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  1. #1
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    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?

    Hi everybody,

    I have ridden fat bikes just on snow and i loved it
    I never tried to ride them on sand and i wanted to know if it's as good as on snow.
    I found this video and it seems pretty amazing, but is just the guy really good or is it quite easy?

    Charge Cooker Fat Tires | Superble

    Thanks

    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?-p1030900.jpg
    Last edited by dario8888; 10-22-2013 at 12:47 AM. Reason: add an image

  2. #2
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    Where do you suggest to go sand riding (a good place with high dunes)? some good places in Europe or in the US!

  3. #3
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    I am building a fatbike, and one of my goals is to be able to ride sand. Most everyone seems to be into the snow capabilities but I have always ridden regular MTB all winter long anyway. I have not yet found an ultimate sand tire yet, so I am just going Bud and Lou till somebody makes one. My experience with sand motorized vehicles is fatter is better. Those spider treads always look cool to me. There are many sand dunes/beaches along Lake Michigan, my home.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dario8888 View Post
    Hi everybody,

    I have ridden fat bikes just on snow and i loved it
    I never tried to ride them on sand and i wanted to know if it's as good as on snow.
    I found this video and it seems pretty amazing, but is just the guy really good or is it quite easy?

    Charge Cooker Fat Tires | Superble

    Thanks
    Well, first of all, this guy never pedals through the entire video. He's always going downhill! I'd like to see him bust a lung and see him actually do some work.

    As for myself, I've only had my fat bike for about a month now, and I've ridden along the sandy beaches but still not in snow. If you stay near the water, it can be pretty fast. If you go up into the soft dunes...yeah, you'll get a great workout!

    Edit: My 4.7" BFL tires seems to work great in sand.
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  5. #5
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    Great on sand, more fun on snow. Don't get me started on mud..

    two wheel livin'..

  6. #6
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    Yeah for me it's the same, I am building a new fatbike and i want one to go either on snow and sand!An italian friend of mine has a Charge Cooker with Fat Tires (With Surly 4" tires) but Vee Rubber tires seem pretty good for sand and snow as well..First bike is with Vee Rubber, second with Surly, which one do you think are better?

    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?-charge-cooker-maxi.jpg

    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?-casali_fat-tires.jpg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by marathon marke View Post
    Well, first of all, this guy never pedals through the entire video. He's always going downhill! I'd like to see him bust a lung and see him actually do some work...
    I agree. Just about any bike can look good going downhill, especially with a skilled rider.

    Yet to get to where you downhill from you have to climb there, and climbing is probably 80-90% of your ride time if you're in the hills.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  8. #8
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    Can i believe them or is just a commercial thing??

    Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike 2014 | Leisure Lakes Bikes

    "The Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike 2014 is designed to take you anywhere, in any conditions. This hardtail mountain bike takes the ‘fat bike’ feel to the trails for a new off road experience.
    If you want to ride anywhere and everywhere all year around then the Charge Maxi is the fat bike for you; hit the beach in deep sand and the trails when the snow falls hard and eat up the elements with the massive 4" wide tyres!"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dario8888 View Post
    Can i believe them or is just a commercial thing??

    Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike 2014 | Leisure Lakes Bikes

    "The Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike 2014 is designed to take you anywhere, in any conditions. This hardtail mountain bike takes the ‘fat bike’ feel to the trails for a new off road experience.
    If you want to ride anywhere and everywhere all year around then the Charge Maxi is the fat bike for you; hit the beach in deep sand and the trails when the snow falls hard and eat up the elements with the massive 4" wide tyres!"
    Bah humbug! Not as good as Bikes Direct whose fatbike lets you "Float over soft powder snow or deep sugar sand and laugh!"
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post

    Yet to get to where you downhill from you have to climb there, and climbing is probably 80-90% of your ride time if you're in the hills.
    That's my point.
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  11. #11
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    Yeah I bet it's not easy to go up the dunes!I don't think there is anything you can do about it though? (easy to show just the fun part in videos)

  12. #12
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    two wheel livin'..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Bah humbug! Not as good as Bikes Direct whose fatbike lets you "Float over soft powder snow or deep sugar sand and laugh!"
    Probably the only true part is that I laugh!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    I agree. Just about any bike can look good going downhill, especially with a skilled rider.

    Yet to get to where you downhill from you have to climb there, and climbing is probably 80-90% of your ride time if you're in the hills.
    Do you think there is any tire or device that helps climbing dunes?
    p.s. after a hard work the good part is even better!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dario8888 View Post
    Do you think there is any tire or device that helps climbing dunes?
    p.s. after a hard work the good part is even better!
    Dreams
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?-fatsand.jpg  


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    Dario; probably one of the best people to learn about sand dunes on this forum would be Ward. He also has done some experimentation with 'forming' his own tire treads for the sand, which is worth a look.

    Find one of his posts...click on his name and do a search through his threads and posts. He also has a site where he lists many of his films: wardeproductions. if I recall correctly.

    Look for films about riding on the Oregon dunes...there are several to be found.

    Last of all, do not neglect looking at films by CoastKid and others from the UK.
    Just like Fat Bikes...the posters on here can go anywhere...and do.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by k.b. View Post
    Dreams
    I think k.b. has aced it
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  18. #18
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    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?

    I ride on super soft ocean sand all the time. I have a Moonlander and have used BFL's as well as Bud & Lou. Both work well but BFL is best. Consensus around here is BFL on 100mm rims is best setup. The lower the tire psi the better.

    Riding on sand can go from challenging to moderately easy. A LOT of it depends on sand conditions which change daily with the tides. Also wind speed and direction are very important. I find readjusting my mindset about speed has to be readjusted way down from trails riding. For longer beach rides better to not have a time agenda, pack a snack or lunch, and just take it as it comes.

    In general my Moonie is great on the beach. I tell people that the big tires make it possible but not easy. Again really depends on conditions. Sometimes I'm doing 3-4 mph in lowest 3 gears and others I'm flying along at 8-12.

    Don't plan on climbing in the sand at all. It's amazing how the bike will be cruising along and all of a sudden break traction on even a modest incline. Same thing happens if you try and stand and put some power down...instant spin and sink at rear tire. Forget about climbing dunes.

    This is all at slower speeds where power through the pedals is needed. If you can build up some speed beforehand you can definitely charge some smaller dunes where you carry momentum up the face. I've done that and it's a blast. But don't expect to power up anything in a low gear.

    I'd love to see a "paddle" tire for deep sand/beach riding. Same as Moto uses for dune riding. However, I think that would be an even smaller sliver of an already small market. Plus you wouldn't want want to ride a paddle tire to the beach on a dry trail or pavement. Obviously wouldn't roll well plus would significantly reduce the lifespan of what I'm sure would be an expensive tire. Having said that, I would buy one. You only need 1 for the rear.

    I wonder if they could design one with a thin hard compound down the center for riding on hard surfaces with "paddles" to either side.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dario8888 View Post
    I never tried to ride them on sand and i wanted to know if it's as good as on snow.


    I'd always rather be riding my Pugsley on sand because that means I'm most likely in Baja Mexico enjoying some beach camping.

    Traction on sand is great and there is lots to explore at the beach and in the desert behind the beach.



    I've had lots of fun riding my fatty on snow, but that's out of necessity because I lived in a part of Canada that had a long winter at the time. I've since moved to the coast where I can trail ride on a "normal" mountain bike 12 months of the year and I don't miss the winter riding!



    I do miss Baja - just about every day of the winter though...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    I ride on super soft ocean sand all the time. I have a Moonlander and have used BFL's as well as Bud & Lou. Both work well but BFL is best. Consensus around here is BFL on 100mm rims is best setup. The lower the tire psi the better.

    Riding on sand can go from challenging to moderately easy. A LOT of it depends on sand conditions which change daily with the tides. Also wind speed and direction are very important. I find readjusting my mindset about speed has to be readjusted way down from trails riding. For longer beach rides better to not have a time agenda, pack a snack or lunch, and just take it as it comes.

    In general my Moonie is great on the beach. I tell people that the big tires make it possible but not easy. Again really depends on conditions. Sometimes I'm doing 3-4 mph in lowest 3 gears and others I'm flying along at 8-12.

    Don't plan on climbing in the sand at all. It's amazing how the bike will be cruising along and all of a sudden break traction on even a modest incline. Same thing happens if you try and stand and put some power down...instant spin and sink at rear tire. Forget about climbing dunes.

    This is all at slower speeds where power through the pedals is needed. If you can build up some speed beforehand you can definitely charge some smaller dunes where you carry momentum up the face. I've done that and it's a blast. But don't expect to power up anything in a low gear.

    I'd love to see a "paddle" tire for deep sand/beach riding. Same as Moto uses for dune riding. However, I think that would be an even smaller sliver of an already small market. Plus you wouldn't want want to ride a paddle tire to the beach on a dry trail or pavement. Obviously wouldn't roll well plus would significantly reduce the lifespan of what I'm sure would be an expensive tire. Having said that, I would buy one. You only need 1 for the rear.

    I wonder if they could design one with a thin hard compound down the center for riding on hard surfaces with "paddles" to either side.
    Very good advice here. Sand is like snow, it doesn't have a constant condition. What's ride-able one day, might not be the next. Sand that's wind blown and packed or has a crust is great until something motorized has rototilled it. Going up anything significant sucks.

    Gratuitous sand shot.

    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  21. #21
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    Sand is almost all I do on mine. The video is my old, deceased frame.

    Disclaimer: ComCycle USA

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sand Rat View Post
    Dario; probably one of the best people to learn about sand dunes on this forum would be Ward. He also has done some experimentation with 'forming' his own tire treads for the sand, which is worth a look.
    Dune/Sand Quest Thread

  23. #23
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    Depends on the snow or sand conditions. Both can be hard or easy. In my experience so far, sand has been harder than snow most of the time. At least both are fun to ride in!

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    I ride on super soft ocean sand all the time. I have a Moonlander and have used BFL's as well as Bud & Lou. Both work well but BFL is best. Consensus around here is BFL on 100mm rims is best setup. The lower the tire psi the better.

    Riding on sand can go from challenging to moderately easy. A LOT of it depends on sand conditions which change daily with the tides. Also wind speed and direction are very important. I find readjusting my mindset about speed has to be readjusted way down from trails riding. For longer beach rides better to not have a time agenda, pack a snack or lunch, and just take it as it comes.

    In general my Moonie is great on the beach. I tell people that the big tires make it possible but not easy. Again really depends on conditions. Sometimes I'm doing 3-4 mph in lowest 3 gears and others I'm flying along at 8-12.

    Don't plan on climbing in the sand at all. It's amazing how the bike will be cruising along and all of a sudden break traction on even a modest incline. Same thing happens if you try and stand and put some power down...instant spin and sink at rear tire. Forget about climbing dunes.

    This is all at slower speeds where power through the pedals is needed. If you can build up some speed beforehand you can definitely charge some smaller dunes where you carry momentum up the face. I've done that and it's a blast. But don't expect to power up anything in a low gear.

    I'd love to see a "paddle" tire for deep sand/beach riding. Same as Moto uses for dune riding. However, I think that would be an even smaller sliver of an already small market. Plus you wouldn't want want to ride a paddle tire to the beach on a dry trail or pavement. Obviously wouldn't roll well plus would significantly reduce the lifespan of what I'm sure would be an expensive tire. Having said that, I would buy one. You only need 1 for the rear.

    I wonder if they could design one with a thin hard compound down the center for riding on hard surfaces with "paddles" to either side.
    Thank you for the advices, now i know better what i can and cannot do on sand!
    The next step is just to try it!!!!!

  25. #25
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    Name:  12-Sea-Sand-Snow.jpg
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    Fat Bikes better on sand or snow?-img_6755.jpg

    It would be great to find a place like this to try the difference between snow and sand, does anybody knows one?

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