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Thread: fat recumbent!

  1. #1
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    fat recumbent!

    This will be my next bike!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails fat recumbent!-bigfoot_2xl_seat_frame.jpg  


  2. #2
    Deroymac
    Reputation: Spoon Farmer's Avatar
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    Cool bike! I just received my first fat bike, a Moonlander and have owned a Carbent recumbent for over five years. I was recently thinking how great it would be to have a Fat Bent!

  3. #3
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    Ya'll sick in the head
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  4. #4
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    Carbent, I just test rode my first bent a couple of weeks ago and it was great!!

  5. #5
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    Lightfoot Cycles "Bigfoot"! Looked at their offerings, very heavily considered the ATC Quad and settled on a Pugsley. Best Wishes on your new to-be ride!

  6. #6
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    I cant believe there hasnt been anymore input than this! Come on lets hear some opinions! Good or bad.

  7. #7
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    I guess if you like recumbents, then great. Otherwise... meh.
    Not many folks, especially mountain bikers it seems, get very excited about recumbents. Personally, I never got the point of them.

  8. #8
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    My opinion is that this bike would be great for leisure and light trail riding but would take some getting used to for much more than that. Would love to try it out for awhile just for fun though!

    Bigfoot - Mountain to River - YouTube

    Bigfoot - All Terrain Bike - YouTube

    The ATC is still my favorite of their offerings!

    ATC All Terrain Cycle - YouTube

  9. #9
    Recovering couch patato
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    Ive been thinking of a fat quad (skelter really) for a while. Surely its been done before, but I see potential.
    Front BFLs of course.
    Double rear tires preferably, more nice options now that 29+ is coming (search for Surly Krampus).
    eDrive optionally. Differential on rear axle, maybe. Suspension under the seat, stiff chassis. Roll bar. Maybe.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  10. #10
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    That is my next bike. I ordered it from Angletech about a month ago. The frame is in the build queue over at Lightfoot. It will have an Alfine 11 hub and 22-32 chain rings. Custom painted Lazer Cranberry with Daryl cutout rims and Larry tires.

    Advantages of a recumbent? Let's start with no carpel tunnel, no pain in the wrists, hands and no numb fingers. No need to hyper-extend the neck to see where you are going. And best of all - no saddle sores, no compression of the perineal nerve i.e. no ED problems whatsoever.

    The semi-reclined position allows for a larger distribution of the body weight over the butt and back. You finish a ride refreshed instead of hunched over and bow-legged. I can ride a lot longer on a recumbent. I feel I'm limited by time constraints, sun exposure and hydration rather than reaching my pain threshold.

    The Bigfoot will be difficult to endo but prone to washing out the front wheel. It will likely have some difficulties in technical terrain. I'll have to wait and see what its limitations are out on the trail.
    Lightfoot Bigfoot fat-tire (The Mule)
    RANS F5 Pro 700c (Firefly)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tandem42 View Post
    That is my next bike. I ordered it from Angletech about a month ago. The frame is in the build queue over at Lightfoot. It will have an Alfine 11 hub and 22-32 chain rings. Custom painted Lazer Cranberry with Daryl cutout rims and Larry tires.

    Advantages of a recumbent? Let's start with no carpel tunnel, no pain in the wrists, hands and no numb fingers. No need to hyper-extend the neck to see where you are going. And best of all - no saddle sores, no compression of the perineal nerve i.e. no ED problems whatsoever.

    The semi-reclined position allows for a larger distribution of the body weight over the butt and back. You finish a ride refreshed instead of hunched over and bow-legged. I can ride a lot longer on a recumbent. I feel I'm limited by time constraints, sun exposure and hydration rather than reaching my pain threshold.

    The Bigfoot will be difficult to endo but prone to washing out the front wheel. It will likely have some difficulties in technical terrain. I'll have to wait and see what its limitations are out on the trail.
    Yeah, I've heard all that before. And if it works for you, that's great. I guess I should have said, I don't see the point, for me. Seems like it would be really hard to climb hills on one. And if you're on bumpy terrain, which I ride 95% of the time, there's no way to stand up and give your ass a rest, and let your legs cushion the blows... even if it is cushioned by a lounge chair and fat tires.
    Not to diss your next bike or rain on your parade, I'm just trying to explain the lack of response to the thread. Recumbents don't excite many folks, that's all. Nothing personal.
    I'm all for goofy bikes!

  12. #12
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    I was once looking for a Fat recumbent, but was concerned that the videos show the rider almost always having to work to steer, almost to the point of having difficulty. I'm led to suspect that they haven't got the trail optimum, nor anywhere near. Or it may be the angle and the resulting/required steering movements required.
    Hope it's just that the rider in the video doesn't have enough time on it.

  13. #13
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    Got mine 2 winters ago.

    I put a Schlumph mountain drive and 11-34 cassette for hill climbing. Its a fun bike.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1127971...24044124987058

    And I put 29er wheels on it for summer.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1127971...TAhua6hZSo1gE#

    andy
    Last edited by andysinak; 07-22-2012 at 11:00 PM. Reason: typo

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    Yeah, I've heard all that before. And if it works for you, that's great. I guess I should have said, I don't see the point, for me. Seems like it would be really hard to climb hills on one. And if you're on bumpy terrain, which I ride 95% of the time, there's no way to stand up and give your ass a rest, and let your legs cushion the blows... even if it is cushioned by a lounge chair and fat tires.
    Not to diss your next bike or rain on your parade, I'm just trying to explain the lack of response to the thread. Recumbents don't excite many folks, that's all. Nothing personal.
    I'm all for goofy bikes!
    I agree with everything you said. This bike is not for everyone and not meant to replace the traditional upright mountain bike. In fact, I still have an FS 29er on my wish list for next year.

    It will definitely be a slow, leisurely ride. It won't be a good bike for clearing rugged terrain at speed. You won't win any races with it.

    I don't know about you, but I tend to get tunnel vision when I'm on an upright mountain bike. I miss a lot of things that are happening all around me. A few weeks ago I passed a group of turkeys with their young a few feet off the trail. As I approached a hiker further down the trail, he pointed in their direction and I was able to stop and turn to see them. I couldn't believe how I could have passed right by without seeing them the first time. I notice more of my surroundings on a recumbent because I don't have to lift my head to look around.

    No bike does everything well. My dual 700c F5 high racer recumbent is a dream machine out on the open road, but in the inner city with stoplights every block, not so much fun. The Bigfoot will be a blast to ride on twisting, flowing trails through the forest. Perfect for those days when you just want to get out and enjoy nature and not be in a hurry to get anywhere.
    Lightfoot Bigfoot fat-tire (The Mule)
    RANS F5 Pro 700c (Firefly)

  15. #15
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    I hear you man. I appreciate nature as much (maybe more) than the next guy, but when I'm mountain biking, the focus is almost entirely on riding (partly because my local trails are rooty and rocky, and I'm riding a 26er rigid with a super steep head angle). If I want to check out nature (which I frequently do, I'm either on foot or in my canoe.
    Then again, maybe I take my nature for granted when I'm out riding, because I see so much of it at other times too...

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