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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    Also I wanted some special things, I did not want rack mounts, I wanted the smaller 170mm rear end, I want a more narrow Q factor more similar to a regular mtn bike, etc... and this is all very different from the Borealis bike which is more of a powder adventure back country sand bike. I'm going for a super light year round racing fat bike, not an adventure back country 5" tire snow bike which I do think is cool, and which I might add to our product line when the Asians start selling that directly.
    Sounds like my kind of bike. Not in the market this year but I will definitely keep an eye out for y'all in the future.

  2. #52
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    One things for sure, if I was in the market for a carbon fatty, I'd get it from LaMere over specialized for darn sure.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    Yes! True, keep the lifejackets coming.....here's our warranty policy:
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    Define "lifetime" please.

  4. #54
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    Oh dear, things are getting unpleasant.

    Maybe the lesson here is to bring manufacturing back home (wherever that may be).
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  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post

    Maybe the lesson here is to bring manufacturing back home (wherever that may be).

    Amen!!

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    ...we buy parts directly from the USA's biggest distributors...
    What distributors do you go through?
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  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Oh dear, things are getting unpleasant.

    Maybe the lesson here is to bring manufacturing back home (wherever that may be).
    Then be prepared to pay 2-10 times more for the same product. The labor cost alone is a huge factor in an item like a frame. That is the primary reason that nearly all of the CF frame product exists where it does right now.

    Right or wrong, the cheap labor overseas has a direct impact on the price you have to pay for these things.

    Despite the feel good nature of the thought, the reality would probably be beyond may peoples means or at least what would be considered a rational expense.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Despite the feel good nature of the thought, the reality would probably be beyond may peoples means or at least what would be considered a rational expense.
    Depends on what sort of stock one puts in things like warranty and customer service, which seems rational as opposed to just "feeling good". If the direct-from-China route even includes a warranty, good luck with a replacement? Tell me if I've missed something. Interesting thread.
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Then be prepared to pay 2-10 times more for the same product.
    There is a nontrivial possibility this notion will affect us in the not too distant future, in general, with respect to consumer goods. Love or hate China, we are deeply codependent.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikefat View Post
    Depends on what sort of stock one puts in things like warranty and customer service, which seems rational as opposed to just "feeling good". If the direct-from-China route even includes a warranty, good luck with a replacement? Tell me if I've missed something. Interesting thread.
    I was responding to the "bring it home" suggestion.

    I presumed that this statement would include big brands offerings like Spesh, Trek, etc. not just the ebay direct offerings.

    The warranty and service issue is a different issue entirely.

  11. #61
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    I think if this was a normal 29er hard tail this thread would be going in a different direction. But the fatbike scene seems to bread a different type of rider. Most fat bike riders that I know would rather buy there bike from a LBS or manufacturer that they know are also supporting our local fat bike scene. It's a newly evolving group of riders. Most winter user groups have yet to encounter fat bikes on snowmobile trails, and XC ski trails. We need a commitment from local companies who are willing to help out. Lets see these companies put money back into the scene (a lot do) and those are the ones who will initially set the foundation for future fat bikes

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    There is a nontrivial possibility this notion will affect us in the not too distant future, in general, with respect to consumer goods. Love or hate China, we are deeply codependent.
    Yes. And too often people respond emotionally without realizing the full implication of their suggestions.

    If someone is so against this kind of labor, what other choices do they make in their life to avoid being "part of the problem". Clothing, electronics, and so many of the products we all take for granted are made in places with living conditions and wages far below what many people realize or would be happy to experience themselves.

    In order to correct those situations, it would lead to an inevitable increase in costs for many of the things we use in our daily lives. That has implications far beyond most of these discussions.

    My point is that if you want to claim to have these considerations at heart, you should be considering how far they really reach.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    I was responding to the "bring it home" suggestion.

    I presumed that this statement would include big brands offerings like Spesh, Trek, etc. not just the ebay direct offerings.

    The warranty and service issue is a different issue entirely.
    Gotcha now, sorry... a bit too much bourbon warming back up after today's ride...
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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikefat View Post
    Depends on what sort of stock one puts in things like warranty and customer service, which seems rational as opposed to just "feeling good". If the direct-from-China route even includes a warranty, good luck with a replacement? Tell me if I've missed something. Interesting thread.
    Yeah, I dunno about that- "local" companies (*cough* specialized *cough*) aren't exactly known for standing behind their warranties...

    And my hand built, locally crafted custom frame came with a lifetime warranty (hey, if you ever crash and break the frame, bring it back to me and I'll work with you to fix it), except that the builder went under and no longer exists.

    Most warranties have so many astrixes as to be no better than fishwrap.

  15. #65
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    Lamere cycles carbon fatbike

    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Yeah, I dunno about that- "local" companies (*cough* specialized *cough*) aren't exactly known for standing behind their warranties...

    And my hand built, locally crafted custom frame came with a lifetime warranty (hey, if you ever crash and break the frame, bring it back to me and I'll work with you to fix it), except that the builder went under and no longer exists.

    Most warranties have so many astrixes as to be no better than fishwrap.
    At best, a "lifetime" warranty is for the lifetime of the company. No way around that.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Most warranties have so many astrixes as to be no better than fishwrap.
    True, that. What I find surprising are the number of riders my weight (down to 242lbs these days, thanks to my pup, despite all the Wild Turkey 101) who won't even consider a CF frame 'cuz they're certain they'll break it. I've been away from the MTB scene for a long time, new to fatbikes, is it really as bad as all that? I wonder. Just curious, really only into CF for rims, potentially, mebbe a fork -- but digging the CF-frame manufacturing discussion.
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  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    At best, a "lifetime" warranty is for the lifetime of the company. No way around that.
    Yup. Thinking more along the lines of, with any company, you're rolling the dice on whether there will be any way to warranty at all after a couple years.

  18. #68
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    I strongly disagree!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Then be prepared to pay 2-10 times more for the same product.
    Manufacturing in Asia completely revolves around profit margin. Without question manufacturing costs are dramatically lower there than here in the US. There are other tradeoff's like time zone, communication, quality, delivery, and protection from piracy to name a few but still many companies find it dramatically cost effective to go "offshore" for manufacturing needs. Most importantly though those cost savings are not passed on to the consumer. On the contrary, the goods manufactured are more often than not sold at prices close to what they would cost if made in the US, at least as it relates to bicycle manufacturing in particular. This was exactly the case when Dorel moved Cannondale frame manufacturing to Asia yet the bike prices did not go down, instead profitability went up! The American manufacturing employees got screwed over and lost their jobs, the consumer saw no price concessions on bikes, and Dorel became more profitable. Compare the price of a comparable Fatback aluminum frame bike to a Salsa, or 9 zero 7 and see what the price difference is, around 10 percent maybe. Even though the cost to manufacture the offshore frames is one tenth the cost of the US made Fatback.

  19. #69
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by richulr View Post
    looks like the Borealis
    The lamere has a better derailleur hanger.

    Also the Borealis has 190mm spacing, this is 170mm.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtuck1 View Post
    Manufacturing in Asia completely revolves around profit margin. Without question manufacturing costs are dramatically lower there than here in the US. There are other tradeoff's like time zone, communication, quality, delivery, and protection from piracy to name a few but still many companies find it dramatically cost effective to go "offshore" for manufacturing needs. Most importantly though those cost savings are not passed on to the consumer. On the contrary, the goods manufactured are more often than not sold at prices close to what they would cost if made in the US, at least as it relates to bicycle manufacturing in particular. This was exactly the case when Dorel moved Cannondale frame manufacturing to Asia yet the bike prices did not go down, instead profitability went up! The American manufacturing employees got screwed over and lost their jobs, the consumer saw no price concessions on bikes, and Dorel became more profitable. Compare the price of a comparable Fatback aluminum frame bike to a Salsa, or 9 zero 7 and see what the price difference is, around 10 percent maybe. Even though the cost to manufacture the offshore frames is one tenth the cost of the US made Fatback.
    Very good points!!

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtuck1 View Post
    Manufacturing in Asia completely revolves around profit margin. Without question manufacturing costs are dramatically lower there than here in the US. There are other tradeoff's like time zone, communication, quality, delivery, and protection from piracy to name a few but still many companies find it dramatically cost effective to go "offshore" for manufacturing needs. Most importantly though those cost savings are not passed on to the consumer. On the contrary, the goods manufactured are more often than not sold at prices close to what they would cost if made in the US, at least as it relates to bicycle manufacturing in particular. This was exactly the case when Dorel moved Cannondale frame manufacturing to Asia yet the bike prices did not go down, instead profitability went up! The American manufacturing employees got screwed over and lost their jobs, the consumer saw no price concessions on bikes, and Dorel became more profitable. Compare the price of a comparable Fatback aluminum frame bike to a Salsa, or 9 zero 7 and see what the price difference is, around 10 percent maybe. Even though the cost to manufacture the offshore frames is one tenth the cost of the US made Fatback.
    Yeahbut, the cost of a Salsa mukluk frame and fork is $699, while a frame alone from fatback is $1000 + at least $200 for a fork. THat's a whole lot more than 10%.

    Not saying you are wrong about costs not doubling, but the effect isn't insignificant.

    I'm all for a countrywide re-cajiggering of our collective values, to the point that we all looked at the cost of things not only in terms of what we save, but in terms of what the money from that sale does. But I don't see that happening any time soon. We should all try harder, though.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    re-cajiggering
    Careful!!
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  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Yeahbut, the cost of a Salsa mukluk frame and fork is $699, while a frame alone from fatback is $1000 + at least $200 for a fork. THat's a whole lot more than 10%.
    The Fatback alloy frame (apples to apples) is $850.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Yes. And too often people respond emotionally without realizing the full implication of their suggestions.

    If someone is so against this kind of labor, what other choices do they make in their life to avoid being "part of the problem". Clothing, electronics, and so many of the products we all take for granted are made in places with living conditions and wages far below what many people realize or would be happy to experience themselves.

    In order to correct those situations, it would lead to an inevitable increase in costs for many of the things we use in our daily lives. That has implications far beyond most of these discussions.

    My point is that if you want to claim to have these considerations at heart, you should be considering how far they really reach.
    Very true. For the past few years, I have made an effort to only buy US made when I am buying new everyday clothing. It is not only quite difficult, but also quite expensive. Bike clothing is even more difficult to find.

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    So many Americans that have never been over to China really don't have a full understanding of how things work there.....and there are 2 huge misconceptions:

    1- Americans think there is slave and child labor making everything in China. Fortunately this is totally wrong, although there is some prison labor and some really deplorable working conditions. People move from the countryside to work in factories to make more money and better their lives. Sure, from our first world view it looks horrible working in a factory and living at the factory with 6 other people in your room, but their hope is to work, save money, move up to a management position, work their way up. Life is not perfect.

    2- Everything from China is just a ripoff of an American or European good. Well yes they have copied a lot of 1st world technology, but what do you expect when we have them make it all for us? Can we really expect them to make our stuff and not want to make it for themselves and do better in life moving up the value chain? The bike industry is a little different, they have become masters of carbon fiber bicycle mfg over the last 20 years, they totally own that market, its theirs, get used to it, and I say good for them. Chinese need jobs too, the world needs jobs, its a world economy. Does America really want a bunch of low skill, low paying factory jobs? I say we're better off focusing on the service economy and really utilizing our highly educated workforce for higher value chain jobs. People talk about the Chinese owning us now and holding all our debt...true but if we don't pay they are screwed, so its more a factor of them trusting us.

    Mexico just 'surpassed' China in lower wages....the smart move would be to set up a carbon fiber bike factory in Mexico, then I wouldn't have to wait so long to get frames all the way from China.
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  26. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    So many Americans that have never been over to China really don't have a full understanding of how things work there.....and there are 2 huge misconceptions:

    1- Americans think there is slave and child labor making everything in China. Fortunately this is totally wrong, although there is some prison labor and some really deplorable working conditions. People move from the countryside to work in factories to make more money and better their lives. Sure, from our first world view it looks horrible working in a factory and living at the factory with 6 other people in your room, but their hope is to work, save money, move up to a management position, work their way up. Life is not perfect.

    2- Everything from China is just a ripoff of an American or European good. Well yes they have copied a lot of 1st world technology, but what do you expect when we have them make it all for us? Can we really expect them to make our stuff and not want to make it for themselves and do better in life moving up the value chain? The bike industry is a little different, they have become masters of carbon fiber bicycle mfg over the last 20 years, they totally own that market, its theirs, get used to it, and I say good for them. Chinese need jobs too, the world needs jobs, its a world economy. Does America really want a bunch of low skill, low paying factory jobs? I say we're better off focusing on the service economy and really utilizing our highly educated workforce for higher value chain jobs. People talk about the Chinese owning us now and holding all our debt...true but if we don't pay they are screwed, so its more a factor of them trusting us.

    Mexico just 'surpassed' China in lower wages....the smart move would be to set up a carbon fiber bike factory in Mexico, then I wouldn't have to wait so long to get frames all the way from China.
    sorry for being a bit off topic but; I just watched "Death by China" and of course took it w a large dose of salt since it was painfully biased towards paranoia but even if it was 15% off the scale, then the reality is still frightening (and btw i'm Canadian but we all sit on the same piece of dirt...). A lot of the chatter about this and the other threads on this forum are relavent to the 'buy local vs super low price'. After watching the documentary i must admit i'm looking much more carefully at labels (perhaps its just a newfound phase that i'm going through though...)

  27. #77
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    Sorry if I missed it during this thread, but will this frame run with 29er+ wheelset.

    Has a price for the frame been stated yet. What would delivery to UK cost.

    Brian

  28. #78
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    Still have not seen what they mean by "lifetime"

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    Hey Pete Bassinger, you really want to get into this here? Ok let's do it... so for all the readers here's what happened, I posted that picture on our FB page because that's what our frame factory sent us and said we can now make you a fat frame. They knew I wanted one because I was pestering them for a fat frame for over 2 years. So they sent me a photo of a fat frame to prove they can make one, and I was psyched. Then the stressed out Borealis d-bags called me yelling and screaming threatening to sue me, so I told the Borealis d-bags to calm down, that I would take down the picture no problem, which I did, right away. How was I to know that was your frame? How do we know now that is your frame? Hopefully it is your frame they are pumping out for someone else. Do you think I bought one of your frames and flew over to Asia with it and had it reverse engineered? You guys seem really stressed out, pretty different than me as I got into the bike biz because I love biking and I was tired of bike industry prices which are out of control. But you want everyone to have to pay $2200 for your fat bike frame so you guys can get rich. Above you called me a bottom feeder...how am I a bottom feeder? Did you guys invent the fat bike or something? My main goal in starting LaMere Cycles has been to get more people on great bikes for way less money than what is now being charged in the bike industry, the money will come down the road perhaps.

    Maybe if you spoke Mandarin and have lived and worked in China and Taiwan like me you would understand the Asian business model better and how things work over there. If you think your fat frame is not gonna be copied then I don't know what to tell you.

    We did not "start over" because you threatened to sue us. Our factory offered to make us a fat frame for a not inconsequential mould fee, and we did it. We were signed up to be a dealer of yours but then you reneged on that after finding a bigger shop in Minneapolis, but you didn't have the courtesy to call and tell us that, you just stopped returning our calls and emails. Classy.

    As long as the gloves are off, I don't believe your fat frame weighs what you say it does on your website: "Lightweight: 1270 gram frame (We only post actual weights- This is a size Medium frame that is fully painted, finished, and includes derailleur hangar.)" How about you post an actual picture of the bike on a scale like I do with my frames and components on my site?

    As far as how long I've been riding a fat bike, well about a year after Surly produced the first ones here in MN. I was riding a bike before you were born d-bag.

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  30. #80
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    Hmm, so many points on here to comment on, but I'll just leave it at this.

    Nothing I posted was false Logantri.

    My opinion is that he was shady based off of the original situation with the picture.

    Misunderstanding? Sure. Possible. Always different ways to look at things. Do I still think he is shady? Actually no.

    Jp-I don't work for Borealis, but I'll take the douche bag comments as directed towards me. Not the first time I've been called a douche bag.

    I don't know the situation on the reneging on the dealer thing or what the conversation was when they asked you to remove the picture, but I have my doubts on your representation.

    Good luck with your bike.

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    Having known JP for a number of years, I'll go on record and say he's definitely a stand-up guy that sells a great product. He's got a ton of passion and loves to ride, and only wants for more people to be able to ride the best product possible (unless you see alloy or steel as superior, of course). Trying to make that an affordable thing is a challenge, but he's providing a viable solution for more of us to get on a bike and pedal (a carbon-framed bike), and that's just awesome. I'll look forward to LaMere's success and hope to see more and more their bikes out on the trail.

    Cheers!

    Jesse Hansen
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bravo Foxtrot View Post
    Having known JP for a number of years, I'll go on record and say he's definitely a stand-up guy that sells a great product. He's got a ton of passion and loves to ride, and only wants for more people to be able to ride the best product possible. Trying to make that an affordable thing is a challenge, but he's providing a viable solution for more of us to get on a bike and pedal (a carbon-framed bike), and that's just awesome. I'll look forward to LaMere's success and hope to see more and more their bikes out on the trail.

    Cheers!

    Jesse Hansen
    Morrison, CO
    So you're saying that steel and alloy bikes are neither ridable nor affordable?

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    Quote Originally Posted by maddslacker View Post
    So you're saying that steel and alloy bikes are neither ridable nor affordable?

    lol, no, just a thing of the past for most of the "new buyer" market. Sorry I forgot that the fatbike crowd likes steel as well. I'll have to edit my comment. I mean to say that a lot of carbon frames options aren't affordable or attractive (for fatbike newbs, like me).

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    Heh, I'm (mostly) messing around. I actually am pretty stoked to try some foreign carbon without having to sell a kidney.

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    Well isn't this thread interesting as hell? Wow, perfect way to start my day!

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    Pete this is at least the 3rd time I've seen you get into it with a fellow poster on different forum's regarding fat bikes and the Yampa, that you seem to defend a lot. I think it's safe to say you have a rooting interest with Borealis. You state you don't work for them, but the cynic in me says that isn't the whole truth.

  37. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    Sorry if I missed it during this thread, but will this frame run with 29er+ wheelset.
    I'd be interested in this as well. If not for this carbon bike, but for future variants.
    GIS/GPS Pro using ArcFM for Utility Mapping - Always willing to connect with other MTBers in the industry.

  38. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    Pete this is at least the 3rd time I've seen you get into it with a fellow poster on different forum's regarding fat bikes and the Yampa, that you seem to defend a lot. I think it's safe to say you have a rooting interest with Borealis. You state you don't work for them, but the cynic in me says that isn't the whole truth.
    hmmmmm

    http://www.borealisbikes.com/about-us

    I'd say that the cynic in you was correct...


    MC

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    I just assumed that was Pete Basinger from Borealis since his screen name is pbasinger since 2004 and he is the biggest Borealis devotee ever. I was surprised after I defended myself with my long defensive rant and then he replied saying he does not work for Borealis...not sure how else he would have got our Facebook photo and correspondence. Not sure why he's being so defensive either, Borealis makes a cool bike, awesome for back country deep snow adventure camping and endurance events....mine is a fat racing bike, different deal, there can be more than one fatbike on the market right? Borealis also needs to quit lying about the weight of their frames. The LaMere 17" size weighs exactly 1283g, quit saying your Borealis weighs 1270, and quit lying about saying on your site you only post actual weights please, that is my main pet peeve about the bike industry is 70% of companies lying about their weights. The Borealis frame weighs at least 1330g, and who even cares we're talking about 47g big f'ing deal.
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    JP, you got an availability date and price tag for those new 65mm carbon rims?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    I just assumed that was Pete Basinger from Borealis since his screen name is pbasinger since 2004 and he is the biggest Borealis devotee ever. I was surprised after I defended myself with my long defensive rant and then he replied saying he does not work for Borealis...not sure how else he would have got our Facebook photo and correspondence. Not sure why he's being so defensive either, Borealis makes a cool bike, awesome for back country deep snow adventure camping and endurance events....mine is a fat racing bike, different deal, there can be more than one fatbike on the market right? Borealis also needs to quit lying about the weight of their frames. The LaMere 17" size weighs exactly 1283g, quit saying your Borealis weighs 1270, and quit lying about saying on your site you only post actual weights please, that is my main pet peeve about the bike industry is 70% of companies lying about their weights. The Borealis frame weighs at least 1330g, and who even cares we're talking about 47g big f'ing deal.

    Yeah, busted! If I was Borealis I'd be more worried about the factory my frames are made in at this point. If they are showing you raw out-of-the-mold frames and sending pics, who else are they doing this for? And are they selling frames to other people or companies for 1/4 of the price.

    100-200 grams of frame weight doesn't matter when your tires weight 1200-1400 grams each, IMHO.

  42. #92
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    They will start to trickle in mid Jan, hope to have all my order by end of Jan.
    JP LaMere
    Phone USA: (612) 326-4183
    Web: LaMereCycles.com or Facebook.com/LaMereCycles
    Email: lamerecycles@gmail.com

  43. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplamere1 View Post
    They will start to trickle in mid Jan, hope to have all my order by end of Jan.
    Well, once things get settled, let us know when you'll have rims available and cost per rim.

  44. #94
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    Wow interesting threat. My wife even read it. I have no idea how I missed it the past couple of weeks. Cool looking bikes.

    Click goes the bar.
    Still cleaning my Fatback.
    It's a life style.

  45. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSJ1973 View Post
    Yeah, busted!

    Man, you guys are good. I thought I was being sneaky with the whole pbasinger thing. Who thought my first initial and last name would give me away. Thatís some serious NSA stuff there.

    I'm sure there's some expert on here that can contradict me, but I don't work for Borealis. I grew up down the street from Adam the owner and I want his business to be successful. I had lots of input on the original design over a year ago, I call him from time to time to offer unsolicited advice on different things and usually let Adam crash at my place in Moab. That's about it.

    Like I said before, Iíve revised my opinion of JP based off of the picture posted earlier. I believe the factory sent him that picture as an example of something they made for another client or could make for him or whatever.

    All the other stuff contained in JPs err.. post here - I don't know. I don't work for them. I doubt there was any reneging, I bet they just decided to sell to a different, bigger shop, but I'm just guessing. Frame weight, I have no idea, what Borealis states for weights, but given they appear to come from the same factory I imagine they are about the same.

    [/QUOTE]If I was Borealis I'd be more worried about the factory my frames are made in at this point.[/QUOTE]

    I completely agree.
    Main difference is Borealis is trying to make a brand that sells to bike shops not direct. Different business model and different pricing structure.

    Carry on you all you super sleuths.

  46. #96
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    I just ordered a set of 65mm Lamere, going to lace them to some i9's...
    Design, price, warranty were my considerations (not slick marketing)
    Perfect number of bikes (n) + 1

  47. #97
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    That is a sick set of hoops my man. Very jealous.

  48. #98
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    Here is a local newspaper article with photos of the LaMere and Mr. LaMere.

    Fat bikes -- with 4-inch-wide tires -- on the rise in metro parks | Star Tribune


    <img src="http://stmedia.startribune.com/images/ows_139171230612963.jpg" width="1000">
    <img src="http://stmedia.startribune.com/images/ows_139171229449619.jpg" width="1000">
    <img src="http://stmedia.startribune.com/images/ows_139171231891149.jpg" width="1000">
    <img src="http://stmedia.startribune.com/images/ows_139171230055923.jpg" width="1000">
    ...Be careful what you're looking at because it might be looking back...

  49. #99
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    I purchased a complete build from JP this week - his customer service is the BEST I have ever had in dealing with a bike related company.

    He sent me photos throughout the build process, and kept me in the loop with multiple emails letting me know the status / progress of the build / asking me my input on items.

    He shipped the bike exactly when he said he would and the bike should be here Monday.

    I visited his shop while I was in Minneapolis on business and rode the bike - it feels like my Niner race bike - but way cushier / grippy in snow. It was super fast and responsive unlike any fatty I have rode before (have not ridden a full carbon fatty in the past however)

    Thanks JP!

  50. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    Here is a local newspaper article with photos of the LaMere and Mr. LaMere.

    Fat bikes -- with 4-inch-wide tires -- on the rise in metro parks | Star Tribune





    Wow great looking Lamere bike. Sorry to hijack the thread though but that black sheep fat bike in the last photo really caught my eye. Frame lines I have not seen them do before ....a real beauty!

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