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  1. #1
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
    Reputation: donalson's Avatar
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    fat front bikes and rim width?

    I'm looking to build up a fat front XC/Trail bike here soon... I always thought the fat front would be perfect for our trails so I'm finally going to jump in

    for building it up i'm a little confused... it seems that for float you want as wide of a rim as you want... but on fat front bikes i'm seeing a lot of the fat front guys (including jeff jones bikes) are only going with a 50mm up front...

    what am I missing?... i'm considering a big fat sheba just to try it out (price is nice) but i'm wondering if I should find something narrower like a trials rims?

    any thoughts or observations?
    thanks
    mark
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  2. #2
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    I used a 40mm rim for my half fat. It's a compromise that allowed me to use the fat tyre in a normal fork I had. The actual width of the tyre is less than you'd get on a proper fat rim, but it's much fatter than any other tyre you can get.

    One possible advantage - narrow rims are lighter.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
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    I use the 70mm rim from Jeff Jones, which I'm pretty sure is actually and Speedway Uma. I've not tried a narrower rim but expect it would feel similar, then again the weight difference is relatively small so why not go wider?...If I was doing it again I think a 65mm Marge Lite would be top of the list to try.


  4. #4
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I used a 40mm rim for my half fat. It's a compromise that allowed me to use the fat tyre in a normal fork I had. The actual width of the tyre is less than you'd get on a proper fat rim, but it's much fatter than any other tyre you can get.

    One possible advantage - narrow rims are lighter.
    what fork are you using?

    i'm going for the extra cushion from the fat tire... I enjoy the simplicity of rigid but there are some rooty parts of the trail that made me a bit nervous and feel a little out of control while running rigid if I went to fast though there... that all went away with a suspension fork but I don't need the big hit plushness of a suspension fork around here me thinks

    ishouldbeworking how much was the fork/wheel combo from Jeff?... any plans on moving to a jones frame down the road?...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  5. #5
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    from memory it was around $500 for the wheel and $250 for the fork, the Jones fork is very short so it only really works on a 26" bike like my Cotic above, or a none suspension corrected 29er like the Ragley TD:1 I'm building.

    I like the idea of a Jones, but a ti version is a bit much for me right now, and the steel frames seem to have a few two many comprimises for me at least. Maybe one day....

  6. #6
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    I'd pass on the fat sheba if at all possible. Put that money towards something narrower and lighter.
    You won't regret it a year from now. I went from a Rolling Darryl to a Marge Lite.

  7. #7
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    Working on a fat front build right now using the Salsa Enabler fork, Fat Sheba rim, and Larry tire. Still working on collecting parts and wondering what you ended up doing?

  8. #8
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    To my mind, the fat front bike has to be thought of differently than a full fat bike. The floatation you want with a full fat bike is to get you over really soft surfaces: snow, sand, mud bogs. To me, a fat front bike is a trail fun bike. The wide rims and fat tire allow me to barge through/over roots with a rigid fork. Floatation is not part of the equation. I think that's why a lot of fat front bikes are 50mm. I would like to have the Marge lite myself, just to save weight. RIght now I have the Jones 50mm rim, 1150 gram Husker Du, and a 250ish gram qtube. Can't get much lighter a fat front.

  9. #9
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    To me, a fat front bike is a trail fun bike. The wide rims and fat tire allow me to barge through/over roots with a rigid fork. Floatation is not part of the equation. I think that's why a lot of fat front bikes are 50mm. I would like to have the Marge lite myself, just to save weight. RIght now I have the Jones 50mm rim, 1150 gram Husker Du, and a 250ish gram qtube. Can't get much lighter a fat f
    ront.

    +1 on this. Marge lite, q-tube, and Nate on the front of my Kona unit (enabler fork), having a blast with this setup singlespeeding on the dry trails. Looking down at that big old nate gobbling up the trail is confidence inspiring, and the marge lite was a very easy wheel to lace up (and I'm no expert).

  10. #10
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    I am running a cutout rolling daryl, specialized tube and a Husker du on my fat front Jones. Just alot of fun on the trails

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