seat stays, chainstays and in some of the carbon suspension linkages. This is in 5" - 6" FS bikes and the crash damage reports seem to involve falling onto rocks - although some of the falls are of the slow speed tip over variety.

    I don't see the the same type of damage on the AL bikes of the same models. They seem to be more of the high speed crash type damage and the main tubes are failing in that mode as well as the smaller rear triangle tubes.

    Looking at this objectively it seems promising to me that carbon bikes are surviving trail abuse. Obviously the amount and type of material used in the front triangle is working out well. I can only assume folks in the bike industry are tracking the frame failures they are seeing and working on solving them.

    I ride a lot of rough rocky trails and I fall a fair bit. I can live with my frame being damage in some epic crash. I just couldn't stomach the slow speed tip over type crash and look down to see my carbon frame need replacing. My AL frame is marked up and dinged virtually everywhere and hasn't needed any attention.

    I'm not quite ready to buy carbon, but it seems like things are getting to the point where I'd give it a shot. In the all mountain FS bike category carbon is about 33% premium. I hope that comes down a bit. I'm not sure if lowered cost for carbon is something the bike industry is even contemplating.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  11. #36
    Hole Maker.
    Reputation: cendres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by danaco View Post
    Good carbon rims are far more durable than aluminum rims, significantly lighter, significantly stiffer and will come down in cost like everything else does as the technologhy progresses and the numbers grow. I have three sets of carbon wheels and they have proven themselves to be far more durable than my aluminum wheels. The proof is in the use. Don't knock'em unless you've had some time on them.



    I'll leave it at that, flame away.....
    I'm no flamer (!), but I do disagree that they'd be the best choice. I do have many thousands of miles on carbon road and track wheels and am quite well versed in their strengths and weaknesses. That said, I do really like them for those arenas. For fat bikes and mountain bikes, I stand by my opinion.

    How do conventional carbon mtb frames fair against normal rock chips? I'm asking; I don't know.

  12. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,441
    the only bikes I own that don't have nasty oxidation that worries me in a myriad of places around the frame are made of carbon.
    until cities stop laying down salt in winters it's an issue (for me).
    if you drive to the trails or don't want to use your fatbike for around town jaunts in the winter, or ride on the beach if you live on the coast, then it's less of an issue.
    but there are plenty of 600$ chibon frames out there. no bloody reason they can't be wider.
    I don't like carbon for everything... until that saltwater spray off my front wheel starts making permanent white marks on my nice aluminium parts.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Assuming you are keen to repair your $3K frame at home and you have the ability to do so. I'm not going to fix my own bike, but if my out of warranty Pugs has a problem that can be fixed I can take it to a welder and get it sorted for a reasonable cost...
    I agree basically. But let's say your CF frame is out of warranty and has a crack. You can fix it without taking it to a specialist. The result may not look pretty, but would be strong enough if done sensibly.

    No special skills required if you have ever glued anything. (Nothing to stop you taking it to a specialist, of course)
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  14. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MartinS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,441
    Repairing carbon is super easy, and often as cheap or cheaper to do than other frame materials. I have a friend who works at Roberts Composites in Vancouver - :: roberts composites :: - , their repairs start at $150 including paint touch up. There are lots of other companies in the US who do the same.

  15. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,604
    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post
    the only bikes I own that don't have nasty oxidation that worries me in a myriad of places around the frame are made of carbon.
    until cities stop laying down salt in winters it's an issue (for me).
    if you drive to the trails or don't want to use your fatbike for around town jaunts in the winter, or ride on the beach if you live on the coast, then it's less of an issue.
    but there are plenty of 600$ chibon frames out there. no bloody reason they can't be wider.
    I don't like carbon for everything... until that saltwater spray off my front wheel starts making permanent white marks on my nice aluminium parts.
    How 'bout we chip in and get you a nice Ti frame?

  16. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,441

    well, it would be ideal... any of the chiti guys doing 600$ fat frames?
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  17. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,604
    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts View Post

    well, it would be ideal... any of the chiti guys doing 600$ fat frames?
    Keep dreaming. $900 seems to be the ground floor for normal Chinese Ti frames on eBay. Cheapest I've seen a Ti fat frame is $1400 (Carver). Somebody needs to jump on that untapped market. "Byknuts Bicycle Co.", maybe?

  18. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    99
    I know it was already mentioned but 38 Frameworks already has a carbon fat frame available.
    HOGBACK

  19. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Machinist View Post
    I know it was already mentioned but 38 Frameworks already has a carbon fat frame available.
    HOGBACK
    From the weight it doesn't seem to offer any advantage over a good quality alloy frame. Looks nice though.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    756
    As per their site:

    Hogback = 3.5lbs for med carbon frame - $2400.00

    Jackalope = 3.5lbs for med Al. frame - $1200.00

    A good frame saver costs...how much?

  21. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    155
    Not meaning to hijack but is anyone actually on a Jackalope? i've been looking for pretty much exactly that bike (have asked about a future Beargrease and also carvers next generation O'beast but both companies have not returned any inspiring or even positive responses...). i have no love for that choice of colour on the Jackalope but the design overall is meeting my wish list specs!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •