Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    28

    Help with wheel width 80 or 100mm

    All, long time lurker and up until now I have been able to find all my answers by searching. I am building a Fatty and I am torn on the wheels. I will be using a CS-N019 frame that will take up to a 5" tire. I am moving to Alaska next year so I will see some snow use.

    My thought was to go with the 100mm Carbon wheelset and run Bud/Lou for summer and a studded tire for winter. Going to order the frame and wheelset soon, just can't decide what will be best for my uses, 80mm or 100mm.

    Having never ridden a fatty I don't have any experience to fall back on. Any help/opinions would be appreciated. Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    438
    100mm is too fat for summer. Budget for a 65mm summer wheelset (or maybe 27+ or 29+ depending on what that frame will accommodate)and an 80 or 100mm winter. You don't need carbon unless you are making your living riding bikes. Finally, buy used. Fat bike trader on FB is one source.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    356
    This thread already has most recent thoughts:

    Rim width thoughts?

    100mm for more snow than dirt
    65mm for more dirt than snow(or packed snow)
    80mm best all round

    There are 90mm rims too ...


    Chris.

  4. #4
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,717
    I tell everyone the same thing. I got 100's.
    My friend has 82's.
    We both run Bud and Lou. He's about 60 pounds lighter than I am. His bike is faster and more nimble than mine. I probably should have gotten Darryls instead of Clownshoes.
    I am going to build Darryls for my bike as soon as I can afford to. The Clownshoes will become beach-snow wheels.
    I just finished a bike for my son, so my bike budget is blown right now. Every time I'm about to build a new wheelset or something for myself, my giant son outgrows another bike and my stuff has to wait.
    I like turtles

  5. #5
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,361
    I got 90mm carbon rims in Alaska.

    They are one of the best things I did for my fatbike. With dillinger 5 studded tires, the bike was unstoppable and a totally different ride than my 75/4.0 ride last year. The float and ability to ride the trails is worth it. Much less frustrating with this wider combo when the center of the trail is packed, but the edges are soft.

    If you're going to ride it all year round, get something slightly skinnier, but for winter, these rims/wheels have been awesome. We got amazing enough summer trails that I have no want to ride my fatbike in the summer, my AM bike is way too much fun.

    If I had the $$$, I'd have 65, 80 and 90mm carbon rims, and I'd switch them out for conditions/races as necessary. Some people can afford this and do just this. For maximum winter fun though, I have to recommend the 90 carbons. If you can't go 90, 80 isn't too bad as a secondary. 100mm is great too, but I'm not sure I'd go that wide, as the 90mm can still be decent in the summer and is a little more flexible for tire sizes (getting a rounded profile).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    37
    I ride mostly dirt and recently switched from 80mm to 100mm rims. I am running bud/Lou combo.

    I the 100mm rims over the 80's.

    Are they faster? It depends. Do you expect to go just as fast as a 29er on hard pack trails? Then, no the 80m rims are your choice.

    I like the float and grip of the combo on the 100mm rims. In comparison, the 80's are a little less comfortable in the float department, and the bigger tires tend to wobble more on 80's. I can run a lower pressure without loosing performance in cornering and float using the 100's

    Sure, the wheel is heavier, and the tire may not roll as fast on the hard pack. That is not necessarily a bad thing.

    If I were building a bike up now, I would use a 90 or 100 mm rim. If that did not do it for me in the summer, I would get a set of 27+ rims with 4in. tires when they are available next year.

    Enjoy your new ride.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    28
    Thanks, this will primarily be a winter rig, I have a S-works AM and a 29er HT when I am feeling young and yes, if I just love the fatty I can build another set of summer wheels.

  8. #8
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,826
    I agree with jayem that D5s on 90 mm carbon rims are a dreamy combination for winter use. I don't recommend 4" tires on 90s in rocky terrain though. 65s or B plus are better choices on dirt.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Swerny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,883
    I think having 2 sets, 65 and 90 would be the perfect setup (except if cost was not a concern).

    If you can only have 1 set, then get 80
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2017 Trek Farley 9.6 with Lauf
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc

  10. #10
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    Aziator, the 100 mm carbon rims are sweet. You won't talk to many who have a set. You should know that most bikes won't handle the 100 mm carbon and 5 inch tire combination well. The tires get bigger when ran tubeless and most won't have the room in the rear. I have the 100 mm HED rims and love them but those are my snow only rims. I also have a couple sets of 80 mm carbon wheels. The HEDs are wicked light and there would be no reason to go to anything in the 60 mm category. Tires in the winter do perform differently between the 80 and the 100s. With the Alaskan trails getting packed out pretty quickly, the 80s might be the way to go.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Aziator, the 100 mm carbon rims are sweet. You won't talk to many who have a set. You should know that most bikes won't handle the 100 mm carbon and 5 inch tire combination well. The tires get bigger when ran tubeless and most won't have the room in the rear. I have the 100 mm HED rims and love them but those are my snow only rims. I also have a couple sets of 80 mm carbon wheels. The HEDs are wicked light and there would be no reason to go to anything in the 60 mm category. Tires in the winter do perform differently between the 80 and the 100s. With the Alaskan trails getting packed out pretty quickly, the 80s might be the way to go.
    Thanks for the info. Peter at XM Carbon Speed assures me they will work so I am going to get them. My buddies in AZ are running 90mm on dirt and love them so I will try 100. If I don't like them I will build another set and keep the 100s for snow only.

  12. #12
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,361
    Quote Originally Posted by aziator View Post
    Thanks for the info. Peter at XM Carbon Speed assures me they will work so I am going to get them. My buddies in AZ are running 90mm on dirt and love them so I will try 100. If I don't like them I will build another set and keep the 100s for snow only.
    This last winter, I rode all the time, through the storms, after the storms, before the storms, everything. Trails only get packed from riding. For races on packed courses, usually skinnier is better, unless it's snowing at the time or just snowed significantly overnight, but for personal "ride as much as possible in all conditions", it's hard to beat a wider rim/tire combination, plus you get more cush too. There's more than one ride I did last winter where I rode up on a relatively packed trail, but chose to ride down on an unpacked one that would not have been possible to either ride up, or ride down on my older setup, but it was like first tracks with a snowboard or skis and sooooo much fun to be able to ride that stuff confidently and securely. Riding in the "fresh" is a whole different fatbike experience and tons of fun. In those conditions, it can either be tons of fun, or extremely frustrating.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,037
    80 mm jackalope rims set up tubeless really nice. Just saying.

  14. #14
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    but it was like first tracks with a snowboard or skis and sooooo much fun to be able to ride that stuff confidently and securely. Riding in the "fresh" is a whole different fatbike experience and tons of fun. In those conditions, it can either be tons of fun, or extremely frustrating.
    fresh tracks ftw! we get ALOT of that around southern maine. this photo was from a 15 mile loop before work. love the nickel and dime snowfalls. this was 2-4" of perfection.

    65mm marge lites and 3.8 knards. great setup for damN near everything.


  15. #15
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,826
    I dunno Rog, looks like a white sidewalk...

    This is more to my liking. 3.8 on 65s so I know you'll approve. 80s, 100s, it's all good!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help with wheel width 80 or 100mm-pugs-sunny-track-1-18-13-medium-.jpg  


  16. #16
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    I dunno Rog, looks like a white sidewalk...

    This is more to my liking. 3.8 on 65s so I know you'll approve. 80s, 100s, it's all good!
    Ya but it's fresh!

    Nice trail mang!

  17. #17
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    3.8 on 65 will work if you live where it doesn't snow much or have nicely groomed trails. Good luck with that combination in real snow.




  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    1,723
    Ut Oh - getting out of Rog's way....

  19. #19
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    Yeah ok no go ride back up that lil knoll that you snowplowed down, jabronie!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    1,723
    Give my regards to Dennis and Dee

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpfurn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    Yeah ok no go ride back up that lil knoll that you snowplowed down, jabronie!
    Are you saying 3.8 on 65's would climb that hill? I'd put my money the hundo's with Bud Lou make it up farther with the same rider!

  22. #22
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    Are you saying 3.8 on 65's would climb that hill? I'd put my money the hundo's with Bud Lou make it up farther with the same rider!
    no, neither would make it most likely, but the 65's and 3.8's would have more fun going down it. more face shots!!!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpfurn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    no, neither would make it most likely, but the 65's and 3.8's would have more fun going down it. more face shots!!!
    Word!

Similar Threads

  1. Bad knees - width of 100mm bottom brackets
    By AnimalBikeman in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 06-21-2014, 06:01 AM
  2. wheel width
    By Tyler.podany in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-16-2014, 09:35 AM
  3. Wheel width VS tire width
    By Fox Fire in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-30-2012, 01:03 PM
  4. Minimum rim width for a MTB wheel
    By Midle Age Warrior in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-23-2011, 12:45 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.