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  1. #1
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    Fat is a state of mind.

    My "Trail/Enduro/All Mountain Bike" TM got jealous of all the fat bike snow posts.

    So when my buddy, who has a Surley Instigator (4.8" up front, 3" in back), called me up and said "Hey, snow ride tomorrow morning. You down?"

    I didn't have much of a choice. It was about 15 degrees F out there this morning and snowing.







    I was faster than the guy on the fatbike.

    15 miles of snow, deepest I got was about 6"-8" of drift. 2.4" @ 15 PSI, 2.35" @ 18 PSI.

    One of these summers, when the Fat Bike market gets saturated and nothing's moving, I'll pick up a frameset and start lacing some wheels. Until then, My All EnduroTrailTM bike will suffice.

  2. #2
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    Wow, you are awesome. One ride and you're the top rooster in the yard.

    I could explain the difference between a fat bike and a regular bike, or you could actually read some of the 7364 threads in this forum. Try some soft sand with your skinny tires, or perhaps even the same snowy trail on a different day. Or just continue the trolling because with one ride, you already know everything there is to know about the difference between fat tires and skinny tires.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  3. #3
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    Thbbbbff;

    If you could ride at all, it was an easy ride. An any-bike ride. You couldn't have ridden what I did today in 3" of snow. Fatbiking IS a state of mind sometimes, but methinks you are on the wrong continent.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  4. #4
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    "I don't have what you have (and secretly want to) so I'm going to tell you about how you don't need it and what I have can do it better" was basically what I read here. What would us guys who have many different mountain, road, and fat bikes (and have actual experience) know though... we're just fap happy bandwagoners, right?
    ...Be careful what you're looking at because it might be looking back...

  5. #5
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    I want a fatbike, just haven't built it yet. And I'm not going to jump on one of the less expensive options (Nashbar, Bikesdirect) yet.


    Calm down fellas, there's plenty of snow for all of us.

  6. #6
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    It's the wide Q Factor from the 100mm BB, bunches our panties every time.
    Latitude 61

  7. #7
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    I spent 2 years trying to convince myself that I didn't need a fatbike too. Now I ride with friends more often (on our fatbikes) in the snow then we ride our mountain bikes in the summer.

    Who'dathunkit?

  8. #8
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    Sounds like you had an awesome time in the snow and with your friends. You don't need a fat bike to ride in the snow as you've discovered. A fat bike just provides another option for snow riding, it's not the only option.

  9. #9
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    As awesome as you are now, you would be even awesomer on snow with some fat tires to match your head.
    Vini vidi velo!

  10. #10
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    FNFAL, you seem to be missing the point. You took the time to come to a Fatbike subforum to talk about how you went on a snow ride and were faster than a fatbike. You did not ride a fatbike, you do not own a fatbike, and you did not talk about fatbikes other than saying you would possibly like to get one someday. This is not a "snow bike" subforum, it's a fatbike subforum, so your post comes across as trolling because it sounds like you are stating that your bike is better than a fatbike, in the snow, based on one ride. I'm not trying to be a dick, I'm just letting you know why people are bothered by your post. If you want to brag about how your non-fatbike rides in the snow, go to a forum that isn't about fatbikes. I don't post about how cool my 26" Fatbike is in the 29er forum because... you guessed it... it isn't a 29er.

    Speaking for everyone (which I don't have permission to do) we LOVE people who are new to fatbikes and have something constructive to say about them. It's a great niche of the bike industry and we like to see others experiencing it. There are threads about people who have ridden them and just don't get it. Most of the responses are along the lines of "glad you tried it, sorry it's not for you." It's not that we aren't happy for you that you had a great ride. Great rides are AWESOME! It's more that your post comes across as condescending to fatbikes. Being a niche area that a lot of people just don't "get", we are a bit sensitive to that when it's based on very limited experience. (at least I am)

    I hope you get a fatbike someday, and I hope you love it. They are awesome bikes, though not for everyone.

  11. #11
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    Re: Fat is a state of mind.

    APPREHEND THE BLASPHEMER AT ONCE!

    When did the fat section become overrun with crybabies? Come on guys. I like my Pugsley, but I definitely don't feel like my personal identity is being compromised when someone doesn't heap praise onto fatbikes.

    Not everyone has to like your bike. Learn to live with it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coloradogoose View Post
    FNFAL, you seem to be missing the point....
    This +1

    The point of a fatbike isn't speed. It's a tool to take you where other bikes cannot go.

    If you're able to ride a skinny wheel bike in the conditions, it wasn't really fatbike territory. Most of us here spent years riding skinny bikes in the snow too, so we do know the difference.

    However sometimes a rider's skill transcends the conditions and he can ride stuff on an ordinary bike that other less skilled riders can't manage even with the best bikes. Perhaps you are that awesome rider, or maybe the snow wasn't that deep.




    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    APPREHEND THE BLASPHEMER AT ONCE!...
    Nah, I just think he got carried away with an excess of enthusiasm, but crucifixion follows the second offence...

    Edit:

    This says it better

    Quote Originally Posted by ntm1973 View Post
    As an experiment, I took my knard wheels for my pugsley to the trail with me last time I did a snow ride. It is a well used park with lots of packed snow. I figured it would be the best case scenario for the 29er+ setup. I ran 7psi tubeless with the knards. I also brought along my fat wheels just in case. The 29er+ ride lasted about 20 minutes and I was back at the car changing my wheels. They did fine on hard packed snow but the soon as it got a little loose in a few areas, I just didn't have any traction/float and had to walk. I am sure the dirt wizard tires will be better in the snow than the knards but there is just something about those big high volume tires on the pugsley that will be impossible to reproduce with a 29er+ wheel setup. Those 29er+ wheels did feel nice and fast on the hard pack though, I am looking forward to some all day rides mountain rides in the summer.


    I think the 29er+ concept has a lot of potential but it just doesn't have the volume to do what a fat bike does.
    (from Krampus - will it satisfy my fat craving? )
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  13. #13
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    I'm just glad he was out riding.

  14. #14
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    Well;

    He did +rep me for my comments, so he's not really as contrary as he sounds. He's just... contrary.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    APPREHEND THE BLASPHEMER AT ONCE!

    When did the fat section become overrun with crybabies? Come on guys. I like my Pugsley, but I definitely don't feel like my personal identity is being compromised when someone doesn't heap praise onto fatbikes.

    Not everyone has to like your bike. Learn to live with it.
    I think it's because we're all a little bit on edge due to The Great Fatbike Backlash that's going on right now. I let him off the hook because he says he wants a fatbike, and because the other bike was not a fatbike (3" rear wheel - I mean, c'mon!).

  16. #16
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    My mind is in a Fat Bike state!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcappy View Post
    My mind is in a Fat Bike state!
    That's the kind of place to be!

    Fatbikes are awesome. I've always wanted to build one up. Don't jump on me for plowing through powder with my 26" hardtail, it's out of necessity.

    Fatbikes are showing up on Tour Divide as well. There were plenty of sections back in 2011 that I would have loved to had bigger tires than my 2.0 Crossmarks.

    And guys, don't think I'm calling fatbikes a "useless fad". I've been riding 650b on my main bike for nearly four years. Trust me, I've heard the "Fad" arguments before!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FNFAL View Post
    ...Fatbikes are awesome. I've always wanted to build one up. Don't jump on me for plowing through powder with my 26" hardtail, it's out of necessity....
    Puts the nails and wooden cross away...
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  19. #19
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    Hey;

    Like somebody said, we've all been riding our skinny bikes in the snow for years. Problem was, not much. Not much riding unless there was not much snow. Now, there is no consternation when the ruler says over 4" You can go and ride. The only question is can you develop the knowledge and the mental toughness to try and work over/through/around/with the conditions. Skinny is on the trainer. Fat is out there bringin it!
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailMaker View Post
    Hey;

    Like somebody said, we've all been riding our skinny bikes in the snow for years. Problem was, not much...
    It was pretty hard work.

    Still is, but there's less bike hiking involved.



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  21. #21
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    FNFAL,

    I know it probably wasn't your intention to incite a negative response but you would probably get a similar response if you went to the down hill forum and said how you are taking a rigid 29er downhill and thus insinuating that big travel downhill bikes are overkill for the Red Bull Rampage.

    Pretty much +1 on what everyone else said, just adding:

    It's always the Indian, not the arrow. The important thing is to get out and ride, it sounds like you had a good one. Being faster isn't ALWAYS the goal of the ride. You're more likely to remember the rides you spent talking to your friends, not dropping them.

  22. #22
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    'Rung what you brung' nothing wrong with that, but as it's said 'water seeks its own level'

    He was lucky the conditions allowed him to ride the ride, at some point he may encounter conditions that he won't be able to ride his skinny tires in the snow, then, he won't have the right tool for the job. A fat bike is just another tool in the stable, and a fun to ride tool they are !

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntm1973 View Post
    FNFAL,

    I know it probably wasn't your intention to incite a negative response but you would probably get a similar response if you went to the down hill forum and said how you are taking a rigid 29er downhill and thus insinuating that big travel downhill bikes are overkill for the Red Bull Rampage.

    Pretty much +1 on what everyone else said, just adding:

    It's always the Indian, not the arrow. The important thing is to get out and ride, it sounds like you had a good one. Being faster isn't ALWAYS the goal of the ride. You're more likely to remember the rides you spent talking to your friends, not dropping them.
    Don't be so sure of FNFAL'S benign intentions. Had a run in with him before. An innocuous exchange about multiuse trails ended up with neg rep for me and him schooling me on his favorite automatic weapons.
    Vini vidi velo!

  24. #24
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    Nice try guy. A regular mountain bike is no fat bike. I have a 29er with 2.4 tires on Blunt 35 that measure out 2.5 and they have nothing on a any fat tire I've ridden. Most fatbikes I've ridden are pretty slow, but they go where no other bikes can go. If I could ride a regular mountain bike around the city like I can a fat bike, I wouldn't have a fat bike. I know that every other bike I have is faster. Heavy wheels and tires feel super slow especially when you don't need them, like days when you could ride a 29er through a few piles of light powdery snow. Then again, I saw a 22lb fatbike recently and IMO the Pugsly seems especially slow.

  25. #25
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    I think everyone's already covered all the bases but I will still add my .02 worth.
    Like everyone else I have ridden my normal MTB in the winter, where my fatty takes over is days like yesterday. Fresh wet snow with rain, tons of slush in the woods in the low areas. Was still hard on the fatty and still had to walk a few sections but other than that my 2.4 would have stopped working 100 meters into the ride and I would of had to turn around an go home or push the bike the entire ride. Is the fatbike slower, hell yeah but out riding this time of year isn't about speed it just getting out and having fun. It's even better when you pass hikers and they just stand in awe of your tires, not one person has had a negative comment, everyone is just so blown away but the size of the wheels. Most are " I can't believe your out riding in this and holy shit look at those tires"
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  26. #26
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    We all agree our fatbikes are "slow", but what is fast?

    Is it a momentary burst of speed while you're fresh, or is it a good average speed over a substantial distance?

    The reason I raise this is that in the last 3 years when I have used my fatbike in the StrathPuffer 24 hour, I have done a personal best twice, and equalled my previous personal best. I've done 9 of those races, always on single speed rigid bikes. The previous bikes are top quality lightweight 26" and 29er, yet I'm doing better on my Pug which is twice the weight and is well known as "slow".

    (At my age it's not a question of me getting faster or fitter, it's more of a question of delaying the inevitable deterioration )
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  27. #27
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    I did a group ride yesterday in 2-3" of mashed potatoes. I was on my fat bike, while everyone else was on regular mountain bikes - mix of 27.5, 26 and 29ers. I had a slight advantage climbing straight up hills, I was getting more traction than anyone else. Turning in this stuff was equally difficult for everyone, with the guy on the 27.5 doing much better than anyone else, which I think was more of a skill thing than anything else. I'm running Floaters, I'm sure Nates would have done better, but it was one of those days where cutting through and floating over the snow gave the same results (more or less).

  28. #28
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    Hey;

    This is not going to be earth shattering, just blather, but I find it an interesting study in "flotation." I rode Saturday in 3-4" of week old 34* snow. I only put in about 2 miles, and yet was quite gassed by the end. Please allow some exception for my out-of-shape Winterness, to some degree. I did most of my riding through open forest where there are no trails. Side-hill (5-10* pitch) glacial morraine territory littered with 2-4' high humps and mounds over the entire surface. There is no flat ground here, and the deciduous floor area is covered with a super thick layer of decaying leaf matter, old branches, and various deadfall. This type of odd rocky terrain also generally promotes very shallow/wide root growth, so there were plenty of those to deal with, quietly lurking in their camouflaged state.

    In thinking back on it, I could not have done that with any other bike. I had to zig zag may way up the hill to keep moving, partly due to traction, partly the grade, and partly my own limitations, and even that proved difficult. There were many stalls, slips, and plain old rest stops to get my breathing/heart rate back down. If I chose my line well, through the standing and downed trees and smaller humps - which is hard to do while you trying to simply get through, let alone clean, the stuff you are currently on without stalling or crashing - I could ride fairly successfully. If I got too busy or distracted by techy stuff under my wheels or crashing through gauntlets of dead pine branches, it was 20' and stall kind of stuff. There was no hike-a-bike involved, just the challenge to keep moving by pedal. Quite a challenge it was. My kind of riding.

    I could not have done that on any other bike. A very strong rider possibly could have had variously equal success in the dry summer on a skinny bike, although it would have been immensely difficult, but no chance at all even in this shallow blanket of white. I doubt I could, on a skinny bike in the dry. It occurs to me that the snow made it easier in some sense. Yes, the slightly apple sauce snow made traction moderate, but it's thin depth got me into the terrain below, just a bit. I aired up the Nates just a bit from pure deep snow settings (up to 6-7F/R) to sink better into the forest "carpet" underneath and milk it for grip. The snow acted as a bit of a filler, leveling the surface. So too did it mask what was underneath. A classic trade of pluses and minuses.

    I'm sitting here thinking, "Velo knows what I'm talking about." Yep, my kind of riding. Fat roolz. Blather, off.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    APPREHEND THE BLASPHEMER AT ONCE!

    When did the fat section become overrun with crybabies? Come on guys. I like my Pugsley, but I definitely don't feel like my personal identity is being compromised when someone doesn't heap praise onto fatbikes.

    Not everyone has to like your bike. Learn to live with it.
    You obviously aren't a 'real' "fatbiker".
    I can tell because you didn't say "fatbike" at least 6 times in your post.

    I doubt anybody in the DH forum would give a damn if someone shared their experience about DHing on a rigid 29er, because they're still downhilling. Same with the DJ/BMX forum - it's about a common type of riding insted of just a common shopping outcome. I know a many people put a lot of emphasis on WHAT you ride rather than HOW you ride it, but IMO, gear cliques are lame. And I have yet to figure out what the difference is between 'fatbiking' and plain old 'riding'.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I doubt anybody in the DH forum would give a damn if someone shared their experience about DHing on a rigid 29er, because they're still downhilling. Same with the DJ/BMX forum - it's about a common type of riding
    Yes it is, the riding of fatbikes. As someone else already pointed out, this is the FATBIKE forum, not the SNOWBIKE forum. They are not interchangeable. Fatbikes aren't just for riding in snow. I know more than a few people that ride their fatties all year. So in essence, you agree with the person you are arguing with.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I know a many people put a lot of emphasis on WHAT you ride rather than HOW you ride it, but IMO, gear cliques are lame. And I have yet to figure out what the difference is between 'fatbiking' and plain old 'riding'.
    I have 3 thoughts on this:

    1) If we say we agree with you, will you promise to go away? (We'd be lying about agreeing with you.)

    2) A "gear clique"? That's French for the sound my bike makes when I shift, right?

    3) Fatbiking IS a lot like regular riding, except it's better because you're not there.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    ...And I have yet to figure out what the difference is between 'fatbiking' and plain old 'riding'.
    Perfectly valid differentiation.

    We all know what is being referred to when someone talks about downhilling, or bmxing.

    Maybe you're not taking your bike into the unreachable places...
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    This whole things sounds like the old 27.5 is not the real sweet spot of wheel size and 26 is dead 29 is the new 26 LOL, lets face it we all ride what we ride and we will justify it till our last breath. It all boils down to we are all out riding on two wheels having fun and thats what its all about right. I consider all my bikes the right tool for the right job, for deeper snow and muddy spring riding I have my fatty, when the trails dry up then out comes my FS 29er and for my trials I have a trials specific bike, could I do all of this with one bike, sure I could would I have as much fun HELL NO! I have yet to buy a road bike I just can't force myself to do that. I don't want to be in the "roadie clique" LOL
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Perfectly valid differentiation.

    We all know what is being referred to when someone talks about downhilling, or bmxing.

    Maybe you're not taking your bike into the unreachable places...
    I know it's just a stupid esoteric type of thing, but I'd say if taking your bike into 'unreachable' places, or even riding on terrain that is typically unridable on any other type of bike, was strictly the definition, then I might think 'fatbiking' might be be uniqe enough to be seen as an actual distinct riding discipline. But lots of people don't do any of this, but still seem to call what they do 'fatbiking', as if buying a bike with extra floaty tires somehow makes the riding they're doing unique. But it's clear from what I see in this forum that 'fatbiking' has only one thing that defines it - somebody bought one.

    For example, with downhilling, it doesn't matter what bike you ride. If you spend the day riding it up a chairlift and down a mountain, you went downhilling. Same goes for dirt jumping, trials, park or street riding, BMX racing (yes you can race BMX on a mtb), XC riding, whatever the discipline. None of these are defined solely by the purchase of a certain slightly unique style of bike, but by the actual type of riding done (mainly determined by terrain). If you ride your DH bike around the local XC loop, are you DHing? Obviously not.; you're doing the same type of riding anyone else is doing there. But run a little extra float in your tires, all of a sudden, you're taking part in some magical new and singular activity. The OP here went on a ride with a guy on a fat bike. They both covered the same terrain, at the same time. You would say one guy is 'fatbiking' (and possible get a little misty about it), the other is....well, he's doing something different. But as far as I can tell, there's no difference whatsoever except what they swiped their credit cards on. It just seems kinda contrived (and in some cases, pretentious) to me.

    Not that there's anything wrong with riding huge tires if that's what makes you happy. Hell, more power to you if you're riding them in the types of conditions they were developed for. I think it's cool as hell to see some of the pictures, etc here of people really pushing what's possible to ride, on bikes that have been specifically customized to allow it. I've had a few snowy rides lately where I would've seriously like to have some more float myself. But on the days I reach for the bike with the biggest tires, I wouldn't consider myself doing anything but plain old XC riding, particularly if it's in conditions that could be ridden on any bike, which is what I see a lot of 'fatbikers' doing with them. So, IMO, cool bikes? Yes. Distinct type of riding? Not at all.

    (And please take this in the tone in which I meant it, which would be post-ride, around-the-fire, old fashioned friendly ball busting. It's really not important at all. Like I said, just esoteric hair-splitting to counter a small bout of boredom.

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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I know it's just a stupid esoteric type of thing, but I'd say if taking your bike into 'unreachable' places, or even riding on terrain that is typically unridable on any other type of bike, was strictly the definition, then I might think 'fatbiking' might be be uniqe enough to be seen as an actual distinct riding discipline. But lots of people don't do any of this, but still seem to call what they do 'fatbiking', as if buying a bike with extra floaty tires somehow makes the riding they're doing unique. But it's clear from what I see in this forum that 'fatbiking' has only one thing that defines it - somebody bought one.

    For example, with downhilling, it doesn't matter what bike you ride. If you spend the day riding it up a chairlift and down a mountain, you went downhilling. Same goes for dirt jumping, trials, park or street riding, BMX racing (yes you can race BMX on a mtb), XC riding, whatever the discipline. None of these are defined solely by the purchase of a certain slightly unique style of bike, but by the actual type of riding done (mainly determined by terrain). If you ride your DH bike around the local XC loop, are you DHing? Obviously not.; you're doing the same type of riding anyone else is doing there. But run a little extra float in your tires, all of a sudden, you're taking part in some magical new and singular activity. The OP here went on a ride with a guy on a fat bike. They both covered the same terrain, at the same time. You would say one guy is 'fatbiking' (and possible get a little misty about it), the other is....well, he's doing something different. But as far as I can tell, there's no difference whatsoever except what they swiped their credit cards on. It just seems kinda contrived (and in some cases, pretentious) to me.

    Not that there's anything wrong with riding huge tires if that's what makes you happy. Hell, more power to you if you're riding them in the types of conditions they were developed for. I think it's cool as hell to see some of the pictures, etc here of people really pushing what's possible to ride, on bikes that have been specifically customized to allow it. I've had a few snowy rides lately where I would've seriously like to have some more float myself. But on the days I reach for the bike with the biggest tires, I wouldn't consider myself doing anything but plain old XC riding, particularly if it's in conditions that could be ridden on any bike, which is what I see a lot of 'fatbikers' doing with them. So, IMO, cool bikes? Yes. Distinct type of riding? Not at all.

    (And please take this in the tone in which I meant it, which would be post-ride, around-the-fire, old fashioned friendly ball busting. It's really not important at all. Like I said, just esoteric hair-splitting to counter a small bout of boredom.

    Wow, all that philosophy and your still missing the point ! Quite simply, it's about the individual experience, not your perceived experience of what others do for whatever reasons. I ride fat, therefore I am. Now leave us alone !!

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    Did somebody just slap some snow on their skinny bike and made a long a$$ post?

    Why so much attempt at pigeon-holing to hate any one particular kind of bike.. See the same here as when I did a lot of singlespeeding. Haters will always be haters

    For fekk sake its just another bike but this time with2 obscene rubbers that still need a pair of legs to pedal. Ok a little more legs at times.

    Like it, have the cash, spring for it and ride as deem fit.
    I even do a lot of things with mine that it is "not" suppose to and pay the price for it. But then I'm gonna go out now and do more stoopid stuff after pressing the "post" button.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anvil_den View Post
    For fekk sake its just another bike but this time with2 obscene rubbers that still need a pair of legs to pedal.
    Exactly my point. So what's with all the people getting gushy and making it out to be so much more? You can't pretend that's not blatantly evident in this forum. Saying 'fatbiking' is some unique type of riding is the same as saying 'full suspensioning', '29ering' or 'wide handlebarring' are also actual styles of riding, as opposed to just one of a million choices you can make wrt your equipment.

    Like the bikes, hate the overblown hype.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danaco View Post
    Quite simply, it's about the individual experience, not your perceived experience of what others do for whatever reasons.
    So, you're saying that the OP WAS actually 'fatbiking'? That was his individual experience from the sound of it.

    Nope, cuz 'fatbiking' is purely dependent on some arcane equipment guidelines. Didn't buy the 'right', very specific equipment? You're experience doesn't matter.

    Whatever, if labelling what you're doing as something special makes you happy, then go ahead and be happy about it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I know it's just a stupid esoteric type of thing, but I'd say if taking your bike into 'unreachable' places, or even riding on terrain that is typically unridable on any other type of bike, was strictly the definition, then I might think 'fatbiking' might be be uniqe enough to be seen as an actual distinct riding discipline. But lots of people don't do any of this, but still seem to call what they do 'fatbiking', as if buying a bike with extra floaty tires somehow makes the riding they're doing unique.

    ....But on the days I reach for the bike with the biggest tires, I wouldn't consider myself doing anything but plain old XC riding, particularly if it's in conditions that could be ridden on any bike, which is what I see a lot of 'fatbikers' doing with them. So, IMO, cool bikes? Yes. Distinct type of riding? Not at all...
    I can't really speak for what others do because almost all my riding is done solo, so I don't see other riders very often.

    A typical ride may have me riding up to 15 miles on the road, then on to general trails (natural and forestry track) for many more miles, and then across country (no track) which will include bogs, deer paths, carrying the bike, chucking it over 7' high deer fences, dragging it through heather and such like. Other times, I'll head straight up the hill at the back of my home, and spend several hours covering maybe 3 miles while investigating archeological sites and my wheels will not touch a track or trail at all.

    To me that's all fatbiking, not x% roadbiking, y% trailriding, and z% fatbiking.

    Then again, I have been known to set off on my road bike, and do exactly the same sort of ride as described above (with obviously more hike a bike involved). Probably categorise that as trail riding.

    Looking at it from a different angle. When I ride my fatbike on a trail, I will be riding it in a completely different manner to my skinny mtb. On the skinny mtb I'm actively checking out every obstacle to work out how to get around/over it. On the fatbike I don't bother, I just plough on. The difference in the riding style needed was brought home to me forcibly today when I took my old 1x1 out for a trot. Suddenly I needed to have my full attention on the track rather than what was around. It was actually quite embarrassing how often I got caught out on a trail I don't even have to think about normally. So even if the fatbike is just used on a trail, it's a different riding style and worthy of the name, fatbiking.

    I can see what point you're trying to make, but it's reminiscent of the "how many angels fit on a pinhead" type discussion.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    So, you're saying that the OP WAS actually 'fatbiking'? That was his individual experience from the sound of it.

    Nope, cuz 'fatbiking' is purely dependent on some arcane equipment guidelines. Didn't buy the 'right', very specific equipment? You're experience doesn't matter.

    Whatever, if labelling what you're doing as something special makes you happy, then go ahead and be happy about it.
    So you're the self-appointed arbiter of what's acceptable to be enthusiastic about?
    Is it acceptable to be enthusiastic about mountain biking in general?
    About a particular brand of bikes?
    About a mountain biking destination?
    About a mountain biking organization?
    About a brand of beer?

    Are fatbikes worthy of the hype? That's totally subjective. Here's my perspective: I've been a mountain biker for 26 years, more XC and adventure oriented rather than DH or extreme stuff. I do enjoy occasional racing, riding rocks, getting stupid and drinking beer. I ride maybe 150-200 days a year.

    I admit to being a gearhead. I appreciate well made bikes and parts from both engineering and aesthetic angles. I also appreciate how a well made and/or innovative piece of gear can improve the riding experience.

    Unlike the differences among 26/27.5/29" wheeled bikes, the experience of riding a fatbike is significantly different. You may not like the difference, but I do, and it appears that at least a few thousand others do as well, so you might want to consider that there's more to it than simply the novelty factor. Specifically, I like the stability, the suspension-without-suspension feeling, the traction, and yes, even the handling. But unlike some others, I think semi-uncontrolled bouncing around in rock gardens is fun. I'm 3 years into the "fad" and my other bikes rot in the shed. I will officially go on record as saying that the fatbike hype IS warranted.

    You continue to expend a fair amount of time explaining your viewpoint, which would appear to be: "I think fatbikes are OK, but not really all that great. I just don't like the people who ride them."

    (BTW, you might gain a shred of credibility if you admitted whether you've ridden one enough to pass judgement.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Exactly my point. So what's with all the people getting gushy and making it out to be so much more? You can't pretend that's not blatantly evident in this forum. Saying 'fatbiking' is some unique type of riding is the same as saying 'full suspensioning', '29ering' or 'wide handlebarring' are also actual styles of riding, as opposed to just one of a million choices you can make wrt your equipment.

    Like the bikes, hate the overblown hype.

    Have fun out there.
    Thank you! Exactly!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Is it acceptable to be enthusiastic about mountain biking in general?


    (BTW, you might gain a shred of credibility if you admitted whether you've ridden one enough to pass judgement.)
    Sure, You can even be enthusastic about your choice of tire size, if it's really so wildly exciting to you. Doesn't mean every time you ride, what you're doing is so unique compared to what everyone else has been doing forever that it's a legitimate new genre, or that tire width choice somehow rises to the 'lifestyle' level, as some of the more gushy folks seem to think.

    You don't have to ride every tire on the planet to understand the concept of large tires / low pressure. It's not a some big mystery. There are advantages and disadvantages. I've been riding long enough to form an opinion re: when people are jumping on a bandwagon and getting all evangelical about some piece of gear or other being the be-all and end-all. Near as I can tell, the majority of people who own fatbikes fall into a couple camps - those that actually use them regularly in conditions that call for them, and everybody that ever bought a set of Mary Bars for their rigid SS.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Near as I can tell, the majority of people who own fatbikes fall into a couple camps - those that actually use them regularly in conditions that call for them, and everybody that ever bought a set of Mary Bars for their rigid SS.
    FWIW, I'm friends with a guy who is in both camps.

    Now that I think of it, I bet Velobike would be in both camps too. Simultaneously during one ride.

    I think the idea of "fat biking" as a verb died for me when I got spanked in pedals-deep powder by a racer fellow riding - in front of me - on a CX bike. He looked like the wacky waving inflatable arm flailing tube man, but I realized a good rider can take any bike into any conditions, and that fat bikes have practical limitations that aren't worth the price of entry for many, and perhaps too many people find out too late.

    That said, if I only could have one bike, it would be fat bike. Can't imagine not having one.

    Actually I'm without one right now and I'm going a LITTLE CRAZY.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Sure, You can even be enthusastic about your choice of tire size, if it's really so wildly exciting to you.
    Sometimes I dream of my 4" tires, their supple 180TPI sidewalls glistening with droplets of fresh cool water from a mountain stream, inflated to perfection with 6.5psi of imported air from the Colorado Rockies, and I can't help but think, man, is that slapheadmofo guy a douche.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    .... Near as I can tell, the majority of people who own fatbikes fall into a couple camps - those that actually use them regularly in conditions that call for them, and everybody that ever bought a set of Mary Bars for their rigid SS.
    Dude, I think you fell off the trail there. I just got back from a 20+ mile ride on snowmobile trails with a few friends, including a long-ass climb to the top of a mountain. Two of us were on fat bikes, two were on FS bikes with 2.3" studded tires; we all made it the whole way. The difference was the fatbikers were riding virtually everything and the MTBers were walking, at times a lot. There is no doubt the two of us riding fat had a whole lot more fun, and all four of us would agree on that.

    For me, that's what it's all about. I've owned an original purple Pugs for almost 8 years and still love it for these kinds of conditions. It will never be my year-round bike. I would like a set of Mary bars to make my old wrists more comfortable, but am not sure how those fit in the conversation...

    I get that you understand the concept of big tires, but until you ride one in conditions they were made for you're not going to understand a lot of the people in this forum. Take Daren's bike for a rip and you may have your mind blown.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    I can't help but think, man, is that slapheadmofo guy a douche.
    I just wasted 5 minutes of my life reading this thread and that's about all I got out of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    ...Near as I can tell, the majority of people who own fatbikes fall into a couple camps - those that actually use them regularly in conditions that call for them, and everybody that ever bought a set of Mary Bars for their rigid SS.
    You're talking like a sad fashionista troll.

    Your comment about Mary bars demonstrates a staggering depth of ignorance. It's not some fly-by-night fashion accessory.

    Mary bars are simply a slightly larger version of a bar which has been in widespread use in this country for over 80 years. Over those decades it has been very popular with people who were riding mountains, on of course, rigid singlespeed bikes (usually fixed wheel).




    Mary bars on a rigid singlespeed that does considerable mileages.






    Mary bars on a rigid singlespeed that does considerable mileages.







    Mary bars on a rigid singlespeed 20 hours into a 24 hour solo ride.







    Predecessor to Mary bars on a singlespeed over 8 years ago.







    The people I know who use Mary bars do so because they are comfortable when they are spending long periods in the saddle.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Sometimes I dream of my 4" tires, their supple 180TPI sidewalls glistening with droplets of fresh cool water from a mountain stream, inflated to perfection with 6.5psi of imported air from the Colorado Rockies, and I can't help but think, man, is that slapheadmofo guy a douche.
    But when you think about it, who's really the douche? Me, for having an opinion based on a lot of years riding that I can (arguably) back up, or you, who gets so butthurt that there are people out there who don't immediately fall down and worship at their tire choice, they need to jump to the personal attacks?

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    I drank the cool aide for the first few years of owning a fatty but now I prefer to hang it up in favor of other steeds when conditions call for it. I do believe the hype has steered a few in the wrong direction over the years but most have been very happy. Still when winter rolls around it's all about the fat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    But when you think about it, who's really the douche? Me, for having an opinion based on a lot of years riding that I can (arguably) back up, or you, who gets so butthurt that there are people out there who don't immediately fall down and worship at their tire choice, they need to jump to the personal attacks?

    Pot, meet kettle.
    Sorry, I'll admit there's a possibility you're not a douche.

    As for backing up one's opinion, I laid out a list of reasons for my opinions, plus my background so you could maybe see where I was coming from. You won't even answer a simple question of whether you've ever ridden a fatbike. Your posts are full of insults - to fatbikers, singlespeeders, even Mary bar users!

    You may have a valid point buried in there somewhere, but I'm still not sure what it is. (Also, "butthurt" is the favorite word choice of failed trolls everywhere.)

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    People in these forums are just plain nuts. I can't believe people really argue about riding bicycles.. hahah... I mean really, a state of mind? hahahha... We ride because it's fun.. That really sums it up, doesn't it?

    Fat bikes are cool, just a different ride (and fun)... No, you don't need a fat bike to ride in snow. But, there are instances both types of bikes are going to suck in certain snow conditions. I know here in MA, I rode my SS 29er with some fatboys in about 4" of pow and it was great. A week later, I rode in similar depth but the snow was different, and it was awful. Awful for fats and skinny's..

    I think the Fat Bike thing is way over hyped; but I'm not going to lie, I want one... I'm just waiting for the right bikes... The Specialized Fatboy is about the best I've seen for what I'm looking for...... Price/performance.
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    This thread is really enlightening. I gather some people may ride regular bikes in the snow. The suggestion of such is an affront to the fat bike clique. Thereupon an internet argument ensues.

    Keep up the good work boys!

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    Jeez, who let the trolls in? This forum has been turning rancid over the last couple of months. It's like we're getting an overflow from a fashionista hipster forum.

    Where's the hype about fatbikes? Their faults are pretty well documented in this forum.

    Who cares if people ride regular bikes in the snow? Everyone with a fatbike has done that, and that's probably why they have bought fatbikes - because they like riding in the snow or in crap conditions.

    This is a forum for people who ride fatbikes.

    If you don't like that, go somewhere else. Don't pollute this forum.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    who's really the douche? Me
    I consider the whole question settled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Saying 'fatbiking' is some unique type of riding is the same as saying 'full suspensioning', '29ering' or 'wide handlebarring' are also actual styles of riding...
    Well;

    80% of the time, I ride my Fatty just like any other MTB. I ride it year'round. The other 20% is riding stuff I cannot ride on any other bike. Not nearly as successfully, anyway. Whatever the circumstance, just like an SS is single speeding, a Fatty is a different bike to ride, so I consider it all Fatbiking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Sorry, I'll admit there's a possibility you're not a douche.

    As for backing up one's opinion, I laid out a list of reasons for my opinions, plus my background so you could maybe see where I was coming from. You won't even answer a simple question of whether you've ever ridden a fatbike. Your posts are full of insults - to fatbikers, singlespeeders, even Mary bar users!

    You may have a valid point buried in there somewhere, but I'm still not sure what it is. (Also, "butthurt" is the favorite word choice of failed trolls everywhere.)
    Pardon the "butthurt", trying to keep things PG-13. It was handy.

    There's also a fair chance that I am a douche on occasion, so who knows you could be on to something.

    I seriously have absolutely nothing against SS, any sort of handlebar, or any size of tires, or really anything anybody else does for fun (within reason of course). And the Mary Bar comment was an attempt at humor (and holds pretty true). I'm pretty sure I'll end up adding a fatbike to my stable at some point, and I'm sure I'll have a good time on it and I'll ride it for no reason other than I feel like it at times. Like I said, I'm admittedly splitting hairs. Maybe it could be "fatbiking" when done on regular terrain and "FatBiking" on the messy stuff.

    And I can't believe people actually get pissed about this stuff.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Pardon the "butthurt", trying to keep things PG-13. It was handy.

    There's also a fair chance that I am a douche on occasion, so who knows you could be on to something.

    I seriously have absolutely nothing against SS, any sort of handlebar, or any size of tires, or really anything anybody else does for fun (within reason of course). And the Mary Bar comment was an attempt at humor (and holds pretty true). I'm pretty sure I'll end up adding a fatbike to my stable at some point, and I'm sure I'll have a good time on it and I'll ride it for no reason other than I feel like it at times. Like I said, I'm admittedly splitting hairs. Maybe it could be "fatbiking" when done on regular terrain and "FatBiking" on the messy stuff.

    And I can't believe people actually get pissed about this stuff.
    I don't think anyone is pissed. The OP posted something wanting a response, otherwise he wouldn't have posted it. People shared their opinions, I wouldn't call someone with a different opinion than me, butt hurt, pissed, etc. I doubt anyone is that emotionally invested in their equipment.

    I never say "I'm going fatbiking." It's always, "I'm going mountain biking" What bike I grab is irrelevant but this is a fat bike forum, not the passion forum and for whatever reason, people feel it necessary to pop in here on a fairly regular basis to share their opinion about how they/others don't need a fat bike or how they are silly. The reality is that no one "needs" a bike unless you are using it to get to work. If you live in Arizona and want to ride a fat bike, have at it. It is just a mountain bike with big tires.

    It's always hard to get a feel for someone's tone on a forum. Chances are that everyone with a different opinion on this thread would get along just fine on a group ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post

    And I can't believe people actually get pissed about this stuff.
    People get annoyed when someone basically comes in and says "Your bikes were a waste of money, the fun you have is stupid, fatbikes aren't any different than other bikes and you are all buying into a trend." With the attitude that we should all just listen to you and have no hard feelings about it is ignorant at best. Who give two ****s about what you think? Of course it is a trend, everything is trendy. Why do mountain bikes even exist? Someone got into Gary Fisher's, Ritchey's, Breeze's etc trends of doing something relatively stupid and a bunch of people copied it.

    You think fatbikes are just rigid bikes with big tires. Great, piss off. Seriously. Your opinion has been heard and you are just here to be an arrogant ass and argue with everyone about it. So what if cargo bikes are the new fixed gear. Oh I bet you thought fatbikes were the new fixed gear. Fat bikes are the new rigid SS, but who cares if they are? Products that we use are an evolution of our thought process, needs, and desires. People like you stifle innovation and new ideas because you just have to peg something as a trend so you can be on the right and wrong side of a trend.

    People put road bike wheels on a mountain bike and called it a 29er.
    People put knobby tires on touring bikes and called it cyclocross.
    People pit knobby tires on cruiser bikes and called it a mountain bike.
    Noticing a trend?

    The only difference is that some trendy things stay around and even get niches within their niches. Of course these are all just bikes. You don't NEED any of these bikes and if they were for transportation almost all of them would be completely terrible. A fatbike lets me ride where my 29er can't, period. You think "well he probably only rides it on snow on the road" Wrong and even if you were right, the fatbike still does that better too.

    You are trying to articulate fatbiking into a definition as if DH, XC, AM, Enduro, Trail, etc aren't all under the umbrella of "mountain biking". If I had to put my finger on it, Fatbiking is somewhere around rigid XC bike with big ass tires.

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    What disturbs me that people have the nerve to *opine* on a subject (not just fat-bikes) when they have no ACTUAL EXPERIENCE with ... just on their feelings or what they think. And they continue to argue their point with those who DO have the experience. IMO .. that is just ignorant.

    I really like my Pugsley. It gives me a completely different ride in snow & icy conditions which I feel more confident and safer that I would not attempt with my road bikes (one is on a trainer) but my fat-bike gets me outside. When the streets are clear, I just roll right over the pot holes .. lol

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    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! This forum isn't any different from any other outdoor oriented forum where the members represent a wide spectrum of the various levels and niches of the sport.
    I have found similar arguments on fly fishing and sport fishing forums, some surfing forums, and some kayaking/paddling forums. I usually just skip reading the stuff that degenerates into ego battles...with each participant defending their own point of view to the very last... Ha! One element that is never lacking on any internet forums is "opinion." I just try to mine it and attempt to sort out the gems.

    My new fat bike is going to open up a lot of cycling turf for me, and allow me to ride more often in my local area.

    I came here to learn.

  61. #61
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    Re: Fat is a state of mind.

    Someone needs to figure out the correlation between fatbiking and insecurity.

  62. #62
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    Fat is a state of mind.

    Maybe the correlation is something like the guys who drive lifted trucks with 44" Boggers on it (yup, that was me). I was, and still am making up for deficiencies elsewhere.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    Someone needs to figure out the correlation between fatbiking and insecurity.
    Well then, I'm just going to have to refer to it as "beach riding." Or, "Laters, man, I gotta go burn some fat!"

  64. #64
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    ...I do have a short tale about insecurity. Of the rubber bicycle tire kind.

    One of my motivations for initially getting a fat bike was to see if it could solve a particular type of crash that knocked me out: on sand, at speed (26 mph), around a corner. I was young and foolish, and got pretty messed up.

    Long term answer after a couple summers of fat bike testing? Nope. Fluid particle physics just don't give a sh!t at that speed. I think it's called "shear" or something. There is no answer to this problem other than to adjust my riding habits. Do not speed around blind, sandy corners. Check.

    Upon re-reading FNFAL's initial post, all I really see is a snowy bike that looks like it had hours of fun. Hooray! There's no good way of telling what and how much you rode through, other than there's dirt mixed with snow on your down tube. The notion that you rode through a deep snow drift is irrelevant, no bike can cut through or float on top of one of those if they are long enough. What were the majority of the ride's conditions like? 1" deep? 3" deep? Is it a good, convincing post that argues the merits of avoiding purchasing a fat bike?

    No.

    Look at your boot. Then look at your fat tire. Put them both in some snow. The displacement is pretty similar.

    Look at your boot. Then look at your 2" wide tire. The displacement is not close. No contest.

    Look at a snow shoe. A tire equivalent does not exist, and if you refer to the Hanebrink, try again. Someone needs to make a 36" by 18" ultra light rubberized non pneumatic wheel. If no one else does, I will.

    So: if you can easily walk on say 3" deep snow, you can easily fat tire ride that same snow. If you have to exert effort to walk in deeper snow, there isn't a bike that will easily ride it while piloted by Some Guy.

    So? Going for a snow ride and then posting pics of your snowy bike while claiming that you were faster than some guy on a fat bike - it doesn't say much. If I was that some-guy, you'd probably spank me, fat or not.

    Fat bikes mean you can ride snow a few inches deeper. That is the most logical statement I can come up with. There's no state-of-mind to it at all. Been riding on snow well before fatties existed.

    If you can get by with less equipment, then more power to you for being economically efficient. Don't try to shame me for pursuing the path of overkill, because I'm trying to cope with adverse conditions and my obviously inferior handling skills. In calling my fun stupid, you call my coping strategy stupid. For that I can only respond with two middle fingers. I'd give you more but I only have two hands. If you want to just claim that fat bikers are inferior riders who can't handle winter on their own, then commit to it.

    The wobbly ass handling (and erratic lines left in the snow) that I see regular working stiffs commuting on in Minneapolis tells me that fat bikes have a place. Maybe not in your garage, but definitely in mine.

    I could throw on some dress shoes and walk on the portion of my lawn that has accumulated rock hard snow on account of sintering, and say that boots are unnecessary? You would balk at the suggestion, and you should balk at the suggestion. Does that mean you're insecure, sensitive, or whatever?

    No, it means you grok that such a claim is BS. You do not grok. Go ride a fat bike in a variety of conditions, and then you will. The financial barrier to doing that? Totally understandable.

    You want insecure? Some reading this might be familiar the notion that I built a few bikes frames by hand out of bizarre materials. Why? Because I was insecure in my career (software), feeling like I pigeon holed myself into a job that wasn't future proof, and what the HELL was I going to do 15 years from now when my job evaporates? I had to do something to get out of my comfort zone, WAY out.

    In that process of evaluating myself to see if I have the guts to try something difficult and unfamiliar, each discouragement encountered was like trying to eat an icicle in one swallow. Jarring, unnerving.

    At the "end" (there is no end), I rediscovered something about myself, the love of experimentation for experimentation's sake. How I grew as a person was the ability to experiment without becoming emotionally involved in the experiment. That's how I was when I was younger, outcomes of experiments affected me too vividely.

    My point is not to share a whine, it is this: fat bikes are an experiment. A large, capitalistic, social experiment. To say they are unnecessary when the experiment has not been concluded? When you haven't ridden one? In other words, when you aren't yet fully involved in said experiment, but are willing to criticize it?

    Do you understand how foolish that looks?

    Consider your words. You are catching some people in the middle of their experiment. Get involved. Otherwise, shut it.

    That is a whole bunch of explanation on how we, in fact, do not have our panties in a bunch.

    EDITED because that last part was not necessary, sorry.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  65. #65
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    Dang, how did I miss this fun cluster????????!!!!!!!!!

    All I can add at this late date (since it's been said, ad (double) nauseum) is, if you don't have a Lefty on your fatbike, you're doing it wrong, not fatbiking, and should be ridiculed until reduced to a sniveling puddle of goo in the corner.

    Nah, just kidding. Get out and ride your damn bike, I don't care what it is, as long as you're on it, smiling, and not being a douche to me or my pals.

    It's arrogant, Strava obsessed roadies suffering in their pain caves all winter long, telling everyone else they are inferior and doing it wrong, that really bunches my knickers.....

    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  66. #66
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    Is this fatbiking? Am I doing it right?

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post

    Consider your words. You are catching some people in the middle of their experiment. Get involved. Otherwise, shut it.

    That is a whole bunch of explanation on how we, in fact, do not have our panties in a bunch.
    Thank you, Drew Diller, for taking time to articulate this. I could not agree with you more. I admire your ability (once again) to cut through the verbal crap that occasionally clogs our little corner of mtbr.

    FNFAL's post irked me primarily because he implied that the benefits of extra fat-tired mountain bikes on soft surfaces like snow were imaginary (state of mind) based on, apparently, one ride. One ride can teach you quite a bit, but you need many rides in a variety of conditions to truly appreciate the benefits and limitations of 3.8 inch and larger tires. FNFAL doesn't know enough to know how little he knows. Fueling my irkedness was my experience with FNFAL on an unrelated topic in another forum, which I won't go into here. Let's just say I am not inclined to trust his intentions. As others here have mentioned, the growing popularity extra fat-tired mountain bikes have made them the "flavor of the month". In this era of irony, their trendiness has spurred the inevitable backlash, where it's now cool to resist or denigrate what the masses (laughable since this is still an ultra niche) consider cool or trendy.

    For the record, none of the extra fat-tired bikers I know care what anyone one else rides. We exercise the freedom to choose between extra fat, mid-fat or non-fat bikes depending on preference, conditions and or a momentary whim. Most of the folks who regularly visit this forum seem to be similarly pragmatic and hardly cult-like. If I were to live outside Alaska, I would seriously question whether to even have an extra fat-tired bike in the stable. It would depend on winter snowfall and the proximity of beaches or dunes. I like bikes, and I like bicycling. Extra fat-tired bikes are a tool, nothing more, nothing less. A tool that allows me to do what I like to do in a place where winter rules eight months of the year. Oh, and we have a lot of beaches, too.
    Vini vidi velo!

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    ...If I were to live outside Alaska, I would seriously question whether to even have an extra fat-tired bike in the stable. ... Extra fat-tired bikes are a tool, nothing more, nothing less. A tool that allows me to do what I like to do in a place where winter rules eight months of the year. Oh, and we have a lot of beaches, too.
    I suspect a lot of the anti fatbike verbal diahorrea is emanating from folk who have bought a fatbike and who haven't actually found a use for it.

    Nothing else but hike-a-bike will do the same job, and even then the fatbike isn't a magic bullet for all conditions. It does tend to become the preferred mount though - even for straightforward trail work - because of its comfort and traction.

    On trend folk who see themselves as speedy xc trailpark heroes are going to be disappointed with fatbikes, but their problem is with themselves, not the tool.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I suspect a lot of the anti fatbike verbal diahorrea is emanating from folk who have bought a fatbike and who haven't actually found a use for it.
    I disagree with this. I think a lot of diarrhea is from people that don't have a fat bike, and they are afraid to admit that they want one.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    I disagree with this. I think a lot of diarrhea is from people that don't have a fat bike, and they are afraid to admit that they want one.
    Yep. And there's a fair number of people who just think that fatbikes look ridiculous. Shrug.
    Personally, I enjoy arguing with people on the internet. If you want to poke me in the eye by calling me a poser or bandwagoneer or whatever, expect to get poked back. Neither my feelings or my butt gets hurt from this.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Personally, I enjoy arguing with people on the internet.
    One of the tenants of is logic. If you can't use logic, then you are just a shit spewing moron. And this entire post started with a lack of logic.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Thank you, Drew Diller, for taking time to articulate this. I could not agree with you more. I admire your ability (once again) to cut through the verbal crap that occasionally clogs our little corner of mtbr.

    FNFAL's post irked me primarily because he implied that the benefits of extra fat-tired mountain bikes on soft surfaces like snow were imaginary (state of mind) based on, apparently, one ride. One ride can teach you quite a bit, but you need many rides in a variety of conditions to truly appreciate the benefits and limitations of 3.8 inch and larger tires. FNFAL doesn't know enough to know how little he knows. Fueling my irkedness was my experience with FNFAL on an unrelated topic in another forum, which I won't go into here. Let's just say I am not inclined to trust his intentions. As others here have mentioned, the growing popularity extra fat-tired mountain bikes have made them the "flavor of the month". In this era of irony, their trendiness has spurred the inevitable backlash, where it's now cool to resist or denigrate what the masses (laughable since this is still an ultra niche) consider cool or trendy.

    For the record, none of the extra fat-tired bikers I know care what anyone one else rides. We exercise the freedom to choose between extra fat, mid-fat or non-fat bikes depending on preference, conditions and or a momentary whim. Most of the folks who regularly visit this forum seem to be similarly pragmatic and hardly cult-like. If I were to live outside Alaska, I would seriously question whether to even have an extra fat-tired bike in the stable. It would depend on winter snowfall and the proximity of beaches or dunes. I like bikes, and I like bicycling. Extra fat-tired bikes are a tool, nothing more, nothing less. A tool that allows me to do what I like to do in a place where winter rules eight months of the year. Oh, and we have a lot of beaches, too.
    Only here do I disagree. I think for most on this forum they are a toy, not so much as a tool. I know I could live without one and get by with my 29'er (maybe have to ride a little less on more typical winters for SE Mich. This year has record snow falls) But, I would be missing out on a lot of fun that my fat-bike offers that I can't do on my 29'er. I don't NEED to get out and ride, but my life is more enriched doing so. How I appreciate the last day that I rode my Pugs, because the next day I went down HARD on black ice that wasn't visible and fractured my pelvis 1/14/14. I am currently healing and waiting for the day that I can get back on and ride. Being stuck in the house on crutches is about as painful as dealing with the fracture/trauma. My first time back out I will be certain to go with friends and I plan on having a DAMNED GOOD time.

  73. #73
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    I learn so much here! But the most important thing I have learned is that I have been living my life the correct way! My way, doing what I like with who I like, not worrying about what anyone else thinks of my choices or participations in any activities! So with that, I embrace my fellow Fat Bike riders and I give the scoffers and the negative spreading creeps the one finger salute! I don't need you nor do I recognize any relevance in Your retort. You may be interrupting this forum, or to some helping to creat conversation but to me you do not exist!

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    All I can add at this late date (since it's been said, ad (double) nauseum) is, if you don't have a Lefty on your fatbike, you're doing it wrong, not fatbiking, and should be ridiculed until reduced to a sniveling puddle of goo in the corner.
    Hmmm, is riding rigid a state of mind? If I'm jumping on a bandwagon at all, it's the one where rigid MTBs are cool again, which I don't expect will last when fatties go hardtail. So I put off other expenditures to build a proper, rigid fatty now, while I still can!

    Denver Broncos: 101-3 since 1975 when scoring 30+ at home.

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  75. #75
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    Kris, I remember reading about your injury. That sucks! Healing vibes your way. I've fallen on ice half a dozen times this year, due to our weird "warm" weather. Freeze-thaw cycles have been crazy. I have escaped serious injury like yours by sheer luck. Back in 1991, I broke my hip and femur in a car accident. I was riding again with six months and fully recovered about two years later. I'm 57 now and hardly even think about my injury. I can bike, hike, ski... do pretty much anything I want to do. I've slowed with age, but most of my limitations are self-imposed: lack of training, sketchy nutrition, etc. Nothing to add or take issue with in your post, just wanted to wish you a speedy recovery. Cheers, vb
    Vini vidi velo!

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