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  1. #1
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    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618

    I've recently decided to purchase a Fat Bike to use on our excellent trails and beaches around southern Lake Michigan.

    Great information here to help me understand what to look for in a fattie. I'm a long time roadie and worked in a shop for years when I was much younger, so I have the tools and knowledge.

    I decided to purchase a GMC Yukon spec'd by Kent. After looking at many of the low cost options that are available, the basic reasons for selecting this one are:

    - Cheapest aluminum frame fat bike available - $321 delivered
    - BB width of 120 mm and rear spacing at 190 mm

    I see this as a platform for upgrade as needed. The first steps will be to break it down, clean, lube and adjust everything. Tires will be removed and replaced with Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's set up tubeless.

    Attached are other specs, any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Update: Rear axle spacing is 197 mm, not 190 as published by Kent.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-kent-gmc-yukon-info.jpg  

    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 01-02-2018 at 04:11 PM.

  2. #2
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    Like most things, you get what you pay for. Hopefully the 44 pound beast does not turn you off to fat biking, which is a load of fun.

  3. #3
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    Agreed, Radair.

    I don't expect this to be high end, but a platform to upgrade as needed. For a low dollar entry point.

    From what I understand, replacing the stock tires on this could shed as much as 6 lbs.

    After that, a sealed bottom bracket, seatpost and relacing the rims with decent hubs would be next on the list.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Agreed, Radair.

    I don't expect this to be high end, but a platform to upgrade as needed. For a low dollar entry point.

    From what I understand, replacing the stock tires on this could shed as much as 6 lbs.

    After that, a sealed bottom bracket, seatpost and relacing the rims with decent hubs would be next on the list.
    Ummm, if you expect that thing to use a standard bottom bracket, you might be sorely mistaken. Plenty of these bargain basement fatbikes have a bb that can't really be upgraded. This one sounds like it'll be one of those. Don't expect to shed anything close to 6lbs with the particular tires you've selected, either. To save that much weight, you'd probably have to spend almost as much on tires as you have on this whole bike.

  5. #5
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    I feel like putting a few of the $$ towards those parts are you planning to replace will get you a much better platform to start from. I'd say even the bikesdirect one at $500 (maybe even less?) is a better starting point; I'm sure there are more.

    High tensile fork is scary - that's BMX-lang for "bends day 1".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    I'd say even the bikesdirect one at $500 (maybe even less?) is a better starting point; I'm sure there are more.
    Agreed. Start with a Motobecane at least. That GMC one looks like a clunker... :O

  7. #7
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    Welcome to the madness. I would caution you not to put too much money in upgrades on the bike. Even a set of cheap tires would put your total cost in the range of some other entry-level bikes, so just use and enjoy the bike as is, and if you love it, start saving for a replacement.
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  8. #8
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    Frame and components look pretty good.

    Pedals are one piece Al castings. Seatpost is 27.2, I will replace it with a longer alloy one.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-4b93d8b1-f141-4884-8f2b-5b8bdf141ae9.jpeg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-144c3a45-d5e7-4edc-a7f0-6cd5f8279668.jpeg  


  9. #9
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    Honestly, the information available here should have led you away from that bike. I too started with a similar bike, a dolomite. I was stubborn thinking I could turn that turd of a bike into something I was proud of. It didn't happen. After a couple of rides, I went to my local Bike Source and plunked down a deposit on Fatboy. The first ride on a Fatboy was amazing. I wasnt fighting the tires, or the weight of the bike, I was enjoying the ride. I wasn't worried about subpar components, or what my next upgrade needed to be. Not too long after that I purchased an NOS Bucksaw. Game over.

    Ride the bike. Don't upgrade it. Conclude you like Fatbiking. Buy a better bike.

  10. #10
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    The only upgrades I am doing now are to install a longer alloy seatpost and Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires mounted tubeless.

    End result will be an 120/197/150 spaced aluminum frame fattie with decent tires. For less than $500.

    But if I could find a reasonably priced 190 mm internal gear hub . . .
    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 01-02-2018 at 04:11 PM.

  11. #11
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    If you're happy with it, by all means. I would still encourage you to look at Bikes Direct or, better yet, the used market in your area. I don't regret starting with a Dolomite. Sure in hindsight that money could have been better spent elsewhere. But despite is flaws, I had a grin from ear to ear.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelbo View Post
    I would still encourage you to look at Bikes Direct
    I did look at those. Their lowest cost aluminum frame models were more expensive and did not have the wider BB or dropouts that this one has for fatter tires.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I did look at those. Their lowest cost aluminum frame models were more expensive and did not have the wider BB or dropouts that this one has for fatter tires.
    Sometimes BD's "discount" site has nice offers: bikeisland.com.
    To the OP: heed the advice. You're not being original, smart nor thrifty. If you plan on actually riding that bike (as in putting over 1K miles/year on something other than road or manicured trails) save your money and understand there's no such thing as a rideable sub $500 fattie.

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  14. #14
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    Sorry Paul, but that bike is a turd just as other posters have suggested.

    You own it now, so I'd suggest adding nothing, ride it till you decide to buy a better bike.

    If it's not too late to return it, that would be your best choice.

    No amount of money will improve this bike, you got a "walmart special".

    Also, why are you cross posting between two forums?? Maybe you should pick one, like the one where you are a senior member?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    The only upgrades I am doing now are to install a longer alloy seatpost and Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires mounted tubeless.

    End result will be an 120/190/150 spaced aluminum frame fattie with decent tires. For less than $500.

    But if I could find a reasonably priced 190 mm internal gear hub . . .

  15. #15
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    It is never a good investment to buy like that.
    A used bike for the same price is always much better.
    Go help old people if you have spare time, buying and replacing is a $$ pit, stop that madness.
    Things to be changed
    - tires
    - wheels
    - brakes
    - transmission
    just to start, so i am sorry it is too late you will have to pay to learn.
    But for others and your next bike, i buy quality bikes that are 5-10 years old and they just roll well because i stay away from junk. Any el cheapo needs to be adjusted frequently. All the best

  16. #16
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    For about the same investment, you could have gotten:

    https://www.the-house.com/qfrmin115b...med-bikes.html
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  17. #17
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    Not to pile on here, but you couldíve bought a pretty quality used bike for $500. Locally, there was a Mukluk for $425 (obviously sold quick), and a Pugsley for $500. Much, MUCH better bike, both in geometry and components. Like said above, Iíd just ride this bike as-is with no more ďupgradesĒ and sell it once you find a decent bike.

  18. #18
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    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.
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  19. #19
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    The responses so far are not anything like a bike snob pile on.

    This guy bought an el cheap o bike in hopes of upgrading. The problem is that the bike is so cheaply made that no upgrade will make it safe for mountain biking; it was designed for casual use on paved trails.

    Like many posters suggested, he could have saved his money on ďparts heíll upgradeĒ added that to the price of the bike, then bought something worthy.

    $500 is not a lot of money for a bike and is a great starting point for an entry level fat bike, esp a used bike.

    Heíll figure it out in time, at which heíll remember this thread and wish heíd listened to sage advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    The responses so far are not anything like a bike snob pile on.

    This guy bought an el cheap o bike in hopes of upgrading. The problem is that the bike is so cheaply made that no upgrade will make it safe for mountain biking; it was designed for casual use on paved trails.

    Like many posters suggested, he could have saved his money on ďparts heíll upgradeĒ added that to the price of the bike, then bought something worthy.

    $500 is not a lot of money for a bike and is a great starting point for an entry level fat bike, esp a used bike.

    Heíll figure it out in time, at which heíll remember this thread and wish heíd listened to sage advice.
    Agreed. I donít know how suggesting BD, used Surly and Salsa would be considered snobbery, in any shape or form. Iíve personally ridden one of those bikes and mid-ride, the crank fell right off the bike. Upon inspection, it was not only put together poorly, but I could see the overall design made it prone to the arm falling off. Crappy bike is one thing, but if it leads to injury, buying quality is cheap insurance.

  21. #21
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Paul, you should also check out the weight-weenie forum, because apparently there are as many bike snobs over there as there are here.

    Better yet, ride your bike a ton, enjoy the Hell out of it, post pictures of the adventures, and revel in it.
    No. This discussion is about being realistic with what the bike is built for.

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  22. #22
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    I appreciate the advice, and duly noted.

    I have decades of experience with bikes, worked in a shop for years, and have assembled hundreds of bikes. The frame on this not bad. Have any of those commenting negatively actually seen one of these?

    I have no confusion of this being a high end bike. Reviews on Amazon are positive.

    Outside of the stock tires and seapost, only failed items will be upgraded

    I plan to go outside and have fun with it.

  23. #23
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    That's good thinking, Paul.

    What I can't get my head around is the weight: How can an aluminum bike be so damned heavy?
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Also, why are you cross posting between two forums?? Maybe you should pick one, like the one where you are a senior member?
    I don't see a problem with cross-posting. You get more diverse answers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post

    Outside of the stock tires and seapost, only failed items will be upgraded

    I plan to go outside and have fun with it.
    Good plan, and keep the OEM tires so you can re-use the new (presumably good) tires you bought on possible future bikes.

    Buying a bargain bin bike to begin with is a good way to learn what you actually want in a fatbike. Just make the financial decision when it comes to upgradeitis, that a new bike will be cheaper. Many people here bought the $500 fatbike (which is not bad), but ended up upgrading hundreds of $ and still have a bike with limited tire width etc.

    You need to gain experience before speccing out a possible dreambike. This bike will give you an idea what gearing you may want (typically very low gearing in snow etc.). You may also wonder if you want suspension, a 2x or 1x drivetrain etc. Actually riding will answer some of those question at a cost less than a suspension fork.

    Obviously its all about fun.

    You mentioned you picked that because of the 120mm BB. what is that about? It seems 100 mm BB are not limiting tire width.
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    Thick wall, straight gauge, heavy weld beads, that's pretty much it.

    And yes, when you rag on somebody for a purchase they have already made, it reeks of snobbery.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    You mentioned you picked that because of the 120mm BB. what is that about? It seems 100 mm BB are not limiting tire width.
    I thought this would be a good option to have for possible future wider tires. Cups on this BB are old school fixed/adjustable cones with a square taper spindle.

    Rear spacing measures 197 mm, not 190 mm as listed by Kent. Front is 150 mm.

    The original tires, tubes, and rim strips weigh a lot, I don't have an accurate scale that goes that high. The bare wheels are pretty light. Hubs are loose bearing, about what I expect at this price point. I have them lubed and adjusted properly, they are OK and should provide good service.

    For the new 120 TPI Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's, I'll set them up tubeless with shrink wrap to minimize rotational weight. Then take a total bike weight in riding form.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I thought this would be a good option to have for possible future wider tires. Cups on this BB are old school fixed/adjustable cones with a square taper spindle.

    Rear spacing measures 197 mm, not 190 mm as listed by Kent. Front is 150 mm.

    The original tires, tubes, and rim strips weigh a lot, I don't have an accurate scale that goes that high. The bare wheels are pretty light. Hubs are loose bearing, about what I expect at this price point. I have them lubed and adjusted properly, they are OK and should provide good service.

    For the new 120 TPI Origin8 Tsunami 4.9's, I'll set them up tubeless with shrink wrap to minimize rotational weight. Then take a total bike weight in riding form.
    Hey Paul, sorry but I hadn't realized you already bought your bike! You sound like someone who enjoys a frequent bout of tinkering with your rides. Personally I love riding them best but different strokes, what?

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  28. #28
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    197? So are you saying you bought a walmart level bike with a thru axle? I have my doubts.

    197mm is a thru axle standard. It is very specific. 190mm is a QR/bolt on standard. It is not so specific, especially on cheap bikes built to sloppy tolerances.

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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    197? So are you saying you bought a walmart level bike with a thru axle? I have my doubts.

    197mm is a thru axle standard. It is very specific. 190mm is a QR/bolt on standard. It is not so specific, especially on cheap bikes built to sloppy tolerances.

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    The rear hub is a solid axle with nuts, not QR or thru. It is not high quality, but what I would expect at this price level.

    You can have your doubts, but I have the bike in my stand and I measured the rear spacing. It is 197 mm.

    This is a decent frame, made in one of the Chinese factories that make millions of other bikes every year. Many of those frames have decals with other, assumed higher quality, brands.

    Kent is a very significant bicycle company, and recently started up US bicycle manufacturing. See Kent International Inc. - Manufacturing Today

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    Quote Originally Posted by deuxdiesel View Post
    Thick wall, straight gauge, heavy weld beads, that's pretty much it.
    Also consider steel fork, seatpost, kickstand, and very heavy tires/tubes/rimstrips.

    Iíll post the final weight in riding condition with the alloy seatpost and tubeless tires.

    And thanks for your positive comments!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    The rear hub is a solid axle with nuts, not QR or thru. It is not high quality, but what I would expect at this price level.

    You can have your doubts, but I have the bike in my stand and I measured the rear spacing. It is 197 mm.

    This is a decent frame, made in one of the Chinese factories that make millions of other bikes every year. Many of those frames have decals with other, assumed higher quality, brands.

    Kent is a very significant bicycle company, and recently started up US bicycle manufacturing. See Kent International Inc. - Manufacturing Today
    Being a bolt-on rear axle, it may measure 197 to you, but it is a 190 spec. 197 is a thru axle. There is no 197 qr/bolt on rear hub spacing. It is just sloppy tolerances.

    190qr/197 thru axle are the same width. The difference comes from how they are measured due to the differences between a qr and a thru axle. For all your claimed bike shop experience, you are awful naive.

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  32. #32
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    I recently bought a mid-level Fatboy. There are a number of things about it that are not to my liking (especially compared to my higher-end carbon MTB and gravel bike). So all I do is go out and have a blast on it! Do the same.

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    A fattie is a fattie. Fatties are FUN! Heavy fatties demand stronger riders and more stamina, that's all. Indistinct of what standard your rear-end fits into...

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    I was able to weigh stock tires and the new ones. And I found a lighter seat in the parts cabinet. Big weight reduction with these changes.

    More frame pictures also.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-weight-reduction.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-bottom-bracket-pedal.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-bottom-bracket.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-rear-dropouts.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-seat-top-tubes.jpg  


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    So how much did you pay to buy it including taxes?
    and with improvements what is your total out of pocket?

  36. #36
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    7 speed freewheels and the easy to bend axles on them should be illegal on adult bikes. A bike with a Cassette wheel is worth the extra coin IMO... Learn how to hammer your axle back into shape as finding a replacement is going to be difficult.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

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    8.6 pound loss is awfully (not "awful") great.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Being a bolt-on rear axle, it may measure 197 to you, but it is a 190 spec. 197 is a thru axle. There is no 197 qr/bolt on rear hub spacing. It is just sloppy tolerances.

    190qr/197 thru axle are the same width. The difference comes from how they are measured due to the differences between a qr and a thru axle.
    This statement piqued my interest since I'm new to Fat Bikes (hopefully I can get it out of the box, assemble and ride this weekend)...

    Anyway, These pictures seem to indicate there's the possibility of 190 and 197 OLDs in both QR and TA, so now I'm confused...

    Can you point me to any better link that explains this?

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    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    This statement piqued my interest since I'm new to Fat Bikes (hopefully I can get it out of the box, assemble and ride this weekend)...

    Anyway, These pictures seem to indicate there's the possibility of 190 and 197 OLDs in both QR and TA, so now I'm confused...

    Can you point me to any better link that explains this?

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    I guess there is no accounting for the chinese to do stupid $hit for no good reason.

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  40. #40
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    The Tsunami 4.9 weighs 1360 per tire. Are you going split tube? Don't forget to factor in Stan's or OrangeSeal weight.

    Still, a huge weight cut for that behemoth.
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  41. #41
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    Solely judging from the welds of the BB and rear drop outs from your pictures, those are not the welds from a experienced welder. the beads are very very thick, inconsistent and all over the place im afraid that this bike might not hold up well, looks like not up to par for offroad use. since you have already bought it. just enjoy it while you can. me personally would not have picked this bike to begin with nor spending any more money "updating" it. its the same as one of those type of situations like you have a 02 toyota prius, why would you wanna spend $500 to change out all your fluids and $400 to change the windshield. sure itd keep running but its an investment that you would never get back compare to if spending it to upgrade to another different car then instantly you have better features and resell value.
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    Iím pretty sure the Chinese CNC machine that made those welds has done hundreds of thousands of frames that haven't failed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Iím pretty sure the unskilled human that made those welds has done two or three frames that haven't failed.
    Fixed it for ya.

    I didn't wanna pile on here, but ya, those welds at the BB...yeesh. Make sure you've got your mouthguard in and seatbelt on at all times.

  44. #44
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    Yeah, and that color... and those decals... and that name....
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    OK, you guys are not very nice. I realize this isn't the greatest bike, and sure the OP didn't expect it to be the best bike ever, nor did he claim that. But let him ride and see and report how it all goes.
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    I was able to mount the tire tubeless on the front wheel using 2 layers of foam, stretch wrap, and 4 oz of Stans sealant. No leaks. These rims have a nice bead lock on them.

    The total weight of the front wheel with the Tsunami 4.9 folding bead 120 TPI tire, in as ridden condition, is 8 lbs (3.6 kg)

    Although I've searched, I have not been able to find any data on wheel with tire as ridden weight. How does this compare?

  47. #47
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    That's a respectable reduction for sure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Doom View Post
    7 speed freewheels and the easy to bend axles on them should be illegal on adult bikes. A bike with a Cassette wheel is worth the extra coin IMO... Learn how to hammer your axle back into shape as finding a replacement is going to be difficult.
    I've never bent an axle in all of the riding I have done since the early 70's.

    Neither has my wife or 3 kids. If they had, I would have known, as I am their bike mechanic.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    OK, you guys are not very nice. I realize this isn't the greatest bike, and sure the OP didn't expect it to be the best bike ever, nor did he claim that. But let him ride and see and report how it all goes.
    Ditto.

    Looking forward to a ride report... hopeful with a buddy with a more spendy bike for comparison!
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    I've never bent an axle in all of the riding I have done since the early 70's.

    Neither has my wife or 3 kids. If they had, I would have known, as I am their bike mechanic.
    When I worked in shops, I saw broken axles on freewheel hubs of cheap bikes with regularity.

    Not everyone who rides a bike with a freewheel hub is going to break an axle, but some people do. While I don't have a problem with this sort of hub on hybrids and cruisers and whatnot, they have no place on mtb's nowadays.

  51. #51
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    OP - While I don't agree with a lot of your reasoning, I encourage you to ride your bike and report back. Go have fun; don't fuss too much unless you need or want to.

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    Finished setting up the rear wheel tubeless. Set both tires at 10 PSI.

    No issue with chain clearance with the Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires.

    Went for a 3 mile ride on our snowy roads. Rides great, very controllable, no funny stuff. Feels light and accelerates quickly. Wheels and bottom bracket are smooth. Gearing is adequate for the terrain we have here, which includes some very steep, but short, hills due to our duneland terrain. Brakes are good.

    Cost work up is $500 total.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-origin8-tsunami-4.9.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-origin8-tsunami-4.9-chain-clearance.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-gmc-yukon-first-ride-1.jpg  


  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Finished setting up the rear wheel tubeless. Set both tires at 10 PSI.

    No issue with chain clearance with the Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 tires.

    Went for a 3 mile ride on our snowy roads. Rides great, very controllable, no funny stuff. Feels light and accelerates quickly. Wheels and bottom bracket are smooth. Gearing is adequate for the terrain we have here, which includes some very steep, but short, hills due to our duneland terrain. Brakes are good.

    Cost work up is $500 total.
    Kudos Paul!
    Just out of curiosity, have you weighted your bike in it's final state?

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    Thanks!

    My scale does not go over 30 lbs, so I was not able to weigh it. If my calculations are right, it should be 43.9 - 8.6 = 35.3 lbs.

    And virtually all of that is from changing the tires and setting them up tubeless.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Thanks!

    My scale does not go over 30 lbs, so I was not able to weigh it. If my calculations are right, it should be 43.9 - 8.6 = 35.3 lbs.

    And virtually all of that is from changing the tires and setting them up tubeless.
    Truly remarkable! If durability is half what could be expected it would be a very good bargain indeed.

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  56. #56
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    I plan to ride it like this and have fun. If anything fails, Iíll document it.

  57. #57
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    Nice work, Paul. Glad you are enjoying that beast.
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    Paul: when (and if) you want to add squish to your budget fatttie's front I believe you'd find a rare deal in this:
    https://lunacycle.com/luna-lander-fat-suspension-fork/
    Don't know if you have looked but it's hard to find non tapered head tube ones, and anything not really a pogo stick at that price.
    That way you can one-up the ante and say you've got a (very nice, by the way) front squish fattie for less than $700!
    No affiliation whatsoever, that's just my go to place to electrify fatties. Check it out, cause you have there a good electric platform potential.

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  59. #59
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    Pardon me for interjecting here, but ebikes and motorized bikes in general just don't sit well with my notions of what a bicycle oughta be. Get out and pedal. Get stronger, not craftier. And that fork's not really an upgrade, IMO.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Pardon me for interjecting here, but ebikes and motorized bikes in general just don't sit well with my notions of what a bicycle oughta be. Get out and pedal. Get stronger, not craftier. And that fork's not really an upgrade, IMO.
    Yeah, well and since you're interjecting, allow me to explain: I pedal my share like the rest, you know. Personally, I don't get the same from pedalling than from an e-bike but rather that I would like to believe that a nice fattie based e-bike is quite a car alternative, in some (if not all) circumstances. I think we ought to wake up and do our share for the environment before it's too late.

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  61. #61
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    You ebike in to work in the snow?

  62. #62
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    Not a bad bike but having a 24" version of this for my son (mongoose logan, exact same thing just smaller) your going to learn real fast how much that bottom bracket sucks. Not replaceable and going to play hell finding bearings.

    Also your weight calculations are off by about 8-10lbs. For my sons bike Ive built new wheels, put on carbon fiber bars, allow stem, seat post, shimano XT 9 speed, trailcraft craft set (shaved 1lbs just on the crank arms) tubeless etc. 1/2 of it I already had in parts bin, cranks I had to buy. As well as the hubs, rims, and spokes to build his wheels. I have maybe $400 invested. Couldnt justify buying a nice 24" fat bike for him cause he's not all that serious about riding.

    My 2011 Salsa Mukluk is 33lbs with rear rack and frame bag install, his weighs about 5-8lbs lbs more than mine (havent weighed his yet). Your on a 26" so I would be shocked if its under 40lbs yet.

    Nothing wrong with riding a cheap bike as long has you have no illusions about it and as long as you dont go upgrading it (just a giant waste of money, I know from experience).

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    It is clear he is a distributor trying to sell a shitty bike.
    He could have saved picking up an abandonned bike by the sidewalk and write
    FAT with a marker. Shit is shit. His life he can do as he pleases but do not believe all the lies coming from him.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    It is clear he is a distributor trying to sell a shitty bike.
    He could have saved picking up an abandonned bike by the sidewalk and write
    FAT with a marker. Shit is shit. His life he can do as he pleases but do not believe all the lies coming from him.
    If you are referring to me, I am not in the bicycle business at all, and not trying to sell anything.

    The only thing I have posted in this thread are facts.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    Paul: when (and if) you want to add squish to your budget fatttie's front I believe you'd find a rare deal in this:
    https://lunacycle.com/luna-lander-fat-suspension-fork/
    Don't know if you have looked but it's hard to find non tapered head tube ones, and anything not really a pogo stick at that price.
    That way you can one-up the ante and say you've got a (very nice, by the way) front squish fattie for less than $700!
    No affiliation whatsoever, that's just my go to place to electrify fatties. Check it out, cause you have there a good electric platform potential.

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  66. #66
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    I set up another one of these for my wife, this one has Origin8 Tsunami 4.0 120 TPI folding bead tires mounted tubeless.

    As pictured, hers is 33.8 lbs.

    These bikes have a lifetime frame and fork warranty.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-yukon-built-tsunami-4-tires.jpg  

    Last edited by Paul Fithian; 01-10-2018 at 12:03 PM.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post

    These bikes have a lifetime frame and fork warranty.
    It's this sentence right here that leads me to believe there is some truth to that distributor statement.


    Good on you for making the bike work for you. 33 pounds is pretty remarkable.

  68. #68
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    Paul: I crashed my fattie in the absolute boondocks of fat bikedom (Miami, FL) and had to resort to an Origin8 Tsunami 4.9 as I found the headquarters of their parent company is located here and consequently the LBS could get it sooner. How have you found them so far? Any bad habits? Self-steering, noisy?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kelbo View Post
    It's this sentence right here that leads me to believe there is some truth to that distributor statement.


    Good on you for making the bike work for you. 33 pounds is pretty remarkable.
    Thanks!

    But again, I am not in the bicycle business.

  70. #70
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    These are fun!

    Worked perfectly, ride great.

    Very satisfied with this setup.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-4.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-1.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-2.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-ride-3.jpg  


  71. #71
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    Not even a helmet riding on snow and ice.....

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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Not even a helmet riding on snow and ice.....
    You are right, and we talked about it afterwards. We always wear helmets on our road bikes.

    We will wear them from now on when riding fat.
    Yukon Truck
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  73. #73
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    I know people dont wear them for cruising around and such, but ya, snow and ice is one of those "asking to get hurt" moments. Just looking out.

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  74. #74
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    Chain clearances in first gear with 4" and 4.9" tires.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Chain clearances in first gear with 4" and 4.9" tires.
    You know, I gather, that those Tsunamis aren't really 4.9's, do you? I have a copy mounted on 100 mm (4 inch) rims and they're actually closer to 4.6, a bit less perhaps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    You know, I gather, that those Tsunamis aren't really 4.9's, do you?
    Paul, how about putting a calipers on the Tsunamis at their widest point?

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    OP I'm glad you could piss off so many people on this forum with your thread! Bunch of whiny pissers on here telling you what to do with your money.

    Now here's what you should do with your money:

    If you every want more climbing power I like the Vulta 22/32/42 square tapered crank arm set (the 42T is removable). It's like $20 on amazon and that plus a cupset will be all you need to kkeep that BB riding smooth and for the most part moisture free.

    Also for the freewheel, the 8 speed sunrace 13-34 8 speed freewheel is a nice replacement with equal gears leading up to a nice granny first gear.

    Hit up one of the mongoose thread for what look to be a lot of interchangeable parts and less doubters.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bimmer74 View Post
    Paul, how about putting a calipers on the Tsunamis at their widest point?
    At 5 PSI, 35 Degrees F, I get the following:

    Tsunami 4: Tread - 3.5" / Sidewall - 4.3"

    Tsunami 4.9: Tread - 4.1" / Sidewall - 5"
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  79. #79
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    More fun
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-moon-valley-jan-2018.jpg  

    Yukon Truck
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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    At 5 PSI, 35 Degrees F, I get the following:

    Tsunami 4: Tread - 3.5" / Sidewall - 4.3"

    Tsunami 4.9: Tread - 4.1" / Sidewall - 5"

    Many thanks... This is very helpful.

    Is there some database/spreadsheet of fatbike tire sizes (claimed and actual)?

  81. #81
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    Used a shop vise and measuring tape (can't find a large enough caliper). My tubeless Tsunami 4.9, sidewall to sidewall, reads 4 11/16" (4.6875 inches) on 100 mm (outer) rims @ 17 psi.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by hectorlandaeta View Post
    Used a shop vise and measuring tape (can't find a large enough caliper). My tubeless Tsunami 4.9, sidewall to sidewall, reads 4 11/16" (4.6875 inches) on 100 mm (outer) rims @ 17 psi.
    That's probably pretty close. VERY few tires are wider than advertised.
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  84. #84
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    I've discovered a problem setting up this rim/tire combo at less than 10 PSI, both tubeless and with tubes. See Tubeless Low Pressure Issue for more info.
    Yukon Truck
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  85. #85
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    If you aren't running rims and tires that are solid candidates for tubeless, it's better to play Ockham and use tubes.

    Ride more, fuss about less that way.
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  86. #86
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    That other thread says that your problem is at under 5 PSI (five!).

    Am I missing something, or is that really extremely low? It seems obvious that's not enough pressure to keep the bead on the rim...

    The XC guys say that anything less than 8-10 PSI will result in burping and flats.

  87. #87
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    Tubeless fat bikes can be run much lower-assuming the rims and tires are suitable. 1.5-2 psi is not unusual in certain conditions.
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  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    When I worked in shops, I saw broken axles on freewheel hubs of cheap bikes with regularity.

    Not everyone who rides a bike with a freewheel hub is going to break an axle, but some people do. While I don't have a problem with this sort of hub on hybrids and cruisers and whatnot, they have no place on mtb's nowadays.
    The narrower the spacing the more likely you are to bend the axle with a freewheel hub. Most "cheap bikes" seen in bike stores with freewheels are doing it with 126-135mm dropout spacing hubs. A freewheel on a fat bike hub that's 170 or 190mm spacing has a lot more axle supported between the actual bearings than is on a 135mm cassette hub on a regular mountain bike.
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    Actually not.

    Actuallt there is all that extra, unsupported axle between the bearings. And thats where I have seen them bend/break. Still the exact same spacing between drop out and bearings regardless of rear spacing.

    The problem isnt the axle design (solid threaded), its the cheap metal used and the crappy spacers allowing too much flex.

    First bike I had when I got back into ride was a walmart bike. I was A LOT heavier than I am now and didnt take long before I broke it. Replaced it with a quality hollow axle for QR skewer and never had a problem.

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  90. #90
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    Hey Paul, glad to see you enjoying your bike

    Fat bikes are good fun and ideal for your location.

    Just have fun and enjoy your current ride.

    If you succumb to "upgraditis" at some point in the future; you can get a whole lot more for your money with 'preloved' frames/forks/bikes etc.

    Kind regards,

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  91. #91
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    Cool-blue Rhythm This has been entertaining !

    I've had some good fun reading through all the exchanges here but I have to say, Paul stuck with a plan like glue, seemed to do everything he set out to accomplish, has a bike (or two?) that he's happy with and did all this while (in the most respectful and polite manor) crushing the naysayers !!
    Golden f'n Globe worthy - Sincere thanks.

    Nice looking bike.
    That color puts many to shame when looking at some of the other 'contenders' other posters were excited about in the lower end price ranges.
    I do understand there are valid points on how others spend their time and money and that personal agenda takes over pretty quick as "helpful advice" but as you say, you already purchased it and you have the professional background in bike mechanics and service.
    Since nothing you've posted sounds like you'll rocket off the first 6' drop you find, I can see that bike will probably fit your expectations just fine based on what you posted per trails and beaches in your area.

    I think of numerous posts about big money, big name bikes that have had defects or flaws and the runaround that sometimes happens; Grief-stricken owners fired up or left hanging and then, just your mention of the manufacturer warranty sets off a rapid-fire conspiracy theory that you are a company plant ... by K E N T !!
    I congratulate your project but just as much for the sit-com you have fed some of our "writers". mtbr Has Talent !!

    btw - I was looking for bike info from China well before I found this topic and happened into this article. Bike manufacturing in the U.S. Kent / Walmart-

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.for...o-the-u-s/amp/
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  92. #92
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    That article is 18 months old, and, I think, this is one of the key take aways from the interview:

    As I told you, all the parts are imported. Iím struggling to make the parts in the United States. I came up with the idea to host a summit at our factory, and we invited over 30 companies in China and Taiwan with the idea of opening additional factories down here, and Governor Haley gave a speech to them. So far it has not clicked.

    Given Walmart's recent struggles in the market overall, and the low cost of Taiwanese manufacture, along with Asian attitudes toward such a shift of production, such a venture, while laudable, doesn't seem to be likely to change much.
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    Thanks for the positive comments guys!

    I have ridden it quite a bit, taken a few tumbles, including a complete header when the front wheel punched through the ice and dropped a few inches into the sand below. No damage or injury, just laughter. All components work as intended. All fun.

    The tire/rim combo I've set up won't run tubed or tubeless below 10 PSI. See the other thread I started on this subject. Changing to the stock tubes to Q-Tubes Superlight 26" x 2.4 - 2.75" - 4" Presta saves over a pound per wheel.
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  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelbo View Post
    It's this sentence right here that leads me to believe there is some truth to that distributor statement.


    Good on you for making the bike work for you. 33 pounds is pretty remarkable.
    You're not very bright are you ? Many new owners of any bike will brag about their brand offering a lifetime warranty on the frame. Has nothing at all about whether they work for the bicycle industry.
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  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    Given Walmart's recent struggles in the market overall, and the low cost of Taiwanese manufacture, along with Asian attitudes toward such a shift of production, such a venture, while laudable, doesn't seem to be likely to change much.

    Actually THIS bit of the interview is more relevant...

    Feldman: How do manufacturing costs compare to China or Taiwan?

    Kamler: The cost is still less in China, not in Taiwan but in China, than the United States. But there are import savings by bringing in parts, and the savings on ocean freight is substantial. My costs are still about 5% higher. But I see that diminishing over the years. Itís no secret that labor costs in China are going up 10% or 15% a year, and people in China donít want to work for factories anymore.


    Compared to bicycles assembled in Taiwan, Kent assembling in the USA isn't anymore costly to do. And just as car and aircraft manufacturers setup assembly plants in the USA (or Canada) to assemble the final vehicle using parts imported from other countries to get around particular import duties/taxes on those final products... there are bicycle manufacturers that are seeking do this also. Taiwan is no longer a "low cost" to manufacture asian source country for the bicycle world and hasn't been for many years now.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Fithian View Post
    Thanks for the positive comments guys!

    I have ridden it quite a bit, taken a few tumbles, including a complete header when the front wheel punched through the ice and dropped a few inches into the sand below. No damage or injury, just laughter. All components work as intended. All fun.

    The tire/rim combo I've set up won't run tubed or tubeless below 10 PSI. See the other thread I started on this subject. Changing to the stock tubes to Q-Tubes Superlight 26" x 2.4 - 2.75" - 4" Presta saves over a pound per wheel.
    It amuses me greatly the people who poo'ed on your choice of a Kent, when there are dozens of pages about the Mongoose Dolomite, Giant manufactured fats from Momentum and Northrock, and other similar fats of people putting up their upgraded
    discount bikes. Kent like others simply spec'ed whatever lowest cost components they needed to, in order to hit the target retail price point. At least compared to the "new costco low" of the Northrock XC00, your Kent has decent width rims for more tire support and actual tread being put to the snow/sand. The XC00 has 57mm outside width rims, so whatever is mounted, inflates to much narrower than they would on an 80mm or 100mm rim. But those rims were chosen pretty much because they were a lot lighter as well. That's why stock, with the kickstand the XC00 is just under 36 pounds.

    As to your issue with the tires/rims not wanting to be run under 10psi. Are you SURE your gauge is reading the tire pressure properly ? Even a loose fitting fat tire that won't setup tubeless should hold on the rim at 5psi with tubes. Beto, Topeak, Schwalbe and others offer digital pressure gauges which will properly read down to 0.1 psi.
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  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight View Post
    Actually THIS bit of the interview is more relevant...

    Feldman: How do manufacturing costs compare to China or Taiwan?

    Kamler: The cost is still less in China, not in Taiwan but in China, than the United States. But there are import savings by bringing in parts, and the savings on ocean freight is substantial. My costs are still about 5% higher. But I see that diminishing over the years. Itís no secret that labor costs in China are going up 10% or 15% a year, and people in China donít want to work for factories anymore.


    Compared to bicycles assembled in Taiwan, Kent assembling in the USA isn't anymore costly to do. And just as car and aircraft manufacturers setup assembly plants in the USA (or Canada) to assemble the final vehicle using parts imported from other countries to get around particular import duties/taxes on those final products... there are bicycle manufacturers that are seeking do this also. Taiwan is no longer a "low cost" to manufacture asian source country for the bicycle world and hasn't been for many years now.
    I think I was accurate. Has Kent switched all assembly over to the U.S.? No. Have Taiwan or China begun investing heavily in bicycle assembly in the U.S.? Unknown as a sum total, but I bet no.

    Of the approximately 3,200,000 bicycles Kent sells, 2.7 million are imported in "assembled" state from Asia.

    Bicycle Production Begins Move Back to US | Reshoring | IndustryWeek
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  98. #98
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    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-bike-bunker-c-oc-sheriffs-dept.jpg\
    So I have an opportunity to purchase a GMC Denali road bike from a local police auction from when they cleaned out a homeless camp. I will need new chain, shifters, cables, seat and wheels. I'm looking forward to this build. I love Chevys but this is going to be my first PRO-Grade GMC. Buy American #MAGA
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  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHun View Post
    That article is 18 months old, and, I think, this is one of the key take aways from the interview:

    As I told you, all the parts are imported. Iím struggling to make the parts in the United States. I came up with the idea to host a summit at our factory, and we invited over 30 companies in China and Taiwan with the idea of opening additional factories down here, and Governor Haley gave a speech to them. So far it has not clicked.

    Given Walmart's recent struggles in the market overall, and the low cost of Taiwanese manufacture, along with Asian attitudes toward such a shift of production, such a venture, while laudable, doesn't seem to be likely to change much.
    Yes, 18 months is probably enough time to see what direction things are headed although owner Kamler sounded pretty transparent as you mention, on the challenges related to homegrown versus sourcing parts/components.
    It was interesting to hear his goals toward the paint quality and finish on the bikes and definitely sounding like a win for SC where they have their newer factory, added employment opportunities and starting pay almost $4.00 / hr over their min wage.

    I won't cross-post but to mention I bumped into that story by accident hunting some China sourced bike info related to taking your suitcase of money to China to put your own name on a line of bikes.
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  100. #100
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    Fun continues.

    Biggest complaint so far is that these rims will not hold the tire bead in place below 10 PSI.

    Lower pressure would be better in this sandy terrain.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-moon-valley-jan-2018-2.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-moon-valley-jan-2018-3.jpg  

    GMC Yukon - Kent 52618-moon-valley-jan-2018-4.jpg  

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