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  1. #1
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    Fixing a flat tire at 10 degrees...

    For those of you that ride in the winter and have had a flat. can a fatbike tube be effectively patched at temps below freezing, particularly from zero to 20? Or do you carry a spare tube and pump?

    If the tube can be patched, do some kits work better than others?

  2. #2
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    Fixing a flat tire at 10 degrees...

    I'm tubeless, but I carry 2 Q tubes. No walking out for me.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  3. #3
    Location: SouthPole of MN
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    I would never personally mess with patching one on the trail. Carry a spare, put spare in, attempt to patch other tube later at home.

  4. #4
    4 Niners
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    I believe that the Park Tool sticky patches would work for that temperature range. You can call Park and ask.

    Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk
    Full rigid SS, Hardtail SS, Hardtail Geared, Full Suspension Geared.

  5. #5
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    I've had terrible luck with patches on a fat tube even when warm out, I say carry a tube!

  6. #6
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    I would carry a spare tube.

    If you want apply a patch in the cold you can light the glue on fire with a lighter and then use a tire lever for mechanical help forming the bond.

    I've patched tires in cold wet situations, but never in sub-freezing temperatures. My only fat flats have been in Baja where it's warm.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  7. #7
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    I "always" have a extra tube and a pump.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    I would never personally mess with patching one on the trail. Carry a spare, put spare in, attempt to patch other tube later at home.
    +1

    I have Stan's in my tubes to give me the best chance of not getting a flat. I have not had once since I added it in, but previously I used to just swap out the tube, even in the middle of summer.

    Riding time is precious, tinkering time is plentiful!

  9. #9
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    flatted on a 18F ride recently - pinched one tube, and had issues getting air in another (think the removable core was loose) - finally got rolling again, but never been so cold in my life! And there wasn't even any snow - rocks hidden under leaves caught me out. Can't imagine messing with patches at that temp - spare tubes all the way! And plenty of CO2....

  10. #10
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    I ride tubeless and carry a tube. I usually also carry a patch kit. At -40, the only way I have been able to patch was by lighting the glue on fire. Stans seems never seems to plug my tires much below freezing, but I seldom get flats at low temperatures.
    I usually carry a down sweater that i throw on so I don't freeze while fixing flats.

  11. #11
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
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    I don't think you can effectively patch a fat tube at any temperature. I carry a spare. I use my patches to help out other riders in need.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I don't think you can effectively patch a fat tube at any temperature. I carry a spare. I use my patches to help out other riders in need.
    I've patched lots of fat tubes. I'm pretty sure my GF's Pugs is rolling on tubes with patches that are 2-3yrs old and going strong.

    There's nothing particularly tricky about patching a fat tube as long as the weather isn't too gnarly.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  13. #13
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    I've no problem doing patches, but ever since i've been rich enough to afford a spare tube, all my roadside repairs have been tube swaps.

    Patching is best done at home - it's more therapeutic.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I don't think you can effectively patch a fat tube at any temperature. I carry a spare. I use my patches to help out other riders in need.
    And I think that you are totally wrong.

    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    And I think that you are totally wrong.

    +1 - LOL - love that photo

    My trail bike is tubeless, but on my MTBs with tubes I have a fascination with how many times you can patch a tube and keep 'er rolling. I don't get a ton of flats so I can't push things too far.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  16. #16
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    What patches are these? I used the park brand for years with no issues now last year I couldn't get one to hold air for nothing..
    When you've seen someone rupture their scrotum on a bike you won't take the standards for top tube clearance lightly!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RossJamis View Post
    What patches are these? I used the park brand for years with no issues now last year I couldn't get one to hold air for nothing..
    I have found that the best patches are Rema. They are the ones with the saw tooth edge. The others are probably Sunlites. They work, but the Rema's seem to have fewer issues. The main thing to do is to abrade the tube surface well. This cleans it, besides giving the glue something to attach to.

    Amazon.com: Rema 25mm Round Patches, 100/Box: Sports & Outdoors

    Amazon.com: Sunlite Bulk Patches: Sports & Outdoors
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  18. #18
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    Anybody had good success patching the "lightweight" 2.5 to 2.75 tubes some of us stretch into our fat tires? Mine seem to invairable fail sooner rather than later. They got me home but carrying a spare tube seems safer, pretty much negates the weight savings but at least in my pack it's sprung weight.
    Latitude 61

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    The main thing to do is to abrade the tube surface well. This cleans it, besides giving the glue something to attach to.
    +1, and on the Rema patches/glue, been around forever 'cuz they "just work". I've always re-talc'd the tube after patching, a little baby powder on top keeps friction from rolling up the patch. Probably much less of an issue with fat tubes. Also, +1 to the notion of swapping tubes on the ride and patching at home.
    Denver Broncos: 98-3 since 1975 when scoring 30+ at home. Shaky start, but you know you're worried...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Anybody had good success patching the "lightweight" 2.5 to 2.75 tubes some of us stretch into our fat tires?.
    I had a lightweight Q tube that blew out while my bike was in the truck. The split in the tube was long enough that it was unpatchable. If the weather is decent, and img not in a hurry, I will patch a tube while out riding. But I have no qualms about throwing a new tube in. Of course, I'm tubeless now and they never fail.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  21. #21
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    Has anyone used co2 cartridges at below freezing temperatures?

  22. #22
    Anchorage, AK
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    Quote Originally Posted by canadiandave View Post
    Has anyone used co2 cartridges at below freezing temperatures?
    Yes, but not since yesterday.
    --Peace

  23. #23
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    ...not even close...those things barely work in the summer...I carry spare tubes and patch them at home or camp, although the vast majority of my tube failures have been have been the result of the stem separating from the tube...no patch for that...
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    Anybody had good success patching the "lightweight" 2.5 to 2.75 tubes some of us stretch into our fat tires? Mine seem to invairable fail sooner rather than later. They got me home but carrying a spare tube seems safer, pretty much negates the weight savings but at least in my pack it's sprung weight.
    Yes, I've patched the Q-tubes 2.75 tubes numerous times, with Rema or Sunlite patches. Never on the trail though, only at home. I carry a spare 2.75 tube in my pack. This tube can be used for my full suspension bike too, so that's a plus.

  25. #25
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    Just go tubeless and leave the tubes at home along with all the flat issues.

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