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  1. #1
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    Fat bike long rides, what's in your emergency supply packs?

    I'm sure needs and terrain and time out on the ride matter, but I have:
    Tire levers
    Patch kit
    Chain tool and extra links
    Allen keys
    Frame pump(a woefully small one!)

    What do you all have? Trying to get ideas for a better supply kit for longer rides farther away from civilization(I must admit knowing I am very close to places to get help or a phone if needed affects how much I carry). Looking to tread farther away from that safety, what do you need/have for your fatty emergency kit? And what do you carry it all in?
    Last edited by Nakedbabytoes; 02-07-2013 at 06:53 AM.

  2. #2
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    Much of it depends on locale obviously, I always carry have on my person the following:

    Something for Fire starting (firesteel, lighter, petroleum jelly cotton balls "PJB's", matches)
    A cutting tool (a leatherman, folding knife or small fixed blade Derma-safe knife/saws work in a pinch and take up little space)
    A flashlight (Fenix e01, Maglite Solitaire, Streamlight 66118 or similar LED)

    Some additional items to consider, some of which I also carry with me as I ride in the mountains with little to no cell reception in all types of weather:

    Whistle (Fox 40 pea-less which is nice for colder temperatures)
    Emergency Blanket (SOL, AMK or similar mylar blanket)
    Aluminum foil (Piece of heavy duty folded can be used as a make shift vessel for melting snow or drinking)
    Energy Food/Bar/Hard Candy
    Small tin of Dermatone protection creme
    Toilet Tissue (small folded packs from Military MRE's are handy)
    Couple of bandaids, simple first aid items, moleskin
    Duct Tape (wrapped around a broken pencil or straw filled with PJB mentioned above)
    Chapstick or similar
    Bandana/Handkerchief (Both cotton and wool)
    Spare pair of socks
    Et cetera......

  3. #3
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    I like this question and change up what I carry depending on the weather and remoteness of my trip. In winter I find myself bringing extra clothes to help layer and to save me in the event I get wet or hurt and can't get out. One of my favorite things is the New Trent IMP 120D 12000 mAh battery pack. It is small and will charge my phone about 4-5 times. GPS programs are both fun and help me get out when lost on the trail and it is nice to know I will have battery power. I also use it to watch movies at night when bikepacking.
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  4. #4
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    All my fat bike rides are above 8,000', so when it gets dark the cold comes on fast. Not to mention changing weather comes in quickly. So I carry a few things just in case.

    -Extra tube
    -Quik Stik
    -Multi Tool (including chain tool): robonza: Review: Crank Brothers M19 Multi Tool
    -Patch Kit
    -Zip Ties
    I keep it all in a Ortlieb Saddle Bag, and the tools organized in a Soulrun Tool Roll.
    I carry a Lezyne pump on my frame.
    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-X...0/P2020031.jpg



    I also bring extra clothes;
    -down vest: robonza: Review: Patagonia Down Sweater Vest
    -wool mittens: robonza: Review: Fox River Double Ragg Mittens
    -Mitten Covers: robonza: Review: CAMP Windmit'n
    OR Acetylene Jacket: robonza: Review: Outdoor Research Acetylene Jacket
    -Two of those little hand warmers, just in case...

    I know it sort of sounds like a lot, but really it doesn't way anything or take up much room.

    Joe

  5. #5
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
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    Tire levers
    Patch kit
    Spare Tube
    Chain tool and extra links
    Allen keys
    Crank Bros pump
    That's about it. The bike is so damn heavy that I don't want to carry much more.

  6. #6
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    I keep a small frame bag on my Pugs with supplies.

    - tire levers
    - pump
    - patch kit
    - wrench for IGH bolts
    - kevlar emergency spokes x 2
    - multi-tool
    - lock [sometimes]

    The bag is half empty so I have room for a few power bars and a bottle of water.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  7. #7
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    I never leave the parking lot without snacks. I bring enough clothes to let me stand around fixing things or whining about my injury without freezing to death. I have tape around my seatpost and I bring large zip ties for improvised repairs.
    If it is really cold (-30°C) I put a spare pump in my jacket, just in case. I have a fire steel and lint with wax for kindling. If I am alone, I bring my spot tracker.
    Of course my idea of a long ride is 3 days or more, so i also bring my camping equipment and food.

  8. #8
    Nemophilist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nakedbabytoes View Post
    I'm sure needs and terrain and time out on the ride matter, but I have:
    Tire levers
    Patch kit
    Chain tool and extra links
    Allen keys
    Frame pump(a woefully small one!)
    Hey;

    That's a decent list for us non-adventure riders not straying too far from civilization. Let me revise and add;

    - Single lever. Most often they are not even needed, but one usually does it. Not heavy, but more weight and clutter. Sticks or fingers usually work just fine.
    - Patch kit - Yep. A REAL kit with glue, please. Temp dot types won't stick to tubes that have to expand a lot.
    - Chain tool and extra links - I use SRAM chains for the Power Link alone. Carry 3-4 of these and you can fix some rude problems!
    - Allen keys

    Those last two tools can be covered quite nicely by a multi tool. I use a Topeak Alien II and it is awesome. Other than not having pliers, it has never left me wanting for a tool out in the woods. Well, it doesn't have a hammer, but a rock has always worked nicely. No shortage of those around Upstate NY! I've done mangled chains, derailleurs, cables, chain rings even (THAT was a good one!)... you name it. Great piece to have. Add a Leatherman type tool for pliers and you're 90% tool covered. Plus, it is all self contained and easier to keep track of.

    - Pump - of course, but make it one you can rely on!

    If you want to keep it basic like you have now, I think you still MUST add tape and zip ties. I carry a roll of electrical tape, and 2" athletic tape. Both are very versatile and can be used for anything from taping broken derailleurs to your frame to keep them out of your way to splinting a broken arm or leg even. Taped my helmet on my head when the buckle broke once! Zip ties, the same. So many uses for these items that it boggles the mind. Best thing is they are easy to carry, don't take a lot of space, and don't weigh very much.
    Last edited by TrailMaker; 02-07-2013 at 04:21 PM.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
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  9. #9
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    I now feel grossly unprepared...

  10. #10
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    Spare tube
    2 Tire levers
    multi tool
    frame pump
    co2 inflator with 3 cartridges
    chain links
    zip ties
    small first aid kit
    warm gloves (I ride with thin gloves and pogies)
    snacks

    I'm rarely more than 10 miles away from civilization in the winter though.

  11. #11
    Chronic Underachiever
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    No tire levers for me, but tube, patch kit and pump; mini-tool, chain breaker and small leatherman.

    Chain links, derailleur hanger, jockey pulley, zip ties and gorilla tape.

    Patagonia down sweater, which stuffs down to fit in the frame bag—expensive but very warm for its size. Spare socks and warm mittens, stored in my bar mitts.

    Snacks and water.

  12. #12
    Viva la Vida!
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    Fat bike long rides, what's in your emergency supply packs?

    A spare tube
    Patch kit with glue
    Emergency Kit; (Gauzes, wipes, band aids, super glue, surgical tape, peroxide and pain killers (Loritabs and Ibuprofen))
    2 OZ Bottle of Stans
    Mini pump and CO2 inflator
    CO2 cartridges (2 or more)
    Tools bag (multitool, chain breaker, socket wrench, spoke wrench, mini crescent wrench, tire levers, sand paper, cleat screw, seat post saddle screw a couple of master links)
    Crankbrothers Multitool 19
    Duck tape
    Some dollar bills
    Zip ties
    Goretex beanie
    Hand Warmers (The ones you shake)
    Emergency pocket size LED lamp
    Energy bar & Power Gel
    A bottle of Fizz
    Sun block
    Toilet paper
    Condom
    2 packs of wipes
    Windbreaker
    Lighter
    $20
    ID tag with emergency contact #'s and blood type
    And of course 100 OZ of water
    Oh and my phone
    We do not stop playing because we grow old;
    We grow old because we stop playing

  13. #13
    Fat & Single
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    Spot 2 tracker (epirb)
    Mobile phone & $10 in Lezyne waterproof wallet
    1 spare tube
    1 small puncture repair kit
    8 spare chain links
    2 sets of speed links
    1 tyre boot
    2 stretch bandages
    1 presta/schrader adaptor
    Leyzne 210mm alloy drive pump
    2 Co2 cartridges
    Co2 inflator
    1 CB19 multitool
    Torq bar

    The spot2 tracker is the best addition in the past year, cheap insurance for loney rides over here in case of a snake bite. I can put the map screen up on the computer before i go out, activate the track function and every 10 mins it send a position to the Spot computer the the missus can see on google maps where i am exactly.... if she cares
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  14. #14
    Viva la Vida!
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    Fat bike long rides, what's in your emergency supply packs?

    Quote Originally Posted by ozzybmx View Post
    Spot 2 tracker (epirb)


    The spot2 tracker is the best addition in the past year, cheap insurance for loney rides over here in case of a snake bite. I can put the map screen up on the computer before i go out, activate the track function and every 10 mins it send a position to the Spot computer the the missus can see on google maps where i am exactly.... if she cares
    The same can be accomplished with your iPhone just install find my iPhone app and as long as you have battery and connection they can see where you are.
    We do not stop playing because we grow old;
    We grow old because we stop playing

  15. #15
    Bite Me.
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    1 liter Hornitos Tequila, 1 lb cooked bacon, inflatable wife doll, extra large bag of chips, 1 lb Nutella spread, AR15.....oh, wait, I'm sorry - that was my survival bunker list.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fat bike long rides, what's in your emergency supply packs?-infla.jpg  

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  16. #16
    Laramie, Wyoming
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    "The same can be accomplished with your iPhone just install find my iPhone app and as long as you have battery and connection they can see where you are."


    One big difference is that the battery on your phone will only last a fraction of the time the batteries in the spot last. I usually end up replacing the batteries in my spot just because I feel it's been a long time since I have. I also feel that the gps reception is better on the spot.

  17. #17
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    Remember that car trip game, "I'm going to grandma's house and I'm going to bring..."??? (everyone recites the list and then adds an item until someone can't remember the whole list and they are eliminated).

    Anyway, I have some of the above and also like to bring a warm hat as I think it makes a big difference if you have to fix, walk, or wait, compared to the skimpy hat that is comfy for riding. I have never used but also carry a mylar mini shelter/blanket. A bar light + a helmet light, partly for better visibility, but mostly for insurance in case 1 dies. Also a fan of the Park MT-1 tool for its simplicity, versatility, and not needing to deal with unfolding, etc. It doesn't do everything, but it does a lot easier.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    "One big difference is that the battery on your phone will only last a fraction of the time the batteries in the spot last. I usually end up replacing the batteries in my spot just because I feel it's been a long time since I have. I also feel that the gps reception is better on the spot.
    The other, much bigger difference is that if I had an iphone, it would have the same no reception in the back country that all cellular data devices have. Depending on cell phones as emergency devices is a good way not to get rescued.

  19. #19
    Fat & Single
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    The track feature is only a bonus and could be used if you crash in a remote area and cant activate your Spot2 because you have KO'd yourself, broken both legs, fell down a cliff or something that stops you getting to your pack and activating the SOS button. Then you can be traced to the signal through the tracker when someone is looking for you.

    My main reason for carrying one is a Brown Snake bite, they are the most common snake here and they are the Number 2 most deadliest snake on the planet (we also have #1 here too - Inland Taipan). If you move after getting bitten like trying to ride to safety, the venom travels through your lymphatic system and you'll be unconsious in 30 mins and dead in an hour.... activate the Spot2, bandage the limb and you can sit quite comfortably for several hours while help comes.

    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    I usually end up replacing the batteries in my spot just because I feel it's been a long time since I have.
    Yeah those Energizer Lithium last forever in that device.... im feeling like you at the moment, surely they are due for a change and i might change them just in case.
    Last edited by ozzybmx; 02-08-2013 at 07:10 PM.
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  20. #20
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    Super great info here! Thanks!
    It definately gives me some ideas on what I am lacking, even for my shorter rides. Some of you really could survive quite well out in the elements and get yourselves out of pretty much anything. Kudos!
    It is funny that a few of you mention the Patagonia down sweater. I have both the vest and the hoodie of the nano puff series and they are quite warm and packable. I'll have to throw one in my bag from now on, good tip!

  21. #21
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    Apparently, I'm not packing enough. I bring the same as I do on long summer mtb rides. Multi-tool, chaintool, water, honey, a pump and a spare 2.5 tube.
    What I pack if it's really cold out: DIY pogies, backup hat, a flask and manliness.

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