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  1. #1
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    First Hanebrink ET

    This photo of Dan Hanebrink was taken on Dan's very first ride of the first ET (Extreme Terrain) bike that he ever built in ( I think) the winter of '93.

    This first prototype used off-the-shelf ATV tires and on the snowy trails next to his Big Bear home it was immediately apparent that they were way too heavy. The tires dug in and got plenty of traction and the bike was able to continue on through the snow, but the rider output was way too high.

    Dan's next step was to have a pair of tires shaved down to just almost just the casing. Skat-Trak, a company that modified tires for ATV racers did the job. The resulting tires were much lighter and worked much better.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails First Hanebrink ET-hanebrinketmtbr.jpg  

    Last edited by Bigfoot; 09-04-2012 at 10:19 AM.
    "Yeah, Humboldt County is way the %#@* up there, but worth it!"

  2. #2
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    Actually the "next" tires didn't work that well either, at least not for snow or sand (which was the whole point). They were much lighter but smaller in width and diameter. and he went from an 8" rim to a 4" rim. Both "adjustments" negated floatation. It was easier to pedal around on dirt or pavement though. If it worked better, it would still be around and I'd have restored mine rather than investing in fat bikes.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    Actually the "next" tires didn't work that well either, at least not for snow or sand (which was the whole point). They were much lighter but smaller in width and diameter. and he went from an 8" rim to a 4" rim. Both "adjustments" negated floatation. It was easier to pedal around on dirt or pavement though. If it worked better, it would still be around and I'd have restored mine rather than investing in fat bikes.
    You're talking about when he switched to an off-the-shelf agricultural tire and rim. I'm referring to the early bikes that used shaved down ATV tires of the same size on the bike pictured here. Yeah, even those were heavy compared to today's Fat bikes, but for the time they worked well. We had a lot of fun in Big Bear back then riding on the snowy trails.
    "Yeah, Humboldt County is way the %#@* up there, but worth it!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfoot View Post
    You're talking about when he switched to an off-the-shelf agricultural tire and rim. I'm referring to the early bikes that used shaved down ATV tires of the same size on the bike pictured here. Yeah, even those were heavy compared to today's Fat bikes, but for the time they worked well. We had a lot of fun in Big Bear back then riding on the snowy trails.
    Gottcha Bigfoot, your right. I've got some old pic's of the tires your talking about in an old brochure. That's what I'd like to "match" if I ever get around to restoring mine. Mine is the earlier frame (like pictured here) w/ the jackshaft and the smaller AG tires leave tons of room between the stays for bigger rubber and a wider rim. It's just tough to commit to all the custom fabrication needed to do the project when we have so many cool things happening now or on the horizon with our current fat bikes & etc.

    Would love to complete the project someday though. It is a very cool pedal powered contraption!

    If you know of anybody that's interested in one, send me a PM.

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