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  1. #1
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    Exposure to Salt While Transporting Your Bike

    For those of us who's bikes are exposed to road salt when we transport our bikes, how do you deal with the inevitable pitting & corrosion to the metal parts on the bike? Attempt to wipe the bike down? Bring the bike indoors? Don't worry about it?

    I'm not overly anal about keeping my bikes pristine, but the salt takes a toll very quickly. I rode my Pugsley for 3 seasons & didn't really try to keep it clean. It looked like hell when I sold it last spring.

    My new carbon Beargrease frame could care less about salt, but the rest of the bike is already showing some pitting. I'm close to buying a minivan simply so I can transport the bike inside. Am I overly worrisome about this? Probably. Anyone have similar (or different) thoughts?
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

  2. #2
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    Exposure to Salt While Transporting Your Bike

    I have this issue. I've taken to wd40 bike wash and rinse with a pump up garden sprayer. Leaves a small puddle on garage floor, but no salt just eating away all night.

  3. #3
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    Salt away salt spray remover.
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  4. #4
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    In Scotland most of us ride their bike on the beach and Washing after this is a must. Once washed a wipe down to dry, then a good spray with GT85 and oil the chain, job done.

    One thing that a friend of mine has when carrying his bike on the back of his van is a nylon cover over the bike, not only does it keep the worst of the spray off but keeps away prying eye's!

  5. #5
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    I moved from a state that uses salt to one that doesn't

    I'm not kidding, that really is my solution.

  6. #6
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    Washing with a garden hoes is pretty much out of the question when it's below zero. I would bring my bike to my basement if I could but that's no good when the entire basement is finished with no place to let it melt & dry. The best I've been able to do is remove my wheels & letting them melt in the crawl space. The frame can be wiped down much more easily with the wheels removed. Still, the salt is doing it's damage regardless of my efforts. It might be minivan time.
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

  7. #7
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    I don't get road spray when transporting on the roof rack. I try to avoid using the hitch mount in inclement weather.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_Scotsman View Post

    One thing that a friend of mine has when carrying his bike on the back of his van is a nylon cover over the bike, not only does it keep the worst of the spray off but keeps away prying eye's!
    And also can block ones tail lights. I get a little spray even on top of the car and yes it sucks when it is to cold out to wash it. I am in the same situation and trying to figure out a remedy as well. Damn WI and the bitter cold temps this year!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I don't get road spray when transporting on the roof rack. I try to avoid using the hitch mount in inclement weather.
    I've noticed this too, for both bikes and skis.

  10. #10
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    Or just throw it on the car with the wheels off. I have a BMW 3 series and my bike goes on the back seat, 2 wheels in the boot (trunk)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddslacker View Post
    I've noticed this too, for both bikes and skis.
    Really? I used to transport skis (in a bag) on a roof-rack and we'd get all kinds of grime and nasty stuff.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
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    Hitch rack till it snows, then a roof rack.

    My rule of thumb is, if the windshield is clean, so is my bike on the roof.

    When it is inevitable, I recommend the three gallon rule to customers. Save 3 windshield squirt jugs (or whatever your gallon of choice is), fill them with piping hot tap water, and glug all over the bike ASAP after you get home. By the time you're done with the 3rd gallon, you're generally looking for places that you haven't already hit well at least once.

    Takes a few minutes, but far better than letting it rot your stuff.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  13. #13
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    I put my bike on roof rack and don't bring it inside. Salt isn't bad until it gets wet. Dry salt on metal metal = little to no reaction....add water then things get nasty

  14. #14
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    Rinsing the bike is great, but what about the water getting into the bearings and freezing? If taking the bike indoors is not an option I worry about that water freezing after it gets into tight places. I've been wiping & drying but not pouring water over the bike. Plus, in my experience, simply pouring water over the bike will not remove salt.
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddslacker View Post
    I moved from a state that uses salt to one that doesn't

    I'm not kidding, that really is my solution.
    I would have bought a van and put my bike inside


    but i hate moving

  16. #16
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    use a self coiling hose and disconnect and hang it in a tree when you are done

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Really? I used to transport skis (in a bag) on a roof-rack and we'd get all kinds of grime and nasty stuff.
    I think the grime on the roof comes from cars in front of you so it depends how much traffic there is.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by onepivot View Post
    Rinsing the bike is great, but what about the water getting into the bearings and freezing? If taking the bike indoors is not an option I worry about that water freezing after it gets into tight places. I've been wiping & drying but not pouring water over the bike. Plus, in my experience, simply pouring water over the bike will not remove salt.
    Hosing will push water a lot deeper potentially, than pouring out of a jug.

    The hot water I suggested, puts salt into solution faster, as well as melts the icy crud it's stuck in, better.

    I wouldn't worry about some ice in spots if you can't bring it inside, better that, than salt in those same crevices.

    Lesser of two evils I suppose....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  19. #19
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    I have a garden hose setup that can be used in the winter (the pipe and tap empties itself of water, thus no freezing), however, a simple garden sprayer filled with warm (and soapy of you wish) water can be used in freezing temps:

    This is a one gallon type, they can be had with both smaller and larger reservoirs:

    Chapin 20000 1 Gallon Lawn and Garden Sprayer New | eBay
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  20. #20
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    +1 on the hot water in gallon jugs like Mendon does...

    I do bring mine indoors after and let it drip dry on some towels. Looks nice and salt free after, and always oil and wipe down chain after drying. I've been doing this all Winter, and no signs of rust thus far.

  21. #21
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    Anyone use Salt Away? ( Salt-Away Home Page ) . Looks like it might be the solution to use post ocean beach rides as well as road salt and grime.

  22. #22
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    I transport the bike on the roof, rather than on the back. I also remove the seatpost (and clamp) as well as pedals and chain (a snap with the KMC link).
    In addition, I flip the bars 90 degrees, as that cuts down on drag (and salt)
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by NogginBuster View Post
    Anyone use Salt Away? ( Salt-Away Home Page ) . Looks like it might be the solution to use post ocean beach rides as well as road salt and grime.
    Being in California, road salt is never on the list of concerns. Having an offshore fishing boat here on the coast gives me year-long practice on dealing with the ill effects of salt water, however. Salt Away is an excellent and very effective product. I buy it and use it by the gallon. In the case like the OP, I'd have a 2 or 3 gallon tank sprayer perpetually at the ready and just douse the entire bike with the solution. A tank sprayer will not generate the pressure a hose would so it would be bearing safe. In many instances at the end of a long day on the water, I have doused my completely salt encrusted boat & gear with the Salt Away and left it overnight without rinsing. The items are salt free and shiny when they are dry so rinsing is not a critical issue.

  24. #24
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    Re: Exposure to Salt While Transporting Your Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by NogginBuster View Post
    Anyone use Salt Away? ( Salt-Away Home Page ) . Looks like it might be the solution to use post ocean beach rides as well as road salt and grime.
    I have been this winter. Just ordered a full gallon after I went through my first 16 oz bottle. Seems to work well and I have not had any issues with it on the disc brakes. I'd like to hear others' experiences on the discs.
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  25. #25
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    I tend to ride year round on one bike or another. The rack on the trailer hitch of my truck was really handy to quickly put a bike on or off. I was transporting and riding daily at a trail about 5 miles away. Rinsed bike off regularly....Had to replace my suspension forks on the Yeti to the tune of 800 buckaroos last spring as the forks were emitting white powder residue. It tasted salty. My wheel bearing were also dead meat. I now have a bike cover to bungee over any bike I put on the rack in the winter.

    NOTE TO SELF : Salt is bad for your bike! Even if you wash it off.

  26. #26
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    anyone find any negatives to using salt away

  27. #27
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    Re: Exposure to Salt While Transporting Your Bike

    No chance in hell I'd let my bikes get covered in road salt splatter, especially when it's so easy to prevent.

    Nice bikes go inside the car. I see all these giant suv's with bikes on the back and don't get it. I have a small older 3-series bmw and it fits inside just fine. I'm sure it could fit in that suv!

  28. #28
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    Exposure to Salt While Transporting Your Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Minimaltread View Post
    anyone find any negatives to using salt away
    Second winter no issues yet.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minimaltread View Post
    anyone find any negatives to using salt away
    I've used salt away for years on a couple motorcycles I ride in winter. I've found washing the bike then applying salt away works best. After a ride or transport when I wash the bike the product makes it easier to clean, stuff doesn't seem to stick. Then I reapply after washing.
    Last edited by Speed King; 01-26-2015 at 08:39 AM.

  30. #30
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    I take off the front wheel and throw in the trunk/back seat.

    If I do (fat) road riding in crappy conditions, I'll usually rinse outside with a bucket of water, spray with Salt Away, and then bring inside to dry on a towel in a spare bedroom. Every second or third ride like that, I'll clean fully, usually every week or two. A little rust sometimes, but it usually wipes right off.
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  31. #31
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    I am in Minnesota, where they use so much salt on the roads it's not even funny. With my moonlander, i use a roof rack. I use a skins protective gear cover for the front of the bike. They make a waterproof version now, which I would have bought, but they didn't, so I have the straight neoprene/nylon version. I'll keep using these until they need to get replaced, but they still are like new after 10 years or so, so that isn't going to happen any time soon!!

    I have great luck with it. I leave the bike in the garage until the snow melts off, then bring it inside to my bike shop and then wipe it down with a damp rag, then polish it. It still looks like new.

  32. #32
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    Which rook racks are people using for their fats?

  33. #33
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    I use a Thule fork mount with a Fork-Up adapter for the front and a custom made rear wheel holder ( a piece of 6 inch pvc pipe cut in half with a velcro strap ).

  34. #34
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    Going even further with the salt damage.... The first 500 yards of our trail is melting away from people dragging salt onto the trail. Their tires are all salty from the ride/drive to the trail as well as the ridiculous amount of salt in the parking lot. We have been trying to get people to ride around in the snow in the skills park at the trail entrance to clean off their tires before hitting the trail.
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