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  1. #1
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    Fatbikes on the beach...

    not actually that cool if you're doing it on a moderately crowded public beach in western Michigan.

    Just sayin'.

  2. #2
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    But it's cool when your on a empty beach in Alaska...just saying!


  3. #3
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    Or a deserted Highland beach 5 miles from a public road in the remote NW of Scotland, accessable by a rough 4 1/2 mile track to what is regaurded as the most remote and beautiful beach in the UK...


    Sandwood 2013 067 by coastkid71, on Flickr


    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    not actually that cool if you're doing it on a moderately crowded public beach in western Michigan.

    Just sayin'.
    What brought this on? It can't be any less cool than the tribal-flamed arm banded and tramp-stamped wannabe's that inhabit those same beaches.

  5. #5
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    Or the deserted beaches downunder.

    DJ

    https://vimeo.com/46886347/settings

    Cape Wooolamai beach ride. from DavidJohn on Vimeo.


  6. #6
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    If you are saying so as a fatbiker than you're doing it wrong. There are plenty of desolate stretches were you may see a couple of people per mile that also have great scenery and fun obstacles to ride. Maybe not like the others are posting but well worth getting off the couch.

    If you are saying so as a beach goer than I hope it wasn't me that roosted in your Zima.

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  7. #7
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    A real issue in some places...but try the same place on the next rainy day and you might really enjoy it.

  8. #8
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    Sunday afternoon on a semi-crowded section of beach isn't desolate.

    Beach riding looks like a blast, I almost brought my fatbike with me this year, but beach riding between my daughter's sandcastle and the water, not cool.

    totally understand wanting to ride desolate sections of sand.

    Riding on a populated beach is about as cool as riding a TT bike with aero helmet and headphones on the bike path. Or a playground.

  9. #9
    never summer
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    Have a beer, chillax, then ride it without a care. If that's not your thing, I bet a sunset cruise would be okay. If not you can always head west, we got plenty of uncrowded beaches in OR/WA.
    Fargo Ti + Moonlander + Necro Pug + Nature Boy

  10. #10
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    I would highly suggest bringing it some time and, gasp, venturing past the boundary of the state park you are staying near. You're right tho, public beach riding is a waste (and somewhat dangerous) but that doesn't mean West Michigan doesn't have its share of good beaches to ride. From the seasonal high water mark down is public property, make yourself at home.

    Fatbikes on the beach...-04_14_2013-2733-.jpg
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  11. #11
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    Dang fun with a bunch of pals here on the Washington coast! The beach's Of Wa. and Or. are a big part of what motivated my "high floatation" riding from the begining... snow too, but not as much as the sand! Sand is more like skiing- free to pick your line & carve...



    CK- love the Sandwood film! Gotta get over there some day. Till then, you've got me inspired to try for a trip to the OR. Dunes this month. Not sure I'll get to pull it off... but going to try real hard!!

  12. #12
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    Here's the same route w/ about 4 miles of very crowded beach. It was "Sand Fest" weekend and my first beach weekend on the Fatback (2010). Took a while to navigate the peeps... but they were interesting for sure. And, of course, had to stop & explain the fat bikes to several folks...


  13. #13
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    So, what pressure do you guys usually run your tires on the sand? I'm doing a sort of extended test ride of a Mukluk, and so far I just sink in.

  14. #14
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    Again, I'm all for beach riding, but if yer dodging kids, yer doing it wrong.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SocratesDiedTrolling View Post
    So, what pressure do you guys usually run your tires on the sand? I'm doing a sort of extended test ride of a Mukluk, and so far I just sink in.
    Depends on the conditions for sure (mainly the dryness/looseness). On the NW Fatbikers group ride year before last at Ocean Shores Wa., we had rain previous to the ride and, even though the sand was dry on the surface, it was fairly firm undernieth. I ran 4ish up front and 5ish (psi) rear and was able to carry plenty of speed. At last years meet (the 1st film I posted above) at the same place, there was a record dry spell leading up to the ride and the sand was soft and loose much deeper. We all ran our tires as low as we could to keep afloat. That's different for each rider as per rims, tires,rider weight,etc, but I ran mine as low as +/- 3psi up front and +/- 4 rear. Also, you had to "churn" a bit to get "plaining"... like a boat, and then carry your momentum, un- weight over driftwood, throw your weight back for traction,etc. It is possible to slightly damage tires running them super low... but that's what I bought them for. You can damage other tires riding in sharp rocks or on hot pavement too... it's they're job. If you have the cheaper, heavier (lower tpi) tires, I wouldn't worry to much about it. The lighter (higher tpi) tires are more supple and should float a little better at slightly higher pressures as well. Also, though I know there's disagreement out there on this point, the less tread the better in sand! Sorry Bud & Lou, you are not soft sand tires! Endo's on hunddies will beat Bud & Lou in soft loose sand. Since Endo's are not being made anymore, Larry's or BFL's are the next best thing. All that said, in really big, dry dunes or even just really soft sand, especially if it's all "tracked out" by foot traffic, ATV's or ?... sometimes you'll have to hike-a-bike... just part of the game.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Again, I'm all for beach riding, but if yer dodging kids, yer doing it wrong.
    Easy bro, we crawled and even walked through the most crowded areas. I'm not in your area so I can't "tell you how it is" there, but your welcome to join us on the west coast anytime!

  17. #17
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    This is for SocratesDiedTrolling, Sorry for the "hijack" buckfiddious.

    This was in '09 and my first experience w/ "big sand". About half way through the vid I lost the "wind pack" and dropped into some real soft stuff. I edited out quite a bit of the hike-a-bike. Eventually, I learned to read the sand a little better and tried to go around the soft, fresh stuff as much as possible. Good luck out there! hope you "hook up"!


  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Again, I'm all for beach riding, but if yer dodging kids, yer doing it wrong.
    Yes, you should be running them over. That's what fat tires are for.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Yes, you should be running them over. That's what fat tires are for.
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to SmooveP again.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ward View Post
    This is for SocratesDiedTrolling... Good luck out there! hope you "hook up"!
    Thanks! Last night I went for a ride with some friends mostly on pavement, and then tried some sand. The sand was very loose, and the tires relatively high pressure for the road riding aspect (18 psi), and so the sand riding wasn't very successful. I was disappointed.

    I didn't have much time this evening to go down to a natural sandy area (the river bank), but I did go to a public park with a big sand pit for sand volleyball and such. There was nobody else there, so I just rode around the park a bit, and then tried my hand at the sand. I had the tires squishier this time (8-10psi), and after a couple of tries I got across the pit. I just had to find the right pressure, right gearing, and right technique. Pulling back a little bit, getting my weight shifted more to the rear wheel really helped.

    I must say, it's quite a workout! I dunno if a long sand expedition would be all that fun, at least not on loose, dry stuff.


  21. #21
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    With high volume/low pressure tires like this 1/2 psi makes a noticeable difference and a couple psi makes a huge difference. Don't know what you weigh but from the looks of the sand your trying to ride, I'd say 8-10 is WAY too much for that surface. Yes, you'll have to pump them back up to ride the pavement home... but so does a jeep that's "aired down" for jeeping... again, part of the game. Get a low pressure gauge and let them down to 5-ish (or even a little less) Rr. and even lower ft. (will help "float" the Ft and keep it more steerable) for the sand in that picture. Also, tracked up soft sand is way tougher than untracked sand. If you don't have a gauge, let them out 'till they wrinkle pretty good. With "high floatation", your trying to match the softness, pliability, suppleness to the surface that your riding. On pavement, the harder the better... pavement is HARD and NOT loose. On sand like that, the softer you can go (it might freak you out a bit at first) the better that vehicle (or any vehicle for that matter) will roll over/through it. Scooting the seat back and using a shorter stem can sometimes help keep the front end afloat too and keeping the Ft. softer also helps keeping it from washing out (in soft sand anyway). Everything I'm saying has to do w/ soft, loose sand only. Also, if those are Nates, they're acting like saw teeth and sawing you right into the surface. Mount some Endo's or Larry's and you'll notice a difference there too. Nates are awesome on dirt and wet snow, but all that traction will just dig you in in the soft sand

  22. #22
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    A good newb, no gauge, starting point for pressure on sand is one wrinkle. Sit on your bike in riding position and air down until you get one faint wrinkle in both front and rear sidewalls when the bike is fully weighted. Experiment with airing down slightly from there as you ride to find what works best for the conditions, but one wrinkle should be close enough to get you going.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  23. #23
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    Thanks guys! I'll try one more ride this afternoon before returning the Muk. It belongs to my LBS owner/mechanic. He knows I'm interested in a fat bike, so he let me borrow his to test it out in the real world not just the block around the shop. If I do get one I think I'll go with a Pugsley, mostly due to the rear dropout spacing and ease of using an IGH. The Muk is all that's in stock around here though. But that's another story for another time.

  24. #24
    never summer
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    Just keep airing down until you got a good foot print. Last beach trip I got home and found that I was at 5/6psi F&R. Good choice on the IGH, that's what led me to the Surly. I think I'm going to do the Alfine-8...seems like the best bang for the buck.

    Quote Originally Posted by SocratesDiedTrolling View Post
    Thanks guys! I'll try one more ride this afternoon before returning the Muk. It belongs to my LBS owner/mechanic. He knows I'm interested in a fat bike, so he let me borrow his to test it out in the real world not just the block around the shop. If I do get one I think I'll go with a Pugsley, mostly due to the rear dropout spacing and ease of using an IGH. The Muk is all that's in stock around here though. But that's another story for another time.
    Fargo Ti + Moonlander + Necro Pug + Nature Boy

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