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  1. #401
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    Went out for a ride on Sunday did a full lap at the local trail. The temperature was about zero degrees and the trail was hardpacked. The bike handles very well and the tires grip in these contditions. I was able to make it up all the hills because the bike has so much grip!

    So glad I went with the Framed MN 3.0. This bike enables me to ride in the winter!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-framed_mn_3.0_gamehaven_5.jpg  


  2. #402
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    I've got an Alaskan Alloy w/ Bluto ordered and I was wondering if anyone has successfully setup the stock wheelset tubeless (Maxxis Mammoths)? It looks like the Alaskan and Minnesota come with the same wheels. I was thinking about trying the method described here:

    Tubeless Fatbike Conversion Update | Cycles In Life

  3. #403
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    I was out riding last Sunday morning. We had 2 degrees and -15 wind chills here and lots of snow and ice. Managed to do 8.2 miles on wide track. Today morning it was much warmer at 22 and I did only about 4 miles on single track but there was way too much ice. Some sections I had no choice but walk the bike.

    NEED STUDS!!!

    So now looking to make my own or just buy ready made.

    I was going to get VEE Snowshoe 4.5 and install my own studs.

    Grip Studs 150 pack is $140 and I think I would need about 120 studs per tire + the tool + a set of tires.

    Its more economical to buy the ready made XL at $335 a set. Assuming the XL will fit.

    Snowshoe XL | VEE Tire Co.

    Anyone fitted the VEE Studded Snowshoe XL which is 4.8 wide?
    I have the Dillinger 5 on the rear, which is also 4.8", so it shouldn't be a problem to run the Snowshoe XL.


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  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam A View Post
    I have the Dillinger 5 on the rear, which is also 4.8", so it shouldn't be a problem to run the Snowshoe XL.


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    I hope, I just ordered two of the studded XL's ))

  5. #405
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    thats good info, thanks

    thats the same crankset I found, SRAM X5 Fat Bike GXP100

    SRAM X5 Fat Bike GXP100 Crankset 2014 > Components > Drivetrain > Cranksets | Jenson USA

    I'm 5'7" and use 165mm crank arms and have the small frame. This would give me more clearance against the chainstay then your 175mm. Although not sure if they make 165 in that model. All I found so far is 170 and 175mm.

    Would you be able to take pics of the crank arm clearance?

    I also do not have the Crank Puller tool (my Ibis uses BB92 press fit BB) so thats another ~$10-15
    So yall are using a 100mm bb on these? My 3.0 is and 83mm shell, right? They come with the appropriate spacers?

  6. #406
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    I did not upgrade yet, I'm quite sure that 3.0 is 100mm bb like other fat bikes.

    Just checked the website

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 Fat Bike 2015

    Bottom Bracket: 100mm Sealed

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADKMTNBIKER View Post
    awesome job. and great post. very detailed. thank you.
    I have now put 240km on the FM3.0 with the studded tires I made, using the stainless self-drilling screws and the stock h-billies that came with the bike. No flats, no air leaks. AMAZING traction!!!. 2-4" of snow with ice underneath is no problem at all. You can stop quickly and also start on ice without any issues. Turning is also no problem at all.....just make sure to stud the outter treads like in the picture I posted...and space the spikes every 3-4 treads. I tripled up the outside pattern, from the one I posted previously. And remember not to stud the center 2" of the tires. Tire pressure at 8 lbs back and 8.5 lbs pressure up front. If you guys can handle making your own studded tires, and set aside about 4 hrs to do it right, you can save $250 by not using grip studs and $400-500 by not buying dillingers. Total investment is about $35.

    I have been riding in -20c temps that end up around -35c with wind chill. The special weather-proof silicon sealant has held up fine. The brakes fail to work after a while at those temps because everything starts to get a thin layer of ice on it....but the studded tires work perfectly fine.

    In the spring, just buy new tires, and you still come out paying $150 tops......and you then have a set of summer tires and a set of winter studded tires too.

  8. #408
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    Studded H-billies spike pattern

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-img_0580.jpg

    that pattern will result in about 150 spikes per tire.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-img_8030.jpg  

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-img_8033.jpg  


  9. #409
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    Thanks for posting the update. Yes, this is the lowest cost option to go and factoring in a set of tires and screws you are looking at around a $100 cost plus some rather simple labor. I have about a quarter of a mile to ride on asphalt from my garage to the edge of the forest and the trail system. I'm also about 8 min away by car to the rest of the single track on the other side of the forest. My concern is the screws holding up against asphalt riding and not sure how many times I could replace them with out damaging the tires. I looked at options and while I might still build a set, I decided to try the Snowshoe XL at $330 shipped with the 240 carbide-tip studs per tire. Besides the large number of carbide tips you also get excellent tire for ~$230 more. Only hope these will fit

  10. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    Thanks for posting the update. Yes, this is the lowest cost option to go and factoring in a set of tires and screws you are looking at around a $100 cost plus some rather simple labor. I have about a quarter of a mile to ride on asphalt from my garage to the edge of the forest and the trail system. I'm also about 8 min away by car to the rest of the single track on the other side of the forest. My concern is the screws holding up against asphalt riding and not sure how many times I could replace them with out damaging the tires. I looked at options and while I might still build a set, I decided to try the Snowshoe XL at $330 shipped with the 240 carbide-tip studs per tire. Besides the large number of carbide tips you also get excellent tire for ~$230 more. Only hope these will fit
    Hi - what you might run into, looking at the Snowshoe XL tread pattern (which I uploaded below), is that they put spikes right in the center of the tread pattern. This will affect handling on pavement, and make it harder to control the bike, both acceleration and turning. By putting spikes on the centerline, you take away a good portion of the rubber contact patch. Carbide tips and 410 stainless self drilling screws are both durable. On the Vee Rubber site, the Snowshoe XL's MSRP out at $110... so not sure why they cost you $330. The XXXXX pattern on the tire wall itself might help shed ice off the tire as the slush freezes up on them in really cold temps... not sure. For me, the thing that ultimately stops you after a couple of hours of riding on the really cold days (below -15c), is the contact ice build up on the tires. You have to get a stick and knock it all out of the tires treads, to keep riding. Plus, you can tell the bike gets noticeably heavier. When it's not as cold, the tires shed the slush and snow quite easily.



    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-snowshoexl_stud_resize-700x500.jpg

  11. #411
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    34.9

    edit:

    sorry, misread my scribbled notes, seat post is 30.9, seat clamp is 34.9
    Just an FYI. I ordered a KS Eten dropper, 30.9mm. It was to small, when I pulled the post out and looked.. it is a 31.6. I should have checked before I order.
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  12. #412
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    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    Hi - what you might run into, looking at the Snowshoe XL tread pattern (which I uploaded below), is that they put spikes right in the center of the tread pattern. This will affect handling on pavement, and make it harder to control the bike, both acceleration and turning. By putting spikes on the centerline, you take away a good portion of the rubber contact patch. Carbide tips and 410 stainless self drilling screws are both durable.
    I would hope that a tire manufacturer put some thought in to it and actually tested varies designs before committing to production Note that 45NORTH Dillinger also has studs in similar pattern. Also the studs are sticking out quite a bit less then the screws in your picture therefore there will be more rubber contact with the studs. They only stick out about a millimeter.


    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    On the Vee Rubber site, the Snowshoe XL's MSRP out at $110... so not sure why they cost you $330
    All studded tires are sold out everywhere and now sell at a premium. You will have a hard time finding these at $330


    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    The XXXXX pattern on the tire wall itself might help shed ice off the tire as the slush freezes up on them in really cold temps... not sure. For me, the thing that ultimately stops you after a couple of hours of riding on the really cold days (below -15c), is the contact ice build up on the tires. You have to get a stick and knock it all out of the tires treads, to keep riding. Plus, you can tell the bike gets noticeably heavier. When it's not as cold, the tires shed the slush and snow quite easily.
    I have not had the same issue with the ice build up, perhaps I did not experience same conditions.

    Another thing to consider is that you are also talking about 4.8 size verses 4.25 so thats also an improvement. Not to say your way is bad but there are advantages and disadvantages both ways. For me personally ~$200 price deference was not that much of an issue considering these are ready made, larger size and specifically snow tires.

    I will pot some pics and details, they look awesome but there are some issues with fit which I resolved.

  13. #413
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    These tires are massive, quite a bit beefier then the H-Billie's. They are also more true to the 4.8 size then other so called 4.8 tires. Getting them on the rims was quite easy although I should have pulled out the compressor instead of using the floor pump

    I pumped them up to 30psi, bounced a bit to seat the tires and dropped to 10psi. The fit is a bit tight but not that bad. The issue comes in with the bottom part of the chain rubbing against the tire. Now this only happens when you shift to the smaller chainring (28T) on the front and largest sprocket (32T) on the rear. Shifting the front to the 38T fixes the issue. This forced me to finally replace the chainring to 34T which was on my list all along. With the 34T on front and 32T on rear the chain is close but still ok. I was also planning to replace the cassette to 11-36 which should also be fine as well. This could definitely be an issue with some climbs for some riders. I tend to almost always stay in 34T on the front and shift only the rear. I also dropped the pressure down to 7psi and that also helped a little bit. I normally ride between 6-7psi in the snow.

    Can't wait for the weekend to take it out on the trails!

    This is 28T on front and 32T on rear, you can see the chain touching the tire on the bottom

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_182233-large-.jpg

    Here its in 34T front and 32T rear, you can see the chain clearance no longer an issue with this gearing

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_182253-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_182548-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_182606-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_182643-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_190543-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_190707-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_201055-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_201108-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150225_201137-large-.jpg

    I will do some measurements as to the true width of the tire on these 80mm rims at varies PSI.
    Last edited by dariusf; 03-01-2015 at 12:44 PM.

  14. #414
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    Also if I run in to issues with the rear getting clogged up a bit due to snow / ice accumulating on the tire, I will try 45NRTH Dillinger 26x4.0 on the rear and keep the Vee Snowshoe XL on the front.

  15. #415
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    Dillinger 5 will also fit on the rear. I don't have a problem with chain rub.


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  16. #416
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam A View Post
    Dillinger 5 will also fit on the rear. I don't have a problem with chain rub.
    yes, based on the reading I did I think the Dillinger 5 (4.8) is actually quite a bit smaller. Would you be able to do some measurements of the tire on the rim at 10 and 7psi? I will do the same.

    Thanks

  17. #417
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    What is the best way to measure a tire? Are you looking for max casing width or max knob width?


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  18. #418
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Javorsky View Post
    Just an FYI. I ordered a KS Eten dropper, 30.9mm. It was to small, when I pulled the post out and looked.. it is a 31.6. I should have checked before I order.
    Say wha..?
    It's definitely not a 30.9?

  19. #419
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    Looks like at 7psi the diameter is 29.5 and width is 115mm

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-diameter.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-width.jpg

  20. #420
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippertheripper View Post
    Say wha..?
    It's definitely not a 30.9?
    Correct. Mine is for sure 31.6. Says so on the seat post. I looked at frameds site and it does not say what size it is. My friend has a 1.0 and the site shows it is 30.6.
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  21. #421
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    I really like obese bikes, specially the Minnesota ones.
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  22. #422
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcasso87 View Post
    I really like obese bikes, specially the Minnesota ones.
    Here are couple pics from today with the Vee Snowshoe XL 4.8 studded tires, its as obese as you can go on this frame

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150301_104446_resized-large-.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-20150301_104458_resized-large-.jpg

  23. #423
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    These tires are awesome, super nice and fat, great handling on the snow and the studs add that grip needed on the ice. Slight issues with this setup, in the hilly and twisty single track here the 34T was a bit too much for the front with all the snow and ice. Dropping the front to 28T provided much better gearing but then the highest I could go in the rear without the bottom chain rubbing the tire was 28T which was not cutting it in some situations leaving me wanting to shift more.

    I do not have any smaller chainrings laying around but I think I will switch out the 34T with 32T from my summer bike or even buy 30T.

    I also think I will change the cassette to 11-36T which will definitely help even more.

    So now with 28T on front and 11-32 the lowest gear ratio I can get is 1 using 28T front 28T rear with out the chain rubbing the tire. If I switch my existing 34T on the front to 30T and change the cassette to 11-36, the lowest gear ratio I can get with out the chain issue is 0.8 using 30T front and 36T rear. This would allow me to keep the front on the larger 30T ring and be able to use the full 11-36 range in the rear.

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork & Rigid Fork-gear_ratios.png

  24. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    Hi - what you might run into, looking at the Snowshoe XL tread pattern (which I uploaded below), is that they put spikes right in the center of the tread pattern. This will affect handling on pavement, and make it harder to control the bike, both acceleration and turning. By putting spikes on the centerline, you take away a good portion of the rubber contact patch. Carbide tips and 410 stainless self drilling screws are both durable. On the Vee Rubber site, the Snowshoe XL's MSRP out at $110... so not sure why they cost you $330. The XXXXX pattern on the tire wall itself might help shed ice off the tire as the slush freezes up on them in really cold temps... not sure. For me, the thing that ultimately stops you after a couple of hours of riding on the really cold days (below -15c), is the contact ice build up on the tires. You have to get a stick and knock it all out of the tires treads, to keep riding. Plus, you can tell the bike gets noticeably heavier. When it's not as cold, the tires shed the slush and snow quite easily.



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	SnowshoeXL_Stud_resize-700x500.jpg 
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    AliG, I took your advice and made studded tires in a similar pattern to yours. The front has 180 spikes and the rear has 160 spikes, both different patterns. I modified them over a few weeks and 80 miles of riding, while I rode over different terrain to sample the differences all around.

    The front tire is very similar to the pattern you posted. The rear tire is similar to the Snowshoe XL pattern, but the spikes are farther from the centerline, than that manufacturer used.

    I found out that when the spikes do stick out a bit more than the standard studs found on the other tires, that you get superior traction when climbing steeper inclines that can get icy, such as the trails I ride on that are shared with cross-country skiers. The trails are groomed, but on each of the steep climbs, their skis make the ice surface very slick when they "snowplow" down the hills in that "V" shape to slow themselves down.

    There were two other fat bikes there, using studded tires. One bike was a specialized using their branded studded tire and he did ok, as long as he was down around 4 lbs pressure. The other bike was a Motobecane boris/KHS (same bike) and he fell a few times using their snowshoe tires.

    I had the front at 7 lbs and rear at 6.5 lbs and was perfectly fine. Tire displaced out to 4.7 inches at that pressure and my weight on the bike, sitting whille climbing to get the most weight over the rear wheel.

    Overall, your studded screw mod kicked ass over both their tires from the manufacturers.

    I had zero snow build up on the trails. I did have to deal with slush and ice build up as soon as I hit the road that went back to our vehicles. It had been salted and sanded, and that's when the tires started to clog up. But for the 25km circuits in the backwoods, zero issues. (rear and front tires)

    therefore at 6.5 lbs pressure rear tire displaces to 4.7" wide, and provides all the snow and ice traction I need. >>No chain rub at all<<, and also using the SRAM X5 upgraded cranks you posted earlier. 22t inner gear and 36t tallest gear.
    thanks again!

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-rear-tire.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-front-tire.jpg

  25. #425
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    Just pulled the trigger and ordered the Framed Mini-sota for the kids I guess I will have to consider DYI and use the screws to get some studs on those 24" x 4" bad boys
    Last edited by dariusf; 03-09-2015 at 05:00 AM.

  26. #426
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    Tire Spikes

    The homemade studded or (more like) spiked tires have served me well all winter, especially now during the spring thaw and refreezing process. The bike stays in complete control on accents and descents over snow, ice and rocks. You should be able to see the spike pattern in the enclosed picture...and one added benefit is they have a nice "crunching" sound as speed increases...people definitely hear you approaching on the icy trails.

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_0836ice.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_0712x.jpg
    Last edited by aliG; 03-15-2015 at 09:46 PM.

  27. #427
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    Fat Bike Noob and roadie convert here. Well still a roadie, but now a huge fat bike fan as well! Purchased the 3.0 xwt with rigid fork late December and have kept it stock until now. However now looking to do some upgrades. Looked through all 18 pages in this thread but some of the upgrades seemed over my head, again Noob. Sorry in advance if these have been covered.

    Looking for new wheels where I can run a 3 inch or so tire (tubeless) that works well with the stock fork and possibly bluto (when I get around to purchasing). Also looking for some reasonably priced upgrades to the stock handlebars... looking for wider and a bit lighter. Any other 3.0xwt specific easy(ish) DIY mods to save some weight, or relatively inexpensive upgrades to consider for this bike?

    Cheers and thanks in advance. Looking forward to learning and becoming a part of the community.

  28. #428
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    If you are on FB, there is also a very active Framed fatbike group including Minnesota 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 & Alaska (both Al & Carbon).

  29. #429
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    Quote Originally Posted by oshburg View Post
    Fat Bike Noob and roadie convert here. Well still a roadie, but now a huge fat bike fan as well! Purchased the 3.0 xwt with rigid fork late December and have kept it stock until now. However now looking to do some upgrades. Looked through all 18 pages in this thread but some of the upgrades seemed over my head, again Noob. Sorry in advance if these have been covered.

    Looking for new wheels where I can run a 3 inch or so tire (tubeless) that works well with the stock fork and possibly bluto (when I get around to purchasing). Also looking for some reasonably priced upgrades to the stock handlebars... looking for wider and a bit lighter. Any other 3.0xwt specific easy(ish) DIY mods to save some weight, or relatively inexpensive upgrades to consider for this bike?

    Cheers and thanks in advance. Looking forward to learning and becoming a part of the community.
    Welcome to the Framed / fat bike family I would personally start with 'comfort' upgrades. Get a confy seat, this is personal preference but the WTB V Pure line of seats have great overall reviews as far as comfort. I have them on all my bikes.

    WTB Pure V Race Saddle - BlueSkyCycling.com

    I also changed grips for nicer ones.

    Then you can go for handlebars, I like carbon fiber as it saves weight but more importantly improves the feel of the bike. I got a raised one from ebay for ~$60. As far as going wider, well consider that going fast over a twisty single track, the last thing you want is hit a tree with the bar end. Too narrow is not good as well but do not go very wide or you are asking for nasty crash.

    Pedals is another quick upgrade.

    You can go with carbon seat post but its $$$ and not that huge weight saving.

    Wheels is a big upgrade and you have to match axle style and size so a bit of a pain. Proper wheels that will work tubeless will save you the most weight if you loose the tubes. The hubs used can make a huge upgrade but can be costly. Not sure on the price deference with fat bike rims but a good set of custom build wheels with good hubs (hope, I9, hadley) will run you $800-1200 for a set. Thats a whole other huge topic.

    Power train, this costs a bit as well, I would start changing the cassette to 11-36, get Shimano XT as the hubs are alloy and anything lower will damage them. I just ordered 2 of them from ebay 10 min ago.

    Shimano XT Dyna Sys CS M771 10 Speed Mountain Bike Cassette 11 36 New MTB | eBay

    You might want to get SLX chain as well, I just ordered one,

    New in Box 2015 Shimano SLX CN HG75 10 Speed 116 Link HG Chain w Pin | eBay

    Derailleurs and shifters I would say are more 'optional' upgrades as its costly and take effort to matchup.

    Brakes, this is big for me, I want good brakes that work well, I love Shimano XT brakes (SLX is almost same at a few $ less). Good set of hydraulic brakes blows away the mechanical ones. I upgraded by for $150 new set on ebay, + XT rotors 180 front, 160 rear.

    Crank / bottom bracket, thats ~ $150 and I decided to not upgrade at this time, I did change my chain ring, removed the outer guard and replaced the large chaining with Race Face 30T (you will need new bolts).

    Tires, if you ride in snow with ice, then get extra set of tires and do the DYI screw conversion as other did here or get a nice set of studded snow tires. I paid $330 for Vee Snowshoe XL 3.8" with studs. Its pricey but medical bills are more

    Have fun with upgrades

  30. #430
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    If you are on FB, there is also a very active Framed fatbike group including Minnesota 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 & Alaska (both Al & Carbon).
    Thanks a lot! Joined last night!


    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    Welcome to the Framed / fat bike family I would personally start with 'comfort' upgrades. Get a confy seat, this is personal preference but the WTB V Pure line of seats have great overall reviews as far as comfort. I have them on all my bikes.

    WTB Pure V Race Saddle - BlueSkyCycling.com

    I also changed grips for nicer ones.

    Then you can go for handlebars, I like carbon fiber as it saves weight but more importantly improves the feel of the bike. I got a raised one from ebay for ~$60. As far as going wider, well consider that going fast over a twisty single track, the last thing you want is hit a tree with the bar end. Too narrow is not good as well but do not go very wide or you are asking for nasty crash.

    Pedals is another quick upgrade.

    You can go with carbon seat post but its $$$ and not that huge weight saving.

    Wheels is a big upgrade and you have to match axle style and size so a bit of a pain. Proper wheels that will work tubeless will save you the most weight if you loose the tubes. The hubs used can make a huge upgrade but can be costly. Not sure on the price deference with fat bike rims but a good set of custom build wheels with good hubs (hope, I9, hadley) will run you $800-1200 for a set. Thats a whole other huge topic.

    Power train, this costs a bit as well, I would start changing the cassette to 11-36, get Shimano XT as the hubs are alloy and anything lower will damage them. I just ordered 2 of them from ebay 10 min ago.

    Shimano XT Dyna Sys CS M771 10 Speed Mountain Bike Cassette 11 36 New MTB | eBay

    You might want to get SLX chain as well, I just ordered one,

    New in Box 2015 Shimano SLX CN HG75 10 Speed 116 Link HG Chain w Pin | eBay

    Derailleurs and shifters I would say are more 'optional' upgrades as its costly and take effort to matchup.

    Brakes, this is big for me, I want good brakes that work well, I love Shimano XT brakes (SLX is almost same at a few $ less). Good set of hydraulic brakes blows away the mechanical ones. I upgraded by for $150 new set on ebay, + XT rotors 180 front, 160 rear.

    Crank / bottom bracket, thats ~ $150 and I decided to not upgrade at this time, I did change my chain ring, removed the outer guard and replaced the large chaining with Race Face 30T (you will need new bolts).

    Tires, if you ride in snow with ice, then get extra set of tires and do the DYI screw conversion as other did here or get a nice set of studded snow tires. I paid $330 for Vee Snowshoe XL 3.8" with studs. Its pricey but medical bills are more

    Have fun with upgrades
    Thanks for the warm welcome! Was a little worried about asking the NOOB questions...

    Handlebars/grips seem like the easiest upgrade. I just want a bit wider as I feel too tight.

    Wheels - seems like there is tons of options just like there were for Road.... for now thinking of just getting something to do 29+ for the summer. Looked into fattie slims but those don't look like they will work (hubs don't look like they match). You know of any other options to go 29+ that work well with the 3.0 xwt without breaking the bank?

    Brakes - you have the link for that setup you used?

    I felt myself wanted extra grip when riding on snow/ice. Studded snow tires seem like the way to go!

    What's the benefit of the chain upgrade?

  31. #431
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    Bikesdirect has a 29" wheelset that for 190QR rear 150 bluto front for $250

  32. #432
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcracer2 View Post
    Bikesdirect has a 29" wheelset that for 190QR rear 150 bluto front for $250
    Would that work with stock fork too? Would assume so, but would rather ask than assume?

    Bluto is a down the road purchase...

  33. #433
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    I want to check if anyone has experienced similar issue with their Framed Minnesota 3.0 that might explain what Iím facing.

    I purchases a 2015 3.0 model in October/December and for the most part had no issues. After about a month I started to experience a loud knocking sound, metal against metal. Itís not all the time but maybe a few times a min and its random and happens when I put pressure on the cranks but not all the time. I canít isolate it but itís coming from the cranks / BB/ or rear hub. The chain tension looks good and everything looks tight and to spec. Iím not able to reproduce with the bike on the bike stand.

    Hopefully this is something someone might have experienced and might have some ideas.

    Thanks

  34. #434
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    Latest upgrade

    Shimano XT 11-36 cassette
    24" Mini-sota to match for the kids

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-20150328_143921.jpg

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-20150321_155454.jpg

  35. #435
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    I want to check if anyone has experienced similar issue with their Framed Minnesota 3.0 that might explain what Iím facing.

    I purchases a 2015 3.0 model in October/December and for the most part had no issues. After about a month I started to experience a loud knocking sound, metal against metal. Itís not all the time but maybe a few times a min and its random and happens when I put pressure on the cranks but not all the time. I canít isolate it but itís coming from the cranks / BB/ or rear hub. The chain tension looks good and everything looks tight and to spec. Iím not able to reproduce with the bike on the bike stand.

    Hopefully this is something someone might have experienced and might have some ideas.

    Thanks
    I have had some creaking and popping and I believe that it is from the fork crown and steered tube interface. It is sleeved and welded at the bottom. Thought it was the headset but a full swap made no change. As I have added some grime and grit it seems to be a bit quieter but still there. Otherwise pull your BB and give it some grease. They were installed dry.
    keep us posted.

  36. #436
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    Quote Originally Posted by WesternMD View Post
    I have had some creaking and popping and I believe that it is from the fork crown and steered tube interface. It is sleeved and welded at the bottom. Thought it was the headset but a full swap made no change. As I have added some grime and grit it seems to be a bit quieter but still there. Otherwise pull your BB and give it some grease. They were installed dry.
    keep us posted.
    Thanks for the reply, this is definitely coming from the BB / Crank or rear hub. The noise is quite loud and metal on metal. Sounds like taking a hammer and hitting the tube Its not cracking popping of the headset. I had that with the Cane Creek Angleset when the local bike shop installed it incorrectly (twice). I finally fixed it my doing it myself or cracking in the frame.

    This is very different and much louder metal hitting metal sound.

    Good advice on greasing the BB. Need to do that in the next few days (its raining anyway)

  37. #437
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    X9 crankset is a MASSIVE improvement.

  38. #438
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chippertheripper View Post
    X9 crankset is a MASSIVE improvement.
    cool, is it 1x10 setup? Looks like RaceFace chainring, 30T?

  39. #439
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    I just finished my build last week.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1360.jpg  


  40. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    cool, is it 1x10 setup? Looks like RaceFace chainring, 30T?
    Yup. 32.
    I did swap the cassette out a ways back though for a 36/11(or whatever the little gear is) for regular MTB gearing.

  41. #441
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    Bottom brack change/upgrade

    Anyone swap out 3 cartridge style bottom bracket & cranks? Something hollow w/external bearings? & cranks? Or.. Has anyone tried servicing cartridge? Pull seals for changing/adding grease?

  42. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildskycomet View Post
    Anyone swap out 3 cartridge style bottom bracket & cranks? Something hollow w/external bearings? & cranks? Or.. Has anyone tried servicing cartridge? Pull seals for changing/adding grease?
    I purchased the Sram X5 Fatbike Crankset GXP, 100mm, still in the box as I have been riding my summer bike but will be swapping the BB and crank soon.

  43. #443
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    Anybody feel like there is some wheel flop on this bike? Also anyone done 29+ yet?
    2014 Singular Gryphon
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  44. #444
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    Lake riding -

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1425a.jpg

    took the FM3.0 out for 32 km cycling the backroads of the "Laura Secord Trail" from Niagara Falls, to wine country vineyards near St Catherine's. Ontario.

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1409b.jpg

  45. #445
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    I have, er had, been enjoying the bike, put the Bluto on a few weeks ago. Well it was stolen last night. Not much chance of getting it back I know, but it's a unique bike. Where do you think I start looking? I called the police of course. I guess all I can do is put up reward flyers, check online selling sites

  46. #446
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    Quote Originally Posted by tig321 View Post
    I have, er had, been enjoying the bike, put the Bluto on a few weeks ago. Well it was stolen last night. Not much chance of getting it back I know, but it's a unique bike. Where do you think I start looking? I called the police of course. I guess all I can do is put up reward flyers, check online selling sites
    fyi - i have worked with the state police recovering high-end stolen bikes (in the USA), and eBay was a source for a large portion of them. Also Pinkbike. eBay knows they sell stolen bikes but completely ignores the emails and phone calls to their "fraud" reporting department stating certain bikes are stolen, even when you give them the serial numbers. they don't care to get involved and let the auctions sales go through. then it is up to the local and state police of the the area the seller is registered in, to pursue them and track them (via email address, IP address, or cell number)... and the detectives then go after them, and usually catch them.

    there are national registeries in the USA and Canada to register the serial numbers... and sometimes, 3-6 months down the line, you might be contacted that a bike was found, or someone tried to cross the border transporting it, and it was stopped and inspected. this usually only applies to high-end bikes.

  47. #447
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    ok thanks for that, I'll keep an eye on ebay.

    A question far all of you guys. Did your bike have a proper serial number? and where was it?

    when I unboxed mine, I flipped it over to take a picture of it, and there was no serial # on the bottom bracket. In the last 20years my bike were all canadian made (Devinci or Dekerf) and had a long serial# on the BB. Do some china manufacturers not bother with this?

  48. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    fyi - i have worked with the state police recovering high-end stolen bikes (in the USA), and eBay was a source for a large portion of them. Also Pinkbike. eBay knows they sell stolen bikes but completely ignores the emails and phone calls to their "fraud" reporting department stating certain bikes are stolen, even when you give them the serial numbers. they don't care to get involved and let the auctions sales go through. then it is up to the local and state police of the the area the seller is registered in, to pursue them and track them (via email address, IP address, or cell number)... and the detectives then go after them, and usually catch them.

    there are national registeries in the USA and Canada to register the serial numbers... and sometimes, 3-6 months down the line, you might be contacted that a bike was found, or someone tried to cross the border transporting it, and it was stopped and inspected. this usually only applies to high-end bikes.
    You forgot the biggest fences on the planet. Craigslist and Pawn Shops. If it was crime of opportunity, i.e. he stepped away for a minute, then it goes to a pawn shop for $100. Or, a person had it scoped out as a personal gift to himself or a quick sale on Craigslist.
    To catch a thief, you have to think like one.

  49. #449
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    sorry to hear of your loss -

    I bought an Alaskan Alloy directly from Framed over the winter. Weeks after the purchase, an envelope arrived from Framed containing a sticker with a serial number.

    So much for an indelible serial number on the frame...

    No idea how they handle Minnesota line.

    Hope you get your ride back.

  50. #450
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    I got that sticker as well, but mine is clearly stamped on the frame.

  51. #451
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1605ayx.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1617ayx.jpg

  52. #452
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    ...2400km since new, and still no issues...

    Stock frame, bluto, cabling, shifters, brakes, FD/RD, hubs, wheels, bulldozer tires.

    Upgrades - ergon grips, nukeproof shortie stem, nukeproof seat post, funn anodized bars, SDK saddle, $11 welgo pedals (they have taken a beating over rock gardens and keep on working), XT 11-36 cassette, X5 36-22 crank.

    Electronics - GoPro, Garmin, Niterider.

    What has broken? - Ragnor aftermarket seat post (split in half). Chainreaction cycles sent me a NukeProof upgrade at no shipping cost from the UK!

    What will be updated soon? - cables and chain, as they went through 4 blizzards,road salt, insane amounts of mud, lots of streams, lots of beach sand, and have about had all they can take...(have Shimano XT smooth coat cables ready to swap)

    coin-op car washes rulez!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-img_1603ah.jpg  


  53. #453
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildskycomet View Post
    Anyone swap out 3 cartridge style bottom bracket & cranks? Something hollow w/external bearings? & cranks? Or.. Has anyone tried servicing cartridge? Pull seals for changing/adding grease?
    I destroyed my cartridge bearing after 550 hard winter beach miles as well as the chain & rear d pulleys. Swapped in a GXP and that's holding up well 150 beach miles later. I see no way to easily service the cartridge bearings as a dismantle could/would be destructive.

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-image.jpg

  54. #454
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    Starting to look for new winter tires for my Minnesota 3.0. Does anyone know if the 45NRTH Dunderbeist will fit on the rear? Looks close in size to the Lou, which I know won't fit.

  55. #455
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    If I am mostly using this in a warm climate for all mountain single track would the Alaskan or Minnesota 3.0 be a better choice? I am looking at the 2X with the carbon fork for either but would consider other builds. Thanks.
    2015 Kona Taro
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  56. #456
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    Hi you guys ; I'm kinda cheating, I don't have a FM 3.0 yet. . I am looking at them seriously tho. It, the F@R and the KHS 3000 are on the short list. . Is there anyone that has had any major frame failures with the 3.0+ 3.0XWT ?
    Thank you!
    Glen

  57. #457
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    AliG;
    I'm very interested in what u r using for studs in your tires. ! I've been looking for your post in this thread where u describe installing them but haven't found it yet.

  58. #458
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    Quote Originally Posted by scaribas View Post
    Starting to look for new winter tires for my Minnesota 3.0. Does anyone know if the 45NRTH Dunderbeist will fit on the rear? Looks close in size to the Lou, which I know won't fit.
    I'm using Vee Snowshoe XL with studs with no issues other then the granny gear on front wit largest sprocket on rear would cause the chain to rub the tire. I stay on 30T in front anyway so no issue for me.

  59. #459
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    Quote Originally Posted by aliG View Post
    150-200 studs per tire. keep the center 2 inches clear of studs. Better traction on pavement sections. Use weatherproof all-temperature silicon sealant...the kind used for outdoors sealing windows and doors....but get the kind that says "extra flex".... let that dry over night. then use lots of talcom/baby powder all around the inside of the tire, before adding in the tube and pumping the tire up. I went to 20 PSI and held it there for 8 hrs... then backed it down to 9 PSI to go snow and ice biking. I did 11 miles on hard pack and ice base, then did circuits around the outdoor pond rink, and it handled very well. QUICK braking. and Standing/balancing starts were very easy. Power slides on the ice really tore it up. 3-4 solid scars in the ice, and the bike stayed in control with that install tread pattern.

    when you go to install the screws, poke a hole through the tread center from the outside to inside, with either a nail, or a tool used for poking holes in things. once its through. mark the inside of the tire with a marker, so you know where to insert the self-drilling screw. make sure the screws go in all the way and they are centered in the tread. i used a piece of 2x4" lumber, as the backing when doing all the hole punching into the tire.

    Studded Dillinger are what, $250 each? I got 500 (#8x3/8" #140 stainless self-drilling) screws from Albany Fasteners for $25, and the sealant from Home Depot for $9. $35 investment vs $400-500. I'll take those odds.

    Attachment 962408Attachment 962409Attachment 962410Attachment 962411Attachment 962412Attachment 962413Attachment 962414Attachment 962415


    AliG;
    This is the post I was looking for. Thank you for the detailed description and very good pics.
    It looks like you have some serious snow fun!

  60. #460
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    I'm using Vee Snowshoe XL with studs with no issues other then the granny gear on front wit largest sprocket on rear would cause the chain to rub the tire. I stay on 30T in front anyway so no issue for me.
    Thanks, that's a good reference point (and those XLs look great on your bike). I'm more concerned with the diameter, which I think might make the Dunderbeist a no-go on the 3.0. Dunderbeist is 760 and Lou is 759, so it seems like it might be a little too tall to fit.

  61. #461
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    The only thing keeping me from pulling the trigger on a 3.0XWT is. No brazeons for front racks. . Since I can run 4.5s on a Boris. And it seems I can only run 4.7s on the 3.0 I'm wondering just how much extra float that .2" will really account for.
    I'm going to be using the bike for off road hunting and want to b able to pack my rifle and shotgun vertically on the front fork.

  62. #462
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Trigger Finger View Post
    The only thing keeping me from pulling the trigger on a 3.0XWT is. No brazeons for front racks. . Since I can run 4.5s on a Boris. And it seems I can only run 4.7s on the 3.0 I'm wondering just how much extra float that .2" will really account for.
    I'm going to be using the bike for off road hunting and want to b able to pack my rifle and shotgun vertically on the front fork.
    Its not as cut and dry just .2" The tires usually aren't what their size says. Some 4.7 tires are more like 4.1. Sometimes they claim they will fit when they won't, and sometimes they fit when they say they won't. I'm not sure what the MAX size is on either of these bikes is, but the best way to determine if it will run the size you want is to see if anyone has fit that on each bike. Both of these bikes have dedicated threads so you should be able to get a pretty good idea of the largest tire people have fit.

  63. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by scaribas View Post
    Starting to look for new winter tires for my Minnesota 3.0. Does anyone know if the 45NRTH Dunderbeist will fit on the rear? Looks close in size to the Lou, which I know won't fit.
    Wait, what?? The Lou won't fit???? I was all set to do the Bud/Lou combo for this winter! The Bulldozers are 4.7, and the Bud/Lou's are 4.8. That little bit is too much?? Say it ain't so!

  64. #464
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    Ben; thank you. We have a Boris X5 that is my wife's. And from measuring I can see it will take 4.5" wide ( actual measured width, with a caliper). Tho, I think her bike will get On One pink Floaters. And some other bright and pretty bits on it.
    Mine however will be as dull colored as I can.make it.
    . Since the Snowshoe XL fits on the 3.0 that counts very well for it imo

  65. #465
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    I'm considering the Minnesota 3.0, but have noticed that many have immediately upgraded the crankset and bb, the cassette from 11-32t to 11-36t, and some have modified the rims to run tubeless.

    As a noob, I'm wondering why the Sturgis Bullet wouldn't be a better stock purchase with the Race Face crankset and bb, the stock 11-36t cassette and tubeless compatible rims?

  66. #466
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    That was the reason I went with the Cogburn CB4. It would b nice if it would run the 2xl Snowshoes or Dillinger 5 . But. That just gives me a reason to get a different bike in the future. And the Sturgis is one I am thinking about.
    For now tho, I can swap wheels between my Cogburn and my wife's Boris. We are planning a road trip for the summer of 16 . Denali Hwy. So cross compatibility is important to me.

  67. #467
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    New Minnesota 3.0 XWT

    Last fall I walked into a bike store and got my first look at a fatbike in the flesh, so to speak, and became obsessed with buying one for the winter ahead. I studied exhaustively, contemplated spending anything from $1000 to $5000. I looked at all the options. On the high end, I reasoned I could ride the bike year round by switching the 5 inch tires out for 29+ wheels in the summer and justify the expense. On the low end, I reasoned I would only ride the bike in the snow in specific places during specific times. I spent hours going through all the major providers. I even borrowed bikes from friends and test rode others from stores I visited. I rode fatbikes from Trek, Cogburn, Salsa, and Surly.

    First, there is no one bike that fits all needs. It really depends on how and where you ride it. I live in western Wyoming high in the Salt River Mountain Range. We get serious snow in the winters. Right now Iím looking at 3ft on my lawn. I ride primarily in the National forest behind my house. Lots of climbing and then descending, in the winter on snowmobile tracks and in the summer of fourwheeler roads. I am middle-aged in good shape.

    The Trek bike I borrowed, a Farly, I actually rode a week or two before the snow started to fall. However, I decided as fun as the fatbike was (and itís a blast), it couldnít replace a good 29er in the summer and fall for me. I decided I wouldnít ride my fatbike year round, but would use it in the winter and selectively in the summer on certain trails where the 4.8 tires would be needed. This immediately dropped my budget to around $2000.

    The Salsa Blackborrow I tested and the Surly Pugsly were great; however, the Salsa was on the expensive side and Pugsly had only 4 inch tires, and I needed wider to stay afloat on the snow trails I intended to ride. The Cogburn was fine, heavy as hell, but a solid bike. However, I didnít want to spend over $2000 for a bike I would ride in December-March, primarily in a very low gear.

    I eventually happened upon Framed fatbikes out of Minnesota. I couldnít believe how cheap they were and passed them over initially figuring they couldnít be in the same league with the flashier brands of Borealis, Salsa, Surly, etc. However, as the weeks passed and my search continued, I kept going back to Framed. With an excellent carbon fork and 4.7inch tires on 80mm wheels with SRAM X7 and Avid components, it was equally equipped to bikes that cost $800 more.

    I didnít like the 38/28t crank up front and the puny 11-32 cassette in the back. I knew that wouldnít cut it. But in the end, I decided to risk ďthe too good to be true,Ē and bought a Framed Minnesota 3.0 XWT with a carbon fork for $1339.00 from DJsBoardshop

    It arrived beautifully packaged in good shape and required some minimal assembly that I had no trouble with. I had to cut the carbon fork to size and install it as it comes with the alloy fork installed and the carbon fork separate, but it was simple.
    I took it out for a few rides and discovered right away the gearing wasnít low enough for climbing in the snow. For under $100 I bought a Wolftooth 42t cog and a SRAM 11-36 cassette, and a 24t chain ring on ebay (Wolftooth wonít work with the 11-32 that came with the bike). Best money I ever spent. With the new, smaller chainring up front, which shifts fine, and the big 42t on backówhich shifts beautifully, I really started to ride this thing.

    Let me be clear: we get snow here. Not the inch or two thatís fun to pedal around on, but 8 to 12 inches overnight when it storms. These bikes arenít magic. You canít ride them through a foot of powder; however, on a packed trail, you can ride them though 4 inches of new snow.

    I have ridden my Minnesota 3.0 XWT extensively over the last month. Up a steadily ascending, rolling, 6 mile dry farm road that gets plowed by a caretaker to an estate at the very top every few daysóthis road is very firm underneath and usually has 2-3 inches of sloppy snow on top. This road is a blast on my new bike. Also, I have ridden the 3.5 mile road to the top of a canyon in the national forest behind my house; this trail is exclusively snowmobile and steep. In deep snow when itís very cold and the snow stays puffy and only one or two snowmobiles have hit it, itís very tough going in places to impossible in others. I built a drag and hit this trail a few days ago with it. We have had about 5 inches of snow since. Today I rode the trail I drug a few days ago, nearly invisible now, and the bike went right up it, no problem. (see pics)
    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-5.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-4.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-3.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-2.jpgFramed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-1.jpg

    Bottom line? This Minnesota Framed bike is awesome. It is indistinguishable in quality and performance from the more expensive bikes I tried (with the caveat that you need the modifications I mentioned). Its alloy frame is light, the balance is excellent, the steering is responsive (love their carbon fork, a steal). I can get it up and going from a full stop while climbing in 4 inches of snow. That takes some doing, and the nimbleness of the bike and grip of the tires make it possible. I couldnít get the Cogburn I tested in the same conditions going as well (admittedly the frame was too big for me).

    If you just want a fat bike to ride in the winter and in select summer conditions and donít intend to replace your 29er mountain bike with it, donít overspend on a flashy name for components and features you wonít get your money out of. I see no reason to put a Bluto on a fatbike you ride in the snow. I have put a solid month on mine in various conditions and havenít missed suspension. I have 6 pounds of pressure in the rear and 8 pound in the front tire, plenty squishy. I also set them up tubeless; easy and the tires work great that way. I have no regrets with my Minnesota 3.0 XWT. The mods work seamlessly and itís a beautiful bike that is a pleasure to ride.
    Last edited by basharteg; 02-08-2016 at 10:28 AM.

  68. #468
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    Hello everyone and fellow Framed Minnesota Fat Bike owners.

    I bought the 3.0 w the Bluto fork and have no real complaints with it at all. As a matter of fact, I am very happy with this bike and want to find 3.0 tires for the summer months so that I use it all year long.

    I did add two bottle cages, under seat bag, a seat post suspension and changed the seat. I like the stock gearing and climb anything I want on the trails here in the Catskill Mtns of NYS. I found the stock bars and grips to be ideal for me and put studded flat pedals on it.

    While I have not found any issues in about 200 trails miles, are there any things I should address before they might become an issue? My only issue so far is the shifting. It seems that you have to make a full stab at the shifters to get reliable gear changes.

    Here is a pic before I put the Bluto on. This is a great fat bike and you can ride it fast.

    I will post a pic of the bike with the Bluto forks once it warms up (about a week) and I go out on my next ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-fat-bike-snow.jpg  


  69. #469
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    Bashertag, your upside down bar setup is perplexing. What are your reasons for setting it up that way? I find the shifter levers on top to be a most interesting choice. Just curious.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  70. #470
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    Bashertag, your upside down bar setup is perplexing. What are your reasons for setting it up that way? I find the shifter levers on top to be a most interesting choice. Just curious.
    Shouldn't have leaked it--it's a new prototype of the new style 'Lowerer' bars that are set to hit the market next year.

  71. #471
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    Idk, perhaps there is an advantage to having the front brake on the right? I would've just flipped the stem. In any case, those are some great pictures Bashertag.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  72. #472
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    I prefer the front brakes on the right, just like on a motorcycle. That saves any chance of a mishap in a quick reaction sort of panic situation.
    I don't know why bicycles are different, but I would think this should be an industry standard to follow, sort of the right and left hands communicating and knowing what the other is doing.

  73. #473
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
    I prefer the front brakes on the right, just like on a motorcycle.
    Since I'm not a motorcycle rider, idnk that. I would imagine that both brake calipers are engaged by the same lever? The other side being the clutch?

    I've heard some cross racers like the front brake on the right side since they mount the bike from the right/drive side. I guess it's helpful on inclines. That was my guess, but wanted to ask for confirmation.

    I'm weird, I mount from the left/ND side.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  74. #474
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    Since I'm not a motorcycle rider, idnk that. I would imagine that both brake calipers are engaged by the same lever? The other side being the clutch?

    I've heard some cross racers like the front brake on the right side since they mount the bike from the right/drive side. I guess it's helpful on inclines. That was my guess, but wanted to ask for confirmation.

    I'm weird, I mount from the left/ND side.
    Right hand = front brake on motorcycle
    Right toe = rear brake
    Left hand = clutch
    Left toe = shift

    I've ridden motorcycles since I was a young kid. Maybe that's why I had a hard time learning the hand brakes on my bicycles. ??

  75. #475
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    Right hand = front brake on motorcycle
    Right toe = rear brake
    Left hand = clutch
    Left toe = shift

    I've ridden motorcycles since I was a young kid. Maybe that's why I had a hard time learning the hand brakes on my bicycles. ??
    Also a lifelong rider of both, and I've never had a problem transitioning. :shrug:

  76. #476
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    I'm "special".

  77. #477
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    We can still be homies. Brap!

  78. #478
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    I was wondering if anyone would catch that. My summer bike has been set up with front brake on right for years ( not sure why) but the Minnesota was set up conventionally. Was bugging me so after a few rides I decided to just flip the bar and see if seemed more natural to me. If it didn't matter much, I was just going to flip it back and I didn't want to change everything without a quick experiment. It felt better so I've since swapped everything to what I'm used to. I'm weird,man.

  79. #479
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    I wondered about settling up Framed wheels and Vee Bulldozer tubeless on my 3.0xwt. I contacted Framed and they said don't do it. Is this their pat response to avoid liability? The Vees say "tubeless ready" on them. Anybody try this yet with this wheel/tire combo? I would love to try it to save some weight. The

  80. #480
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    You will have to use the split tube method or similar, fatty strippers could work. There are a few posts here that discuss the difficulty in setting up the rims for tubeless, but it has been done. I do not know if anyone has used those tires for the conversion though. The rims are Weinmann HL80 rims. If you use your google fu you should be able to find some tutorials and be able to find the method that will work best for you.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  81. #481
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    Framed Minnesota 3.0 XWT Fat Bike w rigid fork, $749.95 at The House.

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    New Owner

    I appreciate everyone who has posted in this thread with info and pictures. Thank you.

    Ordered a 3.0 XWT 16" recently when the bikes went on sale around Black Friday.
    (I'm 5'9", about a 29/30" standover - bike I feel fits me great, an inch or two above the frame for the boys down below.)

    Opted to have The House do 99% professional assembly (Framed Assembly Checklist - Imgur)
    I'm not a bike gearhead, so this was worth it to me. Figured I would have messed up something putting it together myself. After I applied a 5% coupon I found online to the total, I figure the cost of the assembly service cost only 40 bucks.
    The bike came well packaged, and put together perfectly. Just had to pop on the handlebars, front wheel, seat, and my own pedals. They even threw in a pedal wrench and folding tool kit for the things I needed put on myself. Thanks, The House!

    Few things I've added so far are RaceFace grips, Shimano Saints flats, Vomlite bike light.

    Can't wait to hit the nearby beach and trails at Assateague Island.

    Maiden voyage today, at a local park. When off the beaten path, this eats roots, and sails over sandy patches, which there are a lot of around here:
    http://i.imgur.com/bey7KJN.jpg
    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-minnesotaxwt.jpg
    Last edited by Schultz66; 12-16-2016 at 11:30 PM.

  83. #483
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    Couple questions

    1. Are there any difference in frames between the XWT model and the normal model (minnesota 3.0).

    2. Any recommendations for cheap aliexperss tires that can handle a good amount of snow. I was a on a semi packed trail today and was having a hell of a time with the stock 4.0 tires.

  84. #484
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    Quote Originally Posted by NBABUCKS1 View Post
    Couple questions

    1. Are there any difference in frames between the XWT model and the normal model (minnesota 3.0).

    2. Any recommendations for cheap aliexperss tires that can handle a good amount of snow. I was a on a semi packed trail today and was having a hell of a time with the stock 4.0 tires.
    The frame is the same for both models. But if you want to run the big 4.7 tires, then buy the XWT model. Some of the standard 3.0's will not take the big tires. Can't help you on tires, all the tires I use are 150 plus in price.
    RICOH for LIFE
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    If everything is the same except for the tires I don't see why it'd be a problem? I wanted to get the XWT in the 18" model but they were sold out and had to go w/ the standard 3.0 w/o the xwt.

    I'm thinking of running:

    vee bulldozer - rear
    vee snowshoe - front

    Also, my bike came stock with 36-11T rear cassette, despite the website saying it'd ship with a 32-11T cassette.

  86. #486
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    Quote Originally Posted by NBABUCKS1 View Post
    If everything is the same except for the tires I don't see why it'd be a problem? I wanted to get the XWT in the 18" model but they were sold out and had to go w/ the standard 3.0 w/o the xwt.

    I'm thinking of running:

    vee bulldozer - rear
    vee snowshoe - front

    Also, my bike came stock with 36-11T rear cassette, despite the website saying it'd ship with a 32-11T cassette.
    I just know that some 3.0's had issues with taking the big tires in the back. The tires you want to run should work out for you. And as for the cassette, sometimes the web doesn't get updated and they make a change. You will like the bigger range cassette. Hope you enjoy the bike.
    RICOH for LIFE
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  87. #487
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    On the front, you can fit pretty much any of the "big" tires. I have a Bud on the front with plenty of room to spare, and someone earlier in this thread put Snowshoe XLs on front and back. My buddy put a Snowshoe 2XL on the front of his 2.0, so I think even that would work. The XL appears to be about the biggest that could go on back. Haven't tried the Dunderbeist, but that's a big tire that might fit on the rear too.

    Also agree you'll be glad to have the 11-36 cassette. I think that's what they were supposed to come with originally, but it was switched to the 32 at some point. It's a really fun bike when you get it set up the way you like it. We finally got some significant snow this weekend, and it was a blast to get out in that stuff again. Have fun.

  88. #488
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    Looking at a Bluto that has already had the tube cut? It's currently 8 1/4"

    Anyone know if this size will work on the Framed 3.0 17" frame?

  89. #489
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    I've been riding almost daily for a couple of months a Framed Minnesota 3.0 XWT (extra wide tires), which sports the Vee, 4.8 inch "Bulldozers." I've owned a lot of bicycles and still own several, all significantly more expensive than my Minnesota. But, the Minnesota is my favorite.

    I just ordered a Bluto because I can't imagine not riding this bicycle during warmer months.

    Framed Minnesota 3.0 with Bluto Fork &amp; Rigid Fork-jt-rockland-preserve-3-13-17.jpg

  90. #490
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    NBAbucks, yes. I think the steerers are cut to 7 3/4" for the factory forks. More spacers or cut it down a little.

  91. #491
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    Quote Originally Posted by NBABUCKS1 View Post
    Looking at a Bluto that has already had the tube cut? It's currently 8 1/4"

    Anyone know if this size will work on the Framed 3.0 17" frame?
    Yes, the Bluto should fit with no problems.
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