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  1. #101
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    You're asking the wrong question...why do you need 203mm rotors on a rigid fat bike?


    Quote Originally Posted by dirt-nerd View Post
    Will xt brakes with 203 rotors/ adapter from Bluto work with Lauf?
    Thanks

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I checked sag and looked at how it was responding to input, and I would not say that the light springs were too light, though I did bottom it off a jump. If I bought one, I'd go with heavy springs.

    The biggest thing that stands out in my mind is that the Lauf is not a a suspension fork, so if you're expecting suspension, then the Lauf is not for you. It does provide some give, but it's not even as signfincat as riding a Bluto 80mm fork.

    I hear what you're saying about being used to one system, then moving to another, but the reality is that if I want to ride hard, real suspension is the only answer or I will get beat up.
    After spending recent time on all three as well(Bluto, Rigid, and Lauf) I have to agree with you about the Lauf no being the best choice for riding hard.
    I have found the Lauf to be great when riding under 75% effort. Once I tried pushing it in the corners and rough I lost confidence quickly. It is defiantly smoother then full rigid but a lot less predictable. I'm going to take my advice and ride it all winter, but will definitely be going with the Fox plus unless Fox enters the full fat game.

    After riding the Bluto all summer it was a fresh breathe of air going back to rigid. I was really hoping the Lauf would be exactly what I was looking for so I'm really going to give it a chance before selling or throwing it in my wife's Farley!

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You're asking the wrong question...why do you need 203mm rotors on a rigid fat bike?
    Speaking for myself: 265 pounds, plus gear, on long long swoopy downhills = no fade for once
    Yamaguchi Cross • YT Jeffsy • Salsa Mukluk & Vaya • Canyon Commuter

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Speaking for myself: 265 pounds, plus gear, on long long swoopy downhills = no fade for once
    Good calipers are far more important than rotor size, my wife and I are #350 plus kit, tandem fatbike, and 180's are plenty with Guides. Before we got decent calipers we tried lesser calipers and large rotors...not as good.

    ...and it's a big no way on a 203mm rotor for a Lauf.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    ...and it's a big no way on a 203mm rotor for a Lauf.
    Curious as to why you say this. I ask because I'm running BB7s with my Lauf and had to add a couple of washers to the post to clear the caliper body, so I will need to either 1) get hydros to replace the mechs (Guides are the likely choice here) and keep my 180 rotors, or 2) keep the BB7s, get a 20mm post spacer and go to 200s/203s. New rotors are by far the cheaper route, and as I'm not displeased with the performance of the BB7s, I'll likely go this route. They are more fiddly, but fine once they're dialed. Thoughts?

  6. #106
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    ^ That's right. 20 mm spacer and it's ok for Ø 200 or 203 mm disc and BB7.
    Quote Originally Posted by Läskimasa View Post
    I have. Works fine with Ø200 mm disc, maybe not possible with Ø180 mm.
    Fatter is better

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by baltobrewer View Post
    Curious as to why you say this. I ask because I'm running BB7s with my Lauf and had to add a couple of washers to the post to clear the caliper body, so I will need to either 1) get hydros to replace the mechs (Guides are the likely choice here) and keep my 180 rotors, or 2) keep the BB7s, get a 20mm post spacer and go to 200s/203s. New rotors are by far the cheaper route, and as I'm not displeased with the performance of the BB7s, I'll likely go this route. They are more fiddly, but fine once they're dialed. Thoughts?
    Because the mfg says so, which means it voids your warranty if you break the post mounts. That is a huge lever you've creating with those long mounts, on a front brake, mounted to a carbon fork, with an enormous contact patch. Good luck.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Because the mfg says so
    Mfg said to me when I asked about spacer for Ø 200 mm disc, "just standard 160 to 180 mm PM spacer bridge or equivalent amount of spacer shims."
    Fatter is better

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Good calipers are far more important than rotor size, my wife and I are #350 plus kit, tandem fatbike, and 180's are plenty with Guides.
    Your hills aren't as steep as mine I guess
    Yamaguchi Cross • YT Jeffsy • Salsa Mukluk & Vaya • Canyon Commuter

  10. #110
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    Ok, so:

    Nurse Ben says no.

    Laskimasa says yes.

    What sayeth Lauf? Straight from the horse's mouth:

    Lauf' Carbonara Fork?-screen-shot-2016-12-09-2.27.21-pm.jpg

  11. #111
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    you must spread some reputation around before giving it to baltobrewer again.
    thx4ß
    ptarmigan hardcore

  12. #112
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    bearing race?

    What bearing race fits well?
    That included with Cane Creek's ECC44/40 seems too tight;
    the seal seems nice, though..

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    What bearing race fits well?
    That included with Cane Creek's ECC44/40 seems too tight;
    the seal seems nice, though..
    I used the Cane Creek crown race and it was an extremely tight fit! Use lots of grease and hit it hard!

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Your hills aren't as steep as mine I guess
    Wahahaha!

    North Cascades dude, moto trails, not a lot of stuff steeper or more sustained in NA.

    I ran 180mm rotors on a tandem...you dont need unless you're a pro downhiller; do those guys even run 200mm rotors these days?

    The issue with big rotors is warpage anf flex under load. The Lauf twists noticeably under load, a big rotor is more likely to rub.

    The Lauf needs damping, something like a steering damper from a moto, doesnt needto be much.

    The travel is kinda harsh, I much prefer a rigid or a suspension fork.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    I used the Cane Creek crown race and it was an extremely tight fit! Use lots of grease and hit it hard!

    Or stick the fork in your chest freezer for ~3 or 4 hours (or, um, outside in most of North America right now...) then immediately bang the race on.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Or stick the fork in your chest freezer for ~3 or 4 hours (or, um, outside in most of North America right now...) then immediately bang the race on.
    Thanks Mike! I will have to remember that for the future!

  17. #117
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    re: crown bearing race

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Or stick the fork in your chest freezer for ~3 or 4 hours
    Doh! no chest freezer since Matthew..
    Further research reveals Cane Creek offering 3 different crown races:
    10 series - polymer
    40 series - steel with seal
    110 series - alloy with (double?) seal

    Polymer or alloy likely would be better for carbon fiber crown.

  18. #118
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    +1
    tight fit cane creak race on Carbonara fork, put it on my Beargrease a few rides ago. I found even working on the Thomson stem on to steerer tube to be more snug than normal but no issues...

  19. #119
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    re: crown race

    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    no chest freezer since Matthew
    OK, crown race setter upgraded from plastic to aluminum
    (1.75" OD 0.065" wall tube fits well, avoiding seal contact)
    seated crown race, but not fully.
    Aligning with sun illuminated a small gap on one side.
    Race does not appear to be crooked;
    is Carbonara crown imperfectly square to steerer tube?

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    OK, crown race setter upgraded from plastic to aluminum
    (1.75" OD 0.065" wall tube fits well, avoiding seal contact)
    seated crown race, but not fully.
    Aligning with sun illuminated a small gap on one side.
    Race does not appear to be crooked;
    is Carbonara crown imperfectly square to steerer tube?
    I've always just used PVC pipe to set the race. In these temps, I could just put the fork outside and it'd end up a lot colder than most freezers
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I've always just used PVC pipe to set the race.
    With PVC, mine seemed to stop about 2mm from seated,
    and damaging Cane Creek's integrated seal was a concern.

    In these temps, I could just put the fork outside and it'd end up a lot colder than most freezers
    It was warm enough here today for shorts and tee.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by baltobrewer View Post
    Ok, so:

    Nurse Ben says no.

    Laskimasa says yes.

    What sayeth Lauf? Straight from the horse's mouth:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2016-12-09 at 2.27.21 PM.jpg 
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    Ditch the bb7 for a trp spyke. Its narrower than shimano hydro, dual piston movement.
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  23. #123
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    I've got 2 Lauf forks, a TR29 on my gravel whip and the Carbonara on a Framed Alaska Carbon. My opinion only, it beats the heck out of rigid for small bump compliance (especially on the gravel bike) and takes the sting out of hard to coordinate drops on the fattie.
    Compared to my Spec Fuse plus-bike with Manitou Magnum- the Lauf will never be truly plush in the big hits. It is plush for the smaller stuff, super compliant. It doesn't pump like an old 4" fork without lockout. First, it doesn't have that range. Second, the resistance is progressive. It won't be a Bluto, it shouldn't have to be.
    It is worth noting that it doesn't seem to care about temperature as compared to elastomers and hydraulics. The maintenance kit is a soft cloth.
    It's simple, and it does it's thing. For serious questions, as about, contact Lauf directly. They're more than happy to reply.

  24. #124
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    First little test ride on the Carbonara today. We've been in and out of freeze/thaw cycles all week, so things are a lumpy, crusty mess right now - perfect testing grounds.

    The amount of squish is more noticeable than I thought it would be, but in a good way, and smoother than I was expecting. For this type of chunky, uneven surface riding, it didn't feel bouncy at all, just felt like it was doing what it was supposed to.

    The Blackborow isn't my year-round primary trail bike - it's my winter ride and occasional bikepacking rig, and for these uses, I think the Lauf is going to be exactly what I was looking for.

    Do it however you want to do it. You don't owe anyone an explanation.

  25. #125
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    I'm looking at the Carbonara. I only weigh ~150 lbs so i'd be getting the light spring version.

    It appears as though axle wrap could be a concern in hard braking. Does it dive when braking?

    Also some here say it is NOT torsionally rigid and others say it is precise. If not as precise as a rigid fork, is it MORE precise than a bluto?
    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact with the trail.

  26. #126
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    I've got a Regular Spring Carbonara now but had a Bluto. I find the Carbonara to be more predictable than the Bluto under compression while cornering. For me, the Bluto would encounter stiction because of torsional flexing and then suddenly compress. That was a little unnerving and made me more cautious because I didn't always know what the fork would do. The Lauf is very consistent in tracking(however not quite as precise as a rigid fork) through the corner yet is not quite as plush as the Bluto. I would gladly trade that for consistency.

    PS...I weigh around 170 lbs. and am on the border between Light and Regular Springs according to Lauf. I am most likely not flexing the fork as much as someone that weighs more than I do so that probably plays a role in people's opinion of the fork.

  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    I'm looking at the Carbonara. I only weigh ~150 lbs so i'd be getting the light spring version.

    It appears as though axle wrap could be a concern in hard braking. Does it dive when braking?

    Also some here say it is NOT torsionally rigid and others say it is precise. If not as precise as a rigid fork, is it MORE precise than a bluto?
    I would not think that, even given an exceptionally heavy person, that axle wrap would be a concern. IMO, the springs are far too stiff to do so, and given that there are two sets of springs tied together by the axle stanchion, I would think this almost physically impossible. Typically axle wrap on 4X4 vehicles occurs when there is only one set of springs and the axle literally twists itself up.

    I have not experienced lateral flex, but have heard reports of it occurring during very heavy braking combined with hard cornering forces. Personally, if you're riding this hard, then the Lauf probably isn't the fork for you anyway. Go with a Mastodon and call it a day.

  28. #128
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    lateral flex

    Quote Originally Posted by baltobrewer View Post
    I have not experienced lateral flex, but have heard reports of it occurring during very heavy braking combined with hard cornering forces.
    My route to the beach requires moderate braking on a narrow paved downhill curved path, and that braking provokes bothersome directional change appreciably more than occurred with a rigid fork. No experience with Bluto or other telescoping fork and disk brake.

  29. #129
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    Thanks all!

    Very interesting! Hmm
    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact with the trail.

  30. #130
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    bumping this, i'm thinking of picking up a Lauf for my newly acquired Farley 9.6.

    Any other reviews?

    I'm looking to get the regular version and I weigh 215 and ride mostly smooth XC/trail. I'm 43 if that matters.

    I will run my Farley 29 x 3 in summer and 27.5 x 4.5 winter.

    I've had 2 Bluto's and didn't love either of them, I don't really want to add the weight of the Wren or Mastodon for my typical riding.....and not sure the Mastodon will clear the downtube.

    Thanks
    Last edited by Swerny; 08-22-2017 at 08:08 AM.
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  31. #131
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    I have one on my Framed Alaska Carbon. I rode a Bluto before on my Specialized Fatboy Pro. I weigh 210 lbs. and would consider my rides average, with no large obstacles, hard corners, or jumping. I find the weight savings and simplicity to outweigh the additional plushness of the Bluto. I haven't experienced any of the negative handling characteristics mentioned in this thread.

  32. #132
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    Have had mine since November and have been riding in mainly rooty, rocky, chunky stuff. Certainly less plush than my old Lefty, and probably less so than a Bluto or Mastodon, but then again, I don't tend to ride as aggressively as I once did (47 yo here). Bottom line, for me, is that there seems to be an inverse relationship between the aggressiveness of your riding and the appropriateness of a Lauf.

  33. #133
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    Lauf' Carbonara Fork?

    Swerny
    I had a Lauf for the last 6 months & I weigh a little more than u and it didn't last through the rooty, rocky XC single track I was doing (4x a week) They do stand behind their fork and warrantied it asap. It definitely splits the difference between a bluto & rigid fork but not for real trail riding. Snow & smooth trails it would be great.


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  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt-nerd View Post
    Swerny
    I had a Lauf for the last 6 months & I weigh a little more than u and it didn't last through the rooty, rocky XC single track I was doing (4x a week) They do stand behind their fork and warrantied it asap. It definitely splits the difference between a bluto & rigid fork but not for real trail riding. Snow & smooth trails it would be great.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

    Wow, mines been pretty bomb proof on rocky Colorado singletrack. What was the failure mode?
    MiTT
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  35. #135
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    It wasn't a failure yet but the small parts of carbon on leaf springs started to come peal. Then the fork was hitting the stoppers on smaller bumps that they never hit before. I ride a lot of the same trails so it was easy to notice. It did not feel good. I sent a picture to rep and asked what they thought .... After a few emails they sent me new forks & I sent mine back.


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