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  1. #1
    Mr. Knowitall
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    How light can a Pugsley get without breaking the bank?

    Ok, so I have a Necromancer Pug. Stock(-ish). It's heavier than my 160mm enduro racing bike. It is now stock with the following mods:
    Easton Havoc Carbon bar
    Race Face Turbine stem
    Grip shift X0 Nine speed
    X7 f+r derailleurs
    Lightweight tubes
    Clown Shoe front rim
    Bud 127tpi front tire
    Gravity dropper turbo
    SDG Formula TTR saddle
    Avid Elixir 5 with 180mm discs

    Ok not that much stock left... Is this bike just heavy? I really like tje Steel simplicity, but the weight is just too much. Is there anything to gain on spokes and hubs (I build my own wheels). Howabout the MWOD cranks? I may get a good deal on X01, that could be run with 3. Party chainring/cranks. 1x10 will be too much for climbing.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    nvphatty
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    It's a tough go to make 30lbs but doable at the expense of your wallet no doubt. You'll need 1x9 or 10, lightweight toobs or toobless setup with UL tires of some brand, a lightweight crankset and maybe it'll hit 29lbs.

  3. #3
    Mr. Knowitall
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    I think the best shot is to change the frame and fork for aluminium - or go for a full build. It seems the frame is the biggest culprit here..

  4. #4
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    My Pug frame is about 700 grams heavier than my 907 frame. The 907 is about as light as you can get an alloy frame (+/- a few grams).

    So basically you can get a Pug to within 700 grams of the lightest fatbike (until we start getting 800 gm carbon ones).

    The big weight savings are all in the wheels, drilling, tubeless etc, which are basically your labour, so free. Do all that and you'll be close to a light budget fatbike. Start trying to save weight on the other components and the bills will start rising quickly.

    Edit:

    I forgot one cheap weight saver - brakes. If you know how to set them up properly, use canti brakes. Negatives are rim wear if you ride in wet gritty conditions.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  5. #5
    Mr. Knowitall
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    Hmm. So I will basicly have to HTFU and man up. I would hope wheels with lighter hubs and spokes may be an option and an alloy fork - but it seems forks are coming in tapered versions more and more. And I really do not like my sliding horizontal dropouts particularly, as they refuse to play ball with my disk brakes with a 180mm rotor. And i really would like to run a trailer with my bike at some point.

    I guess I can loose 1 kg + if I go alloy instead of steel on frame and fork. A Norwegian sports chain is making alloy prototype forks and frames at decent weights, but I do not agree on their geometry philosophy.

    The usage for this bike is to be my winter trailbike and spare summer bike. I will ride it on the hardpack singletrack around my house with climbs and decents all over the place. I will ride as aggressively as I can on a fully rigid bike to keep my skills and training maintained through the winter. And at some point use the bike to pull a trailer with my son onboard for those days that is necessary.

  6. #6
    Human Test Subject
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    Carver fork will save over a pound and it is comfortable. I dunno what kind of budget you have. I spent around 1k on Moonlander upgrades and it weighs in at just under 31.

    EDIT- thinking back on it now, I spent way more than 1k.

  7. #7
    All fat, all the time.
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    You'll be giving up performance possibly, but the clownshoe bud combo is not helping your weight. Also the dropper seatpost.

  8. #8
    Fat & Single
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    Careful selection of tubes or better still tubeless can save a lot of weight for minimal $$$ (can actually save you dollars over Surly toobs).

    Add a Carver fork for a bit of cash and drop a load + transform the front of the bike in weight and handling.

    Cranks and possibly going 1x10/9 are another good dropper.

    All the rest of the carbon bling can be added after.
    Evil Following
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  9. #9
    Mr. Knowitall
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    Clown Shoe/Bud is giving me more days on the trails when it is snowing, so they stay, and dropper post came on after first two rides (never riding without one in technical terrain).

    The Carver fork is lightweight and nice, but I heard it does flex a lot when pushed... A friend got one for his wife but not for himself.

    Anyone know the weight of the MWOD cranks including BB? Cannot find any info on the webb (and I am too lazy to check myself).

  10. #10
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    How light can a Pugsley get without breaking the bank?

    I think the best bet is going Ti. Lifelong lite weight purchase. You could save a lot of weight by buying a carver frame and their carbon fork. The frames are around 1300...pretty dang cheap.

  11. #11
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    I just got done dropping my Neco Pugs below the 30lb mark. Granted it is a single speed.

    I built up a Marge lite rear rim with a DT Swiss 240 hub, and laced it with wheelsmith 2.0/1.8 spokes and brass nipples. The total weight of the wheel built up with a rotor was 1302 grams. Stock wheel weight was 1705 grams.

    I replaced the MWOD cranks with Raceface Turbine, which dropped another 200 grams.

    Other non stock items are Devo saddle, Thomson stem and post, UL Knard tires and Quality tubes.

    I replaced the front fork with a Keller model that actually is a few grams heavier then the stock Moonlander fork. But it is a much better ride.

    I also drilled out the non used spoke holes in the front wheel.

    My Pugs is my everyday bike and I'm good with the weight it is now. I love this thing. All the other bikes are sitting in the basement collecting dust.
    Fat and Single

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hssp View Post
    Clown Shoe/Bud is giving me more days on the trails when it is snowing, so they stay, and dropper post came on after first two rides (never riding without one in technical terrain).

    The Carver fork is lightweight and nice, but I heard it does flex a lot when pushed... A friend got one for his wife but not for himself.

    Anyone know the weight of the MWOD cranks including BB? Cannot find any info on the webb (and I am too lazy to check myself).
    MWOD cranks / BB came in around 1060 grams if I remember correctly. This is with both rings attached.
    Fat and Single

  13. #13
    Human Test Subject
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    Quote Originally Posted by DubzOxford View Post
    MWOD cranks / BB came in around 1060 grams if I remember correctly. This is with both rings attached.
    The rings/BG weigh 193g. Surly cranks really aren't as bad as people think

  14. #14
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    My 20" Necro Pug is right around 34 pounds. My wife's 17" stock with Fixation pedals and Race Face post is 36 pounds.

    All stock except:

    Drilled rear Rolling Daryl (shop upgraded during warranty to mismatched pair!)
    Thomson Elite stem and X4 stem
    Specialized alloy bar
    Specialized Phenom saddle
    Shimano XT cassette (much lighter than stock cassette)
    Split tube tubeless with 4 cups Stan's (heavier than ultralight 29er tubes but NO flats)
    Avid Elixr CR hydro brakeset
    Time ATAC pedals
    Last edited by hunttofu; 07-10-2013 at 10:35 AM. Reason: Brakes added Size added

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schott View Post
    I think the best bet is going Ti. Lifelong lite weight purchase...
    I've been considering a Ti frame for my next fatbike. (I have a CX bike and a 29er in Ti).

    I've decided against it because I can't see any advantage inherent in a Ti frame on a bike with 4-5" tyres. An alloy fatbike frame can be made lighter at much less cost and be just as good to ride.

    The only reason I can find for me owning a Ti fatbike is aesthetic and my propensity for buying shiny things.



    Edit: I'm about to strip down my fatbikes for a bit of preventative maintenance. Maybe I should try a light build on the Pug for fun - see how low it will go without spending up.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  16. #16
    nvphatty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Maybe I should try a light build on the Pug for fun - see how low it will go without spending up.
    give it a go for sub 30lbs.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I've been considering a Ti frame for my next fatbike. (I have a CX bike and a 29er in Ti).

    I've decided against it because I can't see any advantage inherent in a Ti frame on a bike with 4-5" tyres. An alloy fatbike frame can be made lighter at much less cost and be just as good to ride.

    The only reason I can find for me owning a Ti fatbike is aesthetic and my propensity for buying shiny things.
    Advantages of Ti include: lighter than steel, no rust/oxidation, no paint, less likely to dent, finish can be restored to like new by amateur with steel wool, generally more durable than steel or aluminum, repairable without having to repaint, resale value. And it has intangible magical properties. That's all I can think of at the moment.

  18. #18
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    My 18" pug is at 35 lbs right now, with most of the weight in the wheels. Still running the good ol' double wall LM rims, XT rear hub, Surly front hub. 27tpi Larrys and still tubed.

    Mods from stock:

    Loaded X-Lite carbon bars
    Loaded AmXC 100mm stem
    Shimano SLX 2x10 drivetrain/shifters

    I'm going to at list set it up tubeless and may drill out the LM's, which should drop a considerable amount of weight. Other planned upgrades include a Loaded seatpost and possibly Shimano SLX or XT brakes. Figure all that should get me down closer to 30 lbs.

    I'd like to do a Marge Lite wheelset, but if I'm going to do another wheelset, I'd rather go with a Rabbit Hole 29+ build to use for rides when I don't need the extra float...

    I'm guessing you already have the cutouts in the clownshoe and the rolling darryl. If not, drill those suckers out and set 'em up tubeless. That's as close to free weight saving as you can get. That dropper post isn't doing you any favors in the weight department, either. A carbon fork will definitely help drop some weight, too.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  19. #19
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    This is a very old thread. But Im just wondering if anyone else has attempted to build a light Pugsley. I am looking at trying to slim down my Pug this winter. Maybe try to hit 24lbs or so.

  20. #20
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    Four years ago I was thinking of building a light Pug, but never got round to it because I bought a featherweight plastic fantastic.

    But I prefer riding the Pug - I can be more brutal with it.

    I'm about to start prepping it for a 24 hour event, and I may just weight weenie it as much as possible without spending anymore money on it.

    I'll aim for about 28lbs. I don't think 24 is possible without mucho wallet lightening.

    (Or will my next post here be in another 4 years? )
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  21. #21
    This place needs an enema
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Maybe try to hit 24lbs or so.

    How?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Four years ago I was thinking of building a light Pug, but never got round to it because I bought a featherweight plastic fantastic.

    But I prefer riding the Pug - I can be more brutal with it.

    I'm about to start prepping it for a 24 hour event, and I may just weight weenie it as much as possible without spending anymore money on it.

    I'll aim for about 28lbs. I don't think 24 is possible without mucho wallet lightening.

    (Or will my next post here be in another 4 years? )
    Yes, I have/had other fat bikes but keep coming back to the Pug. Fantastic ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    How?
    By breaking the bank.

    For starters, I was thinking about ordering those offset Lightbicycle 65mm rims (500g, I believe) and having it shipped direct to you, along with some 240s rear hub and some sort of light front hub. I've got lots of carbon components I could hang on it as well. I don't know where that will end up, but I'm sure it'll be a fun bike.

  23. #23
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    No hurt to building one up on paper first.
    24 seems very ambitious to me. North of 26-27, sure.

  24. #24
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    24lbs is unrealistic. My Ti fatbike is 24lbs with carbon Nextie rims (65mm), tubeless Jumbo Jims and Hope hubs and a mix of light stuff (bars, seatpost, etc.). My frame is 3lbs. I think the Pugs is close to 6lbs. I'd ditch the offset front wheel, which would open up more options for rims and forks. I use this fork, which is one of the dwindling few carbon ones available in the proper length and straight steerer for the Pugs: https://sarmabikes.com/collections-c...quick-release/

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    24lbs is unrealistic. My Ti fatbike is 24lbs with carbon Nextie rims (65mm), tubeless Jumbo Jims and Hope hubs and a mix of light stuff (bars, seatpost, etc.). My frame is 3lbs. I think the Pugs is close to 6lbs. I'd ditch the offset front wheel, which would open up more options for rims and forks. I use this fork, which is one of the dwindling few carbon ones available in the proper length and straight steerer for the Pugs: https://sarmabikes.com/collections-c...quick-release/
    Thanks. Looks like they're out of stock on those forks, unfortunately.

    My front wheel/fork is already non-offset. Which I'll keep that way.

    I was just shooting from the hip with the 24lb figure. Biggest thing for me is to get some light wheels, which would (hopefully) make the bike feel more lively.

  26. #26
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    I currently own a 23.9 lb Pugs, however it is a Single Speed.

    Velobike is right, for you to get a geared Pugs down to 24lbs it is going to cost some serious stew. Out of all the bikes I own, I continue to go back to my Pugs. I just love the way it rides.
    Fat and Single

  27. #27
    nvphatty
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    My pugs was 30lbs ready to ride. I could have certainly shaved 1-2lbs without tossing my visa @ it since it was a frame up build.

  28. #28
    This place needs an enema
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    By breaking the bank.

    For starters, I was thinking about ordering those offset Lightbicycle 65mm rims (500g, I believe) and having it shipped direct to you, along with some 240s rear hub and some sort of light front hub. I've got lots of carbon components I could hang on it as well. I don't know where that will end up, but I'm sure it'll be a fun bike.

    I'm happy to help, of course.

    That said, you'll end with a lighter bike, and less money spent, by starting from scratch with a different chassis.

    The Pugs is a great bike. Surly never cared a whit about it being light.

  29. #29
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    Oh, yes, of course. I could buy a Canyon Dude or any of the carbon wonderbikes for less money.

    I've had lighter CF/AL bikes. Pug just has a certain quirky charm I appreciate. I'm rebuilding one, which will have the BB shaved down to 83mm to narrow the q factor. Then proceed to throw money at it which will return few pennies on the dollar if I ever decide to sell it. I'll be in touch.

  30. #30
    This place needs an enema
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Pug just has a certain quirky charm I appreciate.

    And that there is reason enough. Good luck with it.

  31. #31
    turtles make me hot
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    I just realized this thread is from 2013 but it sounds like you still have the bike.
    I used to ride my fat bike with Clownshoes with Bud and Lou year round. Then I tried a Knard on the rear and then I built new wheels with My Other Brother Darryls. Best mod I ever made.
    The bike felt like I was dragging a log with the Clownshoes. Once I put the MOBDarryls on it, it was like an awakening. Bike felt fantastic. I still run Bud on the front and a 4.8 Knard on the rear for trails. Lou for snow. Maybe a new 4.3 Edna would fit on the back of your bike.
    I like turtles

  32. #32
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    My current Pugs weighs in at 31 pounds, with tubes, heavy Nates and Rolling Darryl rims, plus Dinglespeed set up. With Chineseum fork and rims, I could drop 3-4 pounds, but then I am looking at $700-800 in parts plus wheel rebuilding. I would rather buy a second, lighter fatty and keep the Pugs as is.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  33. #33
    Is dang happy!
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    I think my aluminum Motobacon fb4 frame and fork weighed almost 3lbs less than my friend's pug. It has the Same goofy asymmetrical rear end. Probably the cheapest way to save that much weight.

    My wheels on the other hand weigh three lbs. more than his so he has that going for him.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  34. #34
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    The OP of the linked thread gave it a go

    My Surly Pugsley

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stopbreakindown View Post
    The OP of the linked thread gave it a go

    My Surly Pugsley
    Cool build. Wish I could see the pictures...

  36. #36
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    Double ressurection for an early halloween.

    I recently weighed my Pugsley - 29.8 lbs with 1 bottle cage and pedals

    Steel frame and offset fork, size large
    Light bicycle 65mm rims, DT Swiss 240 rear, Paul Components SS as front, Double butted spokes and brass nipples
    Van Helgas, tubeless with probably too much sealant
    Race Face Next SL cranks w/ 32t dm Chromag 6mm offset ring, couple years old
    Gravity Dropper 100mm dropper seatpost with remote
    WTB Volt saddle, nothing fancy
    Shimano XT Brakes w/ 180mm rotors, 11 speed 11-42 cassette, derailleur, rear shifter, and pedals
    Answer Carbon 31.mm x 720mm Handle Bars
    Thomson 80mm stem
    Oury grips
    Cane creek 110 headset
    Wheels Mfg BB
    Last edited by mattgVT; 1 Week Ago at 06:30 PM. Reason: adding frame size, stem

  37. #37
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    Pics!

  38. #38
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    Or.... load up that Pug with gear, food, and water and go for a nice long tour. When you return and unload it wont seem heavy and you might not care. Its a Pugsley after all!

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