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  1. #1
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    Fat versus Full Stache 8...

    I know its still pretty early in the game, but has anyone tried a new FS Stache 8 and compared it to their existing Fat in terms of will it fit the need? I was leaning pretty strongly towards either a Farley-Ex or Bucksaw, but the FS Stache 8 is an interesting addition / option. My son and I will be riding mostly dirt, very little snow / sand.

    I like the idea of an optimized 29+ (3.0) as a middle ground between Fat and Plus Trail bike. This way I don't have to multiple wheel sets for two bikes plus you get FS and slightly lower weight.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Completely different bikes. I haven't tried a full stache but I do ride a Krampus with front suspension. The plus bike is NOT a fat bike. It can work in really hardpacked snow but so can a regular mtb. It would be much better than a fat bike on dry trails. The weight difference is significant.

  3. #3
    RAKC Industries
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    I've never been a big 29+ person. The further out the weight is pushed from the axle, the more effect it has. I have 29+ for my fat bike for the warm season, but that's full rigid and for commuting/path/adventuring. No trails but open to human powered traffic and no motorized use except US wildlife vehicles. Works great for that but for trails I prefer my 27.5+ with 3.0. roll over of normal 29er while having the plus benefits.

    To me 29+ was like riding my fat bike on 4.8 tires without the bounce.

    And plus bikes don't match fat bikes in the winter but not bad if your running something like 3.0 nobby nics which have huge knobs compared to their skinny counterparts. It's not a 4.0+ fat tire but better than skinny.

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  4. #4
    rth009
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    [QUOTE=roughster;13659448 My son and I will be riding mostly dirt, very little snow / sand. [/QUOTE]


    Others will disagree with me, as would be expected on the fat bike forum, but if you're going to ride very little snow or sand, why are you thinking you need a squishy fatty? I ride my fatty some on dry singletrack from time to tim, but thats usually because another bike is broken or Im bored.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth009 View Post
    Others will disagree with me, as would be expected on the fat bike forum, but if you're going to ride very little snow or sand, why are you thinking you need a squishy fatty? I ride my fatty some on dry singletrack from time to tim, but thats usually because another bike is broken or Im bored.
    Mostly my son has really liked riding the fat bike. I think of it more as confidence booster AND it gets him on the trail. If he outgrows it over time, great, or if he decides he just likes the fatbike, that's cool too.

    That's why I like the idea of the Full Stache 8 as it allows me to move him to a more traditional style but with the comfort of a fatty, the ability to have more specific dirt / trail geometry and intent, as well as open the door for bikepacking as well, which I am thinking about starting to plan our first trip.

    Getting two, one for him and me, increases the quiver "rideability" in case I one of ours goes down. We are both pretty close in height as he is 6'0" and I am 6'1".

  6. #6
    rth009
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    Quote Originally Posted by roughster View Post
    Mostly my son has really liked riding the fat bike. I think of it more as confidence booster AND it gets him on the trail. If he outgrows it over time, great, or if he decides he just likes the fatbike, that's cool too.

    That's why I like the idea of the Full Stache 8 as it allows me to move him to a more traditional style but with the comfort of a fatty, the ability to have more specific dirt / trail geometry and intent, as well as open the door for bikepacking as well, which I am thinking about starting to plan our first trip.

    Getting two, one for him and me, increases the quiver "rideability" in case I one of ours goes down. We are both pretty close in height as he is 6'0" and I am 6'1".

    that makes sense. If the kid likes the fat bike, go for it. I will say, however, having spent lots of time on fatty and 29+ hardtails, that the 29+ does not have as much traction on loose over hard trails as a full fatty does. In some cases, at least with Surly Knards and Vittoria Bombolini 29X3, the traction on loose over hard is not as good as a standard knobby 29er or a full fatty. It looks like the Bontrager XR4 that comes on the full stache may remedy this issue, however.

    If its confidence your son seeks, you cant beat the fatty. If I were getting two however, Id definitely get one of each because for a competent rider who wants to go fast, there is less reason to get a fatty if you do not ride snow or sand.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by roughster View Post
    Getting two, one for him and me, increases the quiver "rideability" in case I one of ours goes down. We are both pretty close in height as he is 6'0" and I am 6'1".

    If you have the means to do both, then emphatically do. It'll make you keenly aware of when fat makes the most sense, and when 29+ shines. After a ~month or so you'll automatically know which bike to choose for which rides, but will likely start to wish for something in between the two -- you'll see...

  8. #8
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    The Full Stache is a fun bike, it rides very well, not at all awkward.

  9. #9
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    As a 5'5" rider, the Full Stache does not come in my size. I have ridden a Bucksaw and I regularly ride with Bucksaw riders, but I don't really find a 4" fat bike, suspended or not, comparable to any conventional mountain bike. A 29+ bike does have a whole lot more contact patch than a 27.5 normal width tire, but a 4" tire of any rim size makes a much bigger difference.

    I rode a Pivot Mach 5.5 and Switchblade 27.5+ back to back at a demo event last week. The former had 2.5-2.6" tires. The latter had 2.8s. I tried really hard, but I really couldn't perceive a difference.

    I ride only fat right now. Were I to buy a conventional mountain bike right now, I would probably go with a plus bike because there are plenty of tires available for it and the slight increase in traction can come in handy. But make no mistake, a plus bike is far closer to a conventional mountain bike than any fat bike.

    Just compare the numbers: conventional MTB: 2.1-2.6" tire, Plus 2.8-3.0.

    Real fat: 4.6-4.8 and common trail midfat: 4"

    A 4" tire is much, much larger, heavier, and higher volume than any plus tire. The difference between a 2.35" and a 3" tire is nothing compared to the difference between a 3" and 4". And a 4" is a relatively modest fat tire.

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