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Thread: Fat Florida

  1. #1
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    Fat Florida

    Nice ride the other day. Cool temps (50's) and a lot of wildlife. Saw a bunch of gators, dear, hogs, rat snake, armadillos and tons of water birds. The blue Fatback was ridden by a friend of mine and that was his first trip on a fatbike, I think he is sold especially when we had a 1/2 mile stretch of sugar sand to ride through. We also rode through the hammock that you can barely make out in the bridge shot. We were riding through 6" - 12" of water and slippery mud and the fat tires are just so good. Could have used more traction in the rear on the mud as is spun a lot so may have to try a Larry on the rear and not just the front.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat Florida-fat-bikes-2.jpg  

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  2. #2
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    Hay where is the snow?

    Love the jones on the front. I wanted to try that.
    2013 mongoose Fat bike
    2012 Moonlander.

    http://undergroundvelo.proboards.com/

  3. #3
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    Snow? What is that!

    The Jones fork works great, light and stiff.

  4. #4
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    Great photos, what kind of terrain/trails were you riding? Wet stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by jfkbike2
    Saw a bunch of gators, dear...
    That's wonderful, honey.
    I'm covered in beer.

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    Nice mittens, gotta keep those digits warm in that brutal 50 degree weather

    Sweet set of bikes you've got there. Great pics too.

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    Whoops...

    Terrain was mostly flat, dirt trails, fire breaks etc... The hammock is a slough, aptly named deer slough and the parts that had water were fairly shallow that day but in the summer will be 3 - 4 feet deep. Riding is not technical but it is close to home and has a lot to see if you know where to look.

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    Yeah the mittens were a little over kill but he likes them so what the heck...and it was probably 45 when we started!

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    I thought that bridge picture looked kind of familiar...

    This was before the kids had actual mountain bikes and we had to pretty much stick to the powerline road. Now they can venture a little further out without getting beaten to death.

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    Where in the state are you?

  10. #10
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    I looked at a few ariels on the Sarasota Wateratlas site, seems like a cool area. I'm in a sandy, swampy part of the world a couple-thousand miles north of you. What kind of hogs did you see? Feral? Wild?
    I'm covered in beer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbwill
    I thought that bridge picture looked kind of familiar...

    This was before the kids had actual mountain bikes and we had to pretty much stick to the powerline road. Now they can venture a little further out without getting beaten to death.

    Beaten? Or eaten?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike
    Beaten? Or eaten?
    Depends on the day! The girl ran over a pygmy rattlesnake on the same road, and they both have been within a couple of feet of gator nests without realizing it until I pointed them out.

    When it's not the wildlife hunting them down, they get beaten up by bouncing around over the palmetto (stumps? roots? rhizomes?) that are worse than any rooty section of singletrack you've ever seen. I expect them to be pretty well toughened up by the time they get out of elementary school :-)

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    This is Venice and the area is the Carlton reserve. the hogs are Feral Hogs I believe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbwill
    I thought that bridge picture looked kind of familiar...

    This was before the kids had actual mountain bikes and we had to pretty much stick to the powerline road. Now they can venture a little further out without getting beaten to death.
    That's the spot.

    Have you ever hiked (no bikes allowed) to Deep Hole on the southern end of Lower Myakka Lake? Was there a few weeks ago and we counted 83 gators on the bank at one time. Roseate Spoonbills by the dozens as well, really cool to see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfkbike2
    That's the spot.

    Have you ever hiked (no bikes allowed) to Deep Hole on the southern end of Lower Myakka Lake? Was there a few weeks ago and we counted 83 gators on the bank at one time. Roseate Spoonbills by the dozens as well, really cool to see.
    I've been there by canoe but not on land. If there are that many on the bank I think I'd RATHER be in the canoe!

    When northern visitors come down for the first time I like to take them to the north lake in a canoe. "See that gator off to your right?" I say. "Where?" they reply, shading their eyes with one hand and peering off in the distance. "Not out there," I say, "right THERE" and point out with the paddle the one about a canoe length away. That moment of indecision when they can't decide whether to jump out of the boat, stay in the boat, or sprout wings and fly is priceless!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbwill
    I've been there by canoe but not on land. If there are that many on the bank I think I'd RATHER be in the canoe!

    When northern visitors come down for the first time I like to take them to the north lake in a canoe. "See that gator off to your right?" I say. "Where?" they reply, shading their eyes with one hand and peering off in the distance. "Not out there," I say, "right THERE" and point out with the paddle the one about a canoe length away. That moment of indecision when they can't decide whether to jump out of the boat, stay in the boat, or sprout wings and fly is priceless!
    Nah... When you get about 15 feet away from them they all hit the water like crazy. They are real skittish around people.

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    Awesome! Thanks for sharing.

    I am going to be in the area in March. I will look in that area for rides. Last year I rode Oscar Scherer State Park... It was okay but the "Sugar sand was a nightmare for my cyclocross bike I took last year. This year I am bringing my Pugsley.

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    Quote Originally Posted by surlyoldman
    Awesome! Thanks for sharing.

    I am going to be in the area in March. I will look in that area for rides. Last year I rode Oscar Scherer State Park... It was okay but the "Sugar sand was a nightmare for my cyclocross bike I took last year. This year I am bringing my Pugsley.
    Carlton has some sugar sand as well but not as much. Let me know if you need any more local info.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfkbike2
    Nah... When you get about 15 feet away from them they all hit the water like crazy. They are real skittish around people.
    Gotta be careful, I think they may adapt - when I was 12ish I was fishing off my uncle's back porch, I saw one 50 feet or so across the channel and so after I caught a small fish, I left it on the hook and cast it right at him, bonking him right on the nose. He took the fish and I then proceeded to reel him in and he just let himself be pulled all the way across and right up to the dock. We both sat there staring at each other for a minute, just sort of sizing each other up (fascinating!), and at that point my uncle stepped outside, saw that I was at that point only a few feet away from him, grabbed me and ran inside, telling me that same gator ("Charlie" the neighborhood local gator) had apparently eaten local dogs before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimInSF
    Gotta be careful, I think they may adapt - when I was 12ish I was fishing off my uncle's back porch, I saw one 50 feet or so across the channel and so after I caught a small fish, I left it on the hook and cast it right at him, bonking him right on the nose. He took the fish and I then proceeded to reel him in and he just let himself be pulled all the way across and right up to the dock. We both sat there staring at each other for a minute, just sort of sizing each other up (fascinating!), and at that point my uncle stepped outside, saw that I was at that point only a few feet away from him, grabbed me and ran inside, telling me that same gator ("Charlie" the neighborhood local gator) had apparently eaten local dogs before.
    If they are in a neighborhood, or around people who may or may not be feeding them then you are correct. All Gators seem to like dogs and cats. But true wild gators are very wary of humans. Does not mean you can get stupid around them but show them proper respect and if there are babies or if the gator is hurt / sick then stay away. We used to live in a development that had one named Hector. He was a good 13' long, he became way too comfortable around people and they finally had to remove him. All the snow birds loved to feed him marshmallow, which they love and that made him loose his fear of people. Also it probably turned him into shoes and handbags...

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