Results 1 to 83 of 83
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618

    I've recently decided to purchase a Fat Bike to use on our excellent trails and beaches around southern Lake Michigan.

    Great information here to help me understand what to look for in a fattie. I'm a long time roadie and worked in a shop for years when I was much younger, so I have the tools and knowledge.

    I decided to purchase a GMC Yukon spec'd by Kent. After looking at many of the low cost options that are available, the basic reasons for selecting this one are:

    - Cheapest aluminum frame fat bike available - $321 delivered
    - BB width of 120 mm and rear spacing at 190 mm

    I see this as a platform for upgrade as needed. The first steps will be to break it down, clean, lube and adjust everything. Tires will be removed and replaced with Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's set up tubeless.

    Attached are other specs, any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Update: Rear axle spacing is 197 mm, not 190 as published by Kent.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-kent-gmc-yukon-info.jpg  

    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:11 PM.

  2. #2
    beer thief
    Reputation: radair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    4,753
    Like most things, you get what you pay for. Hopefully the 44 pound beast does not turn you off to fat biking, which is a load of fun.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Agreed, Radair.

    I don't expect this to be high end, but a platform to upgrade as needed. For a low dollar entry point.

    From what I understand, replacing the stock tires on this could shed as much as 6 lbs.

    After that, a sealed bottom bracket, seatpost and relacing the rims with decent hubs would be next on the list.

  4. #4
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Agreed, Radair.

    I don't expect this to be high end, but a platform to upgrade as needed. For a low dollar entry point.

    From what I understand, replacing the stock tires on this could shed as much as 6 lbs.

    After that, a sealed bottom bracket, seatpost and relacing the rims with decent hubs would be next on the list.
    Ummm, if you expect that thing to use a standard bottom bracket, you might be sorely mistaken. Plenty of these bargain basement fatbikes have a bb that can't really be upgraded. This one sounds like it'll be one of those. Don't expect to shed anything close to 6lbs with the particular tires you've selected, either. To save that much weight, you'd probably have to spend almost as much on tires as you have on this whole bike.

  5. #5
    Your bike sucks
    Reputation: Carl Mega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,461
    I feel like putting a few of the $$ towards those parts are you planning to replace will get you a much better platform to start from. I'd say even the bikesdirect one at $500 (maybe even less?) is a better starting point; I'm sure there are more.

    High tensile fork is scary - that's BMX-lang for "bends day 1".

  6. #6
    fat guy on a little bike
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    355
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    I'd say even the bikesdirect one at $500 (maybe even less?) is a better starting point; I'm sure there are more.
    Agreed. Start with a Motobecane at least. That GMC one looks like a clunker... :O

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    Welcome to the madness. I would caution you not to put too much money in upgrades on the bike. Even a set of cheap tires would put your total cost in the range of some other entry-level bikes, so just use and enjoy the bike as is, and if you love it, start saving for a replacement.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Frame and components look pretty good.

    Pedals are one piece Al castings. Seatpost is 27.2, I will replace it with a longer alloy one.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-4b93d8b1-f141-4884-8f2b-5b8bdf141ae9.jpeg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-144c3a45-d5e7-4edc-a7f0-6cd5f8279668.jpeg  


  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    60
    Honestly, the information available here should have led you away from that bike. I too started with a similar bike, a dolomite. I was stubborn thinking I could turn that turd of a bike into something I was proud of. It didn't happen. After a couple of rides, I went to my local Bike Source and plunked down a deposit on Fatboy. The first ride on a Fatboy was amazing. I wasnt fighting the tires, or the weight of the bike, I was enjoying the ride. I wasn't worried about subpar components, or what my next upgrade needed to be. Not too long after that I purchased an NOS Bucksaw. Game over.

    Ride the bike. Don't upgrade it. Conclude you like Fatbiking. Buy a better bike.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    The only upgrades I am doing now are to install a longer alloy seatpost and Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires mounted tubeless.

    End result will be an 120/197/150 spaced aluminum frame fattie with decent tires. For less than $500.

    But if I could find a reasonably priced 190 mm internal gear hub . . .
    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:11 PM.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    60
    If you're happy with it, by all means. I would still encourage you to look at Bikes Direct or, better yet, the used market in your area. I don't regret starting with a Dolomite. Sure in hindsight that money could have been better spent elsewhere. But despite is flaws, I had a grin from ear to ear.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by kelbo View Post
    I would still encourage you to look at Bikes Direct
    I did look at those. Their lowest cost aluminum frame models were more expensive and did not have the wider BB or dropouts that this one has for fatter tires.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I did look at those. Their lowest cost aluminum frame models were more expensive and did not have the wider BB or dropouts that this one has for fatter tires.
    Sometimes BD's "discount" site has nice offers: bikeisland.com.
    To the OP: heed the advice. You're not being original, smart nor thrifty. If you plan on actually riding that bike (as in putting over 1K miles/year on something other than road or manicured trails) save your money and understand there's no such thing as a rideable sub $500 fattie.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,881
    Sorry Paul, but that bike is a turd just as other posters have suggested.

    You own it now, so I'd suggest adding nothing, ride it till you decide to buy a better bike.

    If it's not too late to return it, that would be your best choice.

    No amount of money will improve this bike, you got a "walmart special".

    Also, why are you cross posting between two forums?? Maybe you should pick one, like the one where you are a senior member?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    The only upgrades I am doing now are to install a longer alloy seatpost and Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires mounted tubeless.

    End result will be an 120/190/150 spaced aluminum frame fattie with decent tires. For less than $500.

    But if I could find a reasonably priced 190 mm internal gear hub . . .

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    174
    It is never a good investment to buy like that.
    A used bike for the same price is always much better.
    Go help old people if you have spare time, buying and replacing is a $$ pit, stop that madness.
    Things to be changed
    - tires
    - wheels
    - brakes
    - transmission
    just to start, so i am sorry it is too late you will have to pay to learn.
    But for others and your next bike, i buy quality bikes that are 5-10 years old and they just roll well because i stay away from junk. Any el cheapo needs to be adjusted frequently. All the best

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    For about the same investment, you could have gotten:

    https://www.the-house.com/qfrmin115b...med-bikes.html
    2016 El Oso Grande

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    400
    Not to pile on here, but you could’ve bought a pretty quality used bike for $500. Locally, there was a Mukluk for $425 (obviously sold quick), and a Pugsley for $500. Much, MUCH better bike, both in geometry and components. Like said above, I’d just ride this bike as-is with no more “upgrades” and sell it once you find a decent bike.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3,881
    The responses so far are not anything like a bike snob pile on.

    This guy bought an el cheap o bike in hopes of upgrading. The problem is that the bike is so cheaply made that no upgrade will make it safe for mountain biking; it was designed for casual use on paved trails.

    Like many posters suggested, he could have saved his money on “parts he’ll upgrade” added that to the price of the bike, then bought something worthy.

    $500 is not a lot of money for a bike and is a great starting point for an entry level fat bike, esp a used bike.

    He’ll figure it out in time, at which he’ll remember this thread and wish he’d listened to sage advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    400
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    The responses so far are not anything like a bike snob pile on.

    This guy bought an el cheap o bike in hopes of upgrading. The problem is that the bike is so cheaply made that no upgrade will make it safe for mountain biking; it was designed for casual use on paved trails.

    Like many posters suggested, he could have saved his money on “parts he’ll upgrade” added that to the price of the bike, then bought something worthy.

    $500 is not a lot of money for a bike and is a great starting point for an entry level fat bike, esp a used bike.

    He’ll figure it out in time, at which he’ll remember this thread and wish he’d listened to sage advice.
    Agreed. I don’t know how suggesting BD, used Surly and Salsa would be considered snobbery, in any shape or form. I’ve personally ridden one of those bikes and mid-ride, the crank fell right off the bike. Upon inspection, it was not only put together poorly, but I could see the overall design made it prone to the arm falling off. Crappy bike is one thing, but if it leads to injury, buying quality is cheap insurance.

  21. #21
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.
    No. This discussion is about being realistic with what the bike is built for.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I appreciate the advice, and duly noted.

    I have decades of experience with bikes, worked in a shop for years, and have assembled hundreds of bikes. The frame on this not bad. Have any of those commenting negatively actually seen one of these?

    I have no confusion of this being a high end bike. Reviews on Amazon are positive.

    Outside of the stock tires and seapost, only failed items will be upgraded

    I plan to go outside and have fun with it.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    That's good thinking, Paul.

    What I can't get my head around is the weight: How can an aluminum bike be so damned heavy?
    2016 El Oso Grande

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Also, why are you cross posting between two forums?? Maybe you should pick one, like the one where you are a senior member?
    I don't see a problem with cross-posting. You get more diverse answers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post

    Outside of the stock tires and seapost, only failed items will be upgraded

    I plan to go outside and have fun with it.
    Good plan, and keep the OEM tires so you can re-use the new (presumably good) tires you bought on possible future bikes.

    Buying a bargain bin bike to begin with is a good way to learn what you actually want in a fatbike. Just make the financial decision when it comes to upgradeitis, that a new bike will be cheaper. Many people here bought the $500 fatbike (which is not bad), but ended up upgrading hundreds of $ and still have a bike with limited tire width etc.

    You need to gain experience before speccing out a possible dreambike. This bike will give you an idea what gearing you may want (typically very low gearing in snow etc.). You may also wonder if you want suspension, a 2x or 1x drivetrain etc. Actually riding will answer some of those question at a cost less than a suspension fork.

    Obviously its all about fun.

    You mentioned you picked that because of the 120mm BB. what is that about? It seems 100 mm BB are not limiting tire width.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    Thick wall, straight gauge, heavy weld beads, that's pretty much it.

    And yes, when you rag on somebody for a purchase they have already made, it reeks of snobbery.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    You mentioned you picked that because of the 120mm BB. what is that about? It seems 100 mm BB are not limiting tire width.
    I thought this would be a good option to have for possible future wider tires. Cups on this BB are old school fixed/adjustable cones with a square taper spindle.

    Rear spacing measures 197 mm, not 190 mm as listed by Kent. Front is 150 mm.

    The original tires, tubes, and rim strips weigh a lot, I don't have an accurate scale that goes that high. The bare wheels are pretty light. Hubs are loose bearing, about what I expect at this price point. I have them lubed and adjusted properly, they are OK and should provide good service.

    For the new 120 TPI Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's, I'll set them up tubeless with shrink wrap to minimize rotational weight. Then take a total bike weight in riding form.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I thought this would be a good option to have for possible future wider tires. Cups on this BB are old school fixed/adjustable cones with a square taper spindle.

    Rear spacing measures 197 mm, not 190 mm as listed by Kent. Front is 150 mm.

    The original tires, tubes, and rim strips weigh a lot, I don't have an accurate scale that goes that high. The bare wheels are pretty light. Hubs are loose bearing, about what I expect at this price point. I have them lubed and adjusted properly, they are OK and should provide good service.

    For the new 120 TPI Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's, I'll set them up tubeless with shrink wrap to minimize rotational weight. Then take a total bike weight in riding form.
    Hey Paul, sorry but I hadn't realized you already bought your bike! You sound like someone who enjoys a frequent bout of tinkering with your rides. Personally I love riding them best but different strokes, what?

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  28. #28
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    197? So are you saying you bought a walmart level bike with a thru axle? I have my doubts.

    197mm is a thru axle standard. It is very specific. 190mm is a QR/bolt on standard. It is not so specific, especially on cheap bikes built to sloppy tolerances.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    197? So are you saying you bought a walmart level bike with a thru axle? I have my doubts.

    197mm is a thru axle standard. It is very specific. 190mm is a QR/bolt on standard. It is not so specific, especially on cheap bikes built to sloppy tolerances.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    The rear hub is a solid axle with nuts, not QR or thru. It is not high quality, but what I would expect at this price level.

    You can have your doubts, but I have the bike in my stand and I measured the rear spacing. It is 197 mm.

    This is a decent frame, made in one of the Chinese factories that make millions of other bikes every year. Many of those frames have decals with other, assumed higher quality, brands.

    Kent is a very significant bicycle company, and recently started up US bicycle manufacturing. See Kent International Inc. - Manufacturing Today

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Thick wall, straight gauge, heavy weld beads, that's pretty much it.
    Also consider steel fork, seatpost, kickstand, and very heavy tires/tubes/rimstrips.

    I’ll post the final weight in riding condition with the alloy seatpost and tubeless tires.

    And thanks for your positive comments!

  31. #31
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    The rear hub is a solid axle with nuts, not QR or thru. It is not high quality, but what I would expect at this price level.

    You can have your doubts, but I have the bike in my stand and I measured the rear spacing. It is 197 mm.

    This is a decent frame, made in one of the Chinese factories that make millions of other bikes every year. Many of those frames have decals with other, assumed higher quality, brands.

    Kent is a very significant bicycle company, and recently started up US bicycle manufacturing. See Kent International Inc. - Manufacturing Today
    Being a bolt-on rear axle, it may measure 197 to you, but it is a 190 spec. 197 is a thru axle. There is no 197 qr/bolt on rear hub spacing. It is just sloppy tolerances.

    190qr/197 thru axle are the same width. The difference comes from how they are measured due to the differences between a qr and a thru axle. For all your claimed bike shop experience, you are awful naive.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    67
    I recently bought a mid-level Fatboy. There are a number of things about it that are not to my liking (especially compared to my higher-end carbon MTB and gravel bike). So all I do is go out and have a blast on it! Do the same.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    A fattie is a fattie. Fatties are FUN! Heavy fatties demand stronger riders and more stamina, that's all. Indistinct of what standard your rear-end fits into...

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I was able to weigh stock tires and the new ones. And I found a lighter seat in the parts cabinet. Big weight reduction with these changes.

    More frame pictures also.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-weight-reduction.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-bottom-bracket-pedal.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-bottom-bracket.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-rear-dropouts.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-seat-top-tubes.jpg  


  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    174
    So how much did you pay to buy it including taxes?
    and with improvements what is your total out of pocket?

  36. #36
    Is dang happy!
    Reputation: Mr. Doom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,290
    7 speed freewheels and the easy to bend axles on them should be illegal on adult bikes. A bike with a Cassette wheel is worth the extra coin IMO... Learn how to hammer your axle back into shape as finding a replacement is going to be difficult.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    8.6 pound loss is awfully (not "awful") great.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    791
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Being a bolt-on rear axle, it may measure 197 to you, but it is a 190 spec. 197 is a thru axle. There is no 197 qr/bolt on rear hub spacing. It is just sloppy tolerances.

    190qr/197 thru axle are the same width. The difference comes from how they are measured due to the differences between a qr and a thru axle.
    This statement piqued my interest since I'm new to Fat Bikes (hopefully I can get it out of the box, assemble and ride this weekend)...

    Anyway, These pictures seem to indicate there's the possibility of 190 and 197 OLDs in both QR and TA, so now I'm confused...

    Can you point me to any better link that explains this?

    Name:  p-5786ffa5c8467.png
Views: 603
Size:  85.5 KB

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-p-56cd8e2c40fdf.png

    Name:  p-56ed85e4600ae.png
Views: 603
Size:  174.4 KB
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  39. #39
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    This statement piqued my interest since I'm new to Fat Bikes (hopefully I can get it out of the box, assemble and ride this weekend)...

    Anyway, These pictures seem to indicate there's the possibility of 190 and 197 OLDs in both QR and TA, so now I'm confused...

    Can you point me to any better link that explains this?

    Name:  p-5786ffa5c8467.png
Views: 603
Size:  85.5 KB

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	p-56cd8e2c40fdf.png 
Views:	33 
Size:	50.1 KB 
ID:	1176050

    Name:  p-56ed85e4600ae.png
Views: 603
Size:  174.4 KB
    I guess there is no accounting for the chinese to do stupid $hit for no good reason.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    The Tsunami 4.9 weighs 1360 per tire. Are you going split tube? Don't forget to factor in Stan's or OrangeSeal weight.

    Still, a huge weight cut for that behemoth.
    2016 El Oso Grande

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: akacoke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    706
    Solely judging from the welds of the BB and rear drop outs from your pictures, those are not the welds from a experienced welder. the beads are very very thick, inconsistent and all over the place im afraid that this bike might not hold up well, looks like not up to par for offroad use. since you have already bought it. just enjoy it while you can. me personally would not have picked this bike to begin with nor spending any more money "updating" it. its the same as one of those type of situations like you have a 02 toyota prius, why would you wanna spend $500 to change out all your fluids and $400 to change the windshield. sure itd keep running but its an investment that you would never get back compare to if spending it to upgrade to another different car then instantly you have better features and resell value.
    17 Lynskey Fatskey
    07 Kona Stab
    14 Specialized Fatboy
    04 Santa Cruz V10

    My Parts for sale link

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I’m pretty sure the Chinese CNC machine that made those welds has done hundreds of thousands of frames that haven't failed.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    457
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I’m pretty sure the unskilled human that made those welds has done two or three frames that haven't failed.
    Fixed it for ya.

    I didn't wanna pile on here, but ya, those welds at the BB...yeesh. Make sure you've got your mouthguard in and seatbelt on at all times.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    Yeah, and that color... and those decals... and that name....
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    68
    OK, you guys are not very nice. I realize this isn't the greatest bike, and sure the OP didn't expect it to be the best bike ever, nor did he claim that. But let him ride and see and report how it all goes.
    2018 Motobecane Sturgis NX
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR1

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I was able to mount the tire tubeless on the front wheel using 2 layers of foam, stretch wrap, and 4 oz of Stans sealant. No leaks. These rims have a nice bead lock on them.

    The total weight of the front wheel with the Tsunami 4.9 folding bead 120 TPI tire, in as ridden condition, is 8 lbs (3.6 kg)

    Although I've searched, I have not been able to find any data on wheel with tire as ridden weight. How does this compare?

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    That's a respectable reduction for sure.
    2016 El Oso Grande

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Doom View Post
    7 speed freewheels and the easy to bend axles on them should be illegal on adult bikes. A bike with a Cassette wheel is worth the extra coin IMO... Learn how to hammer your axle back into shape as finding a replacement is going to be difficult.
    I've never bent an axle in all of the riding I have done since the early 70's.

    Neither has my wife or 3 kids. If they had, I would have known, as I am their bike mechanic.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    791
    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    OK, you guys are not very nice. I realize this isn't the greatest bike, and sure the OP didn't expect it to be the best bike ever, nor did he claim that. But let him ride and see and report how it all goes.
    Ditto.

    Looking forward to a ride report... hopeful with a buddy with a more spendy bike for comparison!
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  50. #50
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,130
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I've never bent an axle in all of the riding I have done since the early 70's.

    Neither has my wife or 3 kids. If they had, I would have known, as I am their bike mechanic.
    When I worked in shops, I saw broken axles on freewheel hubs of cheap bikes with regularity.

    Not everyone who rides a bike with a freewheel hub is going to break an axle, but some people do. While I don't have a problem with this sort of hub on hybrids and cruisers and whatnot, they have no place on mtb's nowadays.

  51. #51
    Your bike sucks
    Reputation: Carl Mega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,461
    OP - While I don't agree with a lot of your reasoning, I encourage you to ride your bike and report back. Go have fun; don't fuss too much unless you need or want to.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Finished setting up the rear wheel tubeless. Set both tires at 10 PSI.

    No issue with chain clearance with the Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires.

    Went for a 3 mile ride on our snowy roads. Rides great, very controllable, no funny stuff. Feels light and accelerates quickly. Wheels and bottom bracket are smooth. Gearing is adequate for the terrain we have here, which includes some very steep, but short, hills due to our duneland terrain. Brakes are good.

    Cost work up is $500 total.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-origin8-tsunami-4.9.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-origin8-tsunami-4.9-chain-clearance.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-first-ride-1.jpg  


  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Finished setting up the rear wheel tubeless. Set both tires at 10 PSI.

    No issue with chain clearance with the Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires.

    Went for a 3 mile ride on our snowy roads. Rides great, very controllable, no funny stuff. Feels light and accelerates quickly. Wheels and bottom bracket are smooth. Gearing is adequate for the terrain we have here, which includes some very steep, but short, hills due to our duneland terrain. Brakes are good.

    Cost work up is $500 total.
    Kudos Paul!
    Just out of curiosity, have you weighted your bike in it's final state?

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Thanks!

    My scale does not go over 30 lbs, so I was not able to weigh it. If my calculations are right, it should be 43.9 - 8.6 = 35.3 lbs.

    And virtually all of that is from changing the tires and setting them up tubeless.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Thanks!

    My scale does not go over 30 lbs, so I was not able to weigh it. If my calculations are right, it should be 43.9 - 8.6 = 35.3 lbs.

    And virtually all of that is from changing the tires and setting them up tubeless.
    Truly remarkable! If durability is half what could be expected it would be a very good bargain indeed.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I plan to ride it like this and have fun. If anything fails, I’ll document it.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    Nice work, Paul. Glad you are enjoying that beast.
    2016 El Oso Grande

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Paul: when (and if) you want to add squish to your budget fatttie's front I believe you'd find a rare deal in this:
    https://lunacycle.com/luna-lander-fat-suspension-fork/
    Don't know if you have looked but it's hard to find non tapered head tube ones, and anything not really a pogo stick at that price.
    That way you can one-up the ante and say you've got a (very nice, by the way) front squish fattie for less than $700!
    No affiliation whatsoever, that's just my go to place to electrify fatties. Check it out, cause you have there a good electric platform potential.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    Pardon me for interjecting here, but ebikes and motorized bikes in general just don't sit well with my notions of what a bicycle oughta be. Get out and pedal. Get stronger, not craftier. And that fork's not really an upgrade, IMO.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Pardon me for interjecting here, but ebikes and motorized bikes in general just don't sit well with my notions of what a bicycle oughta be. Get out and pedal. Get stronger, not craftier. And that fork's not really an upgrade, IMO.
    Yeah, well and since you're interjecting, allow me to explain: I pedal my share like the rest, you know. Personally, I don't get the same from pedalling than from an e-bike but rather that I would like to believe that a nice fattie based e-bike is quite a car alternative, in some (if not all) circumstances. I think we ought to wake up and do our share for the environment before it's too late.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    You ebike in to work in the snow?

  62. #62
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    2,333
    Not a bad bike but having a 24" version of this for my son (mongoose logan, exact same thing just smaller) your going to learn real fast how much that bottom bracket sucks. Not replaceable and going to play hell finding bearings.

    Also your weight calculations are off by about 8-10lbs. For my sons bike Ive built new wheels, put on carbon fiber bars, allow stem, seat post, shimano XT 9 speed, trailcraft craft set (shaved 1lbs just on the crank arms) tubeless etc. 1/2 of it I already had in parts bin, cranks I had to buy. As well as the hubs, rims, and spokes to build his wheels. I have maybe $400 invested. Couldnt justify buying a nice 24" fat bike for him cause he's not all that serious about riding.

    My 2011 Salsa Mukluk is 33lbs with rear rack and frame bag install, his weighs about 5-8lbs lbs more than mine (havent weighed his yet). Your on a 26" so I would be shocked if its under 40lbs yet.

    Nothing wrong with riding a cheap bike as long has you have no illusions about it and as long as you dont go upgrading it (just a giant waste of money, I know from experience).

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.

    US partner for Ravemen:
    www.rakclighting.com

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    174
    It is clear he is a distributor trying to sell a shitty bike.
    He could have saved picking up an abandonned bike by the sidewalk and write
    FAT with a marker. Shit is shit. His life he can do as he pleases but do not believe all the lies coming from him.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    It is clear he is a distributor trying to sell a shitty bike.
    He could have saved picking up an abandonned bike by the sidewalk and write
    FAT with a marker. Shit is shit. His life he can do as he pleases but do not believe all the lies coming from him.
    If you are referring to me, I am not in the bicycle business at all, and not trying to sell anything.

    The only thing I have posted in this thread are facts.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,650
    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    Paul: when (and if) you want to add squish to your budget fatttie's front I believe you'd find a rare deal in this:
    https://lunacycle.com/luna-lander-fat-suspension-fork/
    Don't know if you have looked but it's hard to find non tapered head tube ones, and anything not really a pogo stick at that price.
    That way you can one-up the ante and say you've got a (very nice, by the way) front squish fattie for less than $700!
    No affiliation whatsoever, that's just my go to place to electrify fatties. Check it out, cause you have there a good electric platform potential.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk
    Ah, fat e-bikes... something we can all agree on that does not belong in this forum.
    "Wait- I am confused" - SDMTB'er

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    I set up another one of these for my wife, this one has Origin8 Tsunami 4.0 120 TPI folding bead tires mounted tubeless.

    As pictured, hers is 33.8 lbs.

    These bikes have a lifetime frame and fork warranty.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-built-tsunami-4-tires.jpg  

    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 1 Week Ago at 12:03 PM.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post

    These bikes have a lifetime frame and fork warranty.
    It's this sentence right here that leads me to believe there is some truth to that distributor statement.


    Good on you for making the bike work for you. 33 pounds is pretty remarkable.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Paul: I crashed my fattie in the absolute boondocks of fat bikedom (Miami, FL) and had to resort to an Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 as I found the headquarters of their parent company is located here and consequently the LBS could get it sooner. How have you found them so far? Any bad habits? Self-steering, noisy?

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by kelbo View Post
    It's this sentence right here that leads me to believe there is some truth to that distributor statement.


    Good on you for making the bike work for you. 33 pounds is pretty remarkable.
    Thanks!

    But again, I am not in the bicycle business.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    These are fun!

    Worked perfectly, ride great.

    Very satisfied with this setup.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-4.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-1.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-2.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-3.jpg  


  71. #71
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    2,333
    Not even a helmet riding on snow and ice.....

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.

    US partner for Ravemen:
    www.rakclighting.com

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Not even a helmet riding on snow and ice.....
    You are right, and we talked about it afterwards. We always wear helmets on our road bikes.

    We will wear them from now on when riding fat.
    GMC Yukon
    Tsunami 4.9's tubeless

  73. #73
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    2,333
    I know people dont wear them for cruising around and such, but ya, snow and ice is one of those "asking to get hurt" moments. Just looking out.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.

    US partner for Ravemen:
    www.rakclighting.com

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Chain clearances in first gear with 4" and 4.9" tires.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    GMC Yukon
    Tsunami 4.9's tubeless

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Chain clearances in first gear with 4" and 4.9" tires.
    You know, I gather, that those Tsunamis aren't really 4.9's, do you? I have a copy mounted on 100 mm (4 inch) rims and they're actually closer to 4.6, a bit less perhaps.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    You know, I gather, that those Tsunamis aren't really 4.9's, do you?
    Paul, how about putting a calipers on the Tsunamis at their widest point?

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    227
    OP I'm glad you could piss off so many people on this forum with your thread! Bunch of whiny pissers on here telling you what to do with your money.

    Now here's what you should do with your money:

    If you every want more climbing power I like the Vulta 22/32/42 square tapered crank arm set (the 42T is removable). It's like $20 on amazon and that plus a cupset will be all you need to kkeep that BB riding smooth and for the most part moisture free.

    Also for the freewheel, the 8 speed sunrace 13-34 8 speed freewheel is a nice replacement with equal gears leading up to a nice granny first gear.

    Hit up one of the mongoose thread for what look to be a lot of interchangeable parts and less doubters.

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by Bimmer74 View Post
    Paul, how about putting a calipers on the Tsunamis at their widest point?
    At 5 PSI, 35 Degrees F, I get the following:

    Tsunami 4: Tread - 3.5" / Sidewall - 4.3"

    Tsunami 4.9: Tread - 4.1" / Sidewall - 5"
    GMC Yukon
    Tsunami 4.9's tubeless

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    55
    More fun
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-moon-valley-jan-2018.jpg  

    GMC Yukon
    Tsunami 4.9's tubeless

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    At 5 PSI, 35 Degrees F, I get the following:

    Tsunami 4: Tread - 3.5" / Sidewall - 4.3"

    Tsunami 4.9: Tread - 4.1" / Sidewall - 5"

    Many thanks... This is very helpful.

    Is there some database/spreadsheet of fatbike tire sizes (claimed and actual)?

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    2016 El Oso Grande

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    75
    Used a shop vise and measuring tape (can't find a large enough caliper). My tubeless Tsunami 4.9, sidewall to sidewall, reads 4 11/16" (4.6875 inches) on 100 mm (outer) rims @ 17 psi.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DirtyHun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    702
    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    Used a shop vise and measuring tape (can't find a large enough caliper). My tubeless Tsunami 4.9, sidewall to sidewall, reads 4 11/16" (4.6875 inches) on 100 mm (outer) rims @ 17 psi.
    That's probably pretty close. VERY few tires are wider than advertised.
    2016 El Oso Grande

Similar Threads

  1. New Bike hauler! 2015 GMC Canyon
    By SteveF in forum Cars and Bike Racks
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 03-05-2016, 10:09 AM
  2. Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-31-2014, 10:10 AM
  3. GMC Topkick, opinions?
    By Babafesh in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-03-2011, 08:14 PM

Members who have read this thread: 229

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •