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  1. #1
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    DIY Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)

    Standard 1/8" Rotozip bit ground down to create a tip similar to a keyhole router bit. The smooth skinny (1mm) part acts as a guide to create stud pocket.
    NOTE: Updated bit details at post #14 of this thread
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-bit.jpg

    Zip-tie stick-on mounting base. Grind plastic top flat on a belt sander.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-mountingbase.jpg

    Peel adhesive backing and attach flattened zip-tie base to bottom of Rotozip to create a depth stop for drilling lugs.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-rotozipplate.jpg

    Set cutting depth to match stud body.
    (4.3mm for bikestud.com studs)
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-stud_bit.jpg

    Mount tire on bike, inflate to 15psi, mark stud locations with a white Sharpie, seat yourself along with bright work light at eye level with top of tire so you can acquire your target. Wear goggles...those little chunks of rubber get hot!
    With Rotozip set to fastest speed, plunge tool into tire lug. With tool bottomed out in the lug, rotate the tool 360º in the horizontal plane to create stud pocket. Remove tool from lug by quickly lifting straight up.
    Note: DO NOT cut a pocket into any lug that is not at least 5mm tall. Trust me on this for I now own a Jumbo Jim TLE that is no longer 'TubeLess Easy'


    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-drillinglou.jpg

    Insert studs and ride.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-studdinglou.jpg
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 04-09-2018 at 04:43 AM. Reason: typo

  2. #2
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    Thanks for posting this. I’ve been unsuccessful in trying to create stud pockets for some 45 north studs. I tried custom grinding the head of a nail and ended up drilling it right through the case on a MAXXIS minion. I tried the YouTube method of just drilling a 1/8” hole but the stud will not seat. I think I’ve got a rotozip somewhere and will have to try this.

  3. #3
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    You can do this to your winter boots as well. (Link below)

    Installing studs in boots
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-08-2018 at 04:21 AM.

  4. #4
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    Very nice. I love using off the shelf stuff to mod more off the shelf stuff! Great!

    Thanks for sharing!
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

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  5. #5
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    Motivated by the glare ice forcast for the Bike Across Bago last week, I studded a Jumbo Jim (photo below) and a Hüsker Dü as guinea pigs to test my DIY stud pockets. The event consisted of three miles of mixed snow covered asphalt along with 17 miles of Zamboni grade lake ice with an ongoing dusting of fresh snow.
    (Mile 5)
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-bago2018mile5.jpg

    These were utilized as rear tires on a Blackborow and a Mukluk. The next day, I discovered one stud missing from the Jumbo Jim. It was one of the stud pockets that did not get cut deep enough during my initial experimenting with the Rotozip. I injected a little black Shoe Goo® into the pocket and after it cured, I recut the pocket at the proper depth and have been commuting all week with no more stud loss.

    The JJ and HüDü are good candidates for studding but I am now embarking on the Surly Lou which I have found to have deeper sipes and the much softer lugs which could present a challenge for stud retention.
    I fabricated a new tool from a 9/64” standard 135º drill bit in order to get a wider pocket at the bottom of the stud. I will post results with photos next week.

    The Jumbo Jim pictured below has 96 studs (two rows of 48) for use as a rear tire. The inner three rows are too shallow to stud.
    For use as a front tire, I would recommend studding the outer two rows as well for a total of 192 studs.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-jumbojim.jpg
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 05:23 AM.

  6. #6
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    I'm confused how you're getting a pocket at the bottom. When you say rotate, do you mean keeping keeping the vertical axis of the bit in the same place and spinning the tool? Or do you mean moving the axis off center and using the skinny part of the bit against the initial insertion hole and then making a small circle around the initial hole?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    Note: DO NOT cut a pocket into any lug that is not at least 5mm tall.
    It's OK not to drill the hole to the full depth of the stud body. The stud will protrude more, which can actually be helpful in some situations. This may theoretically make it easier for them to fall out, but I haven't lost any yet from a worn-down Nate I studded despite a lot of road riding.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpss View Post
    I'm confused how you're getting a pocket at the bottom
    Quote Originally Posted by Cerpss View Post
    ...moving the axis off center and using the skinny part of the bit against the initial insertion hole and then making a small circle around the initial hole
    ^^^ This

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seggybop View Post
    It's OK not to drill the hole to the full depth of the stud body. The stud will protrude more, which can actually be helpful in some situations...
    The beauty of using a Rotozip is that you can easily adjust the pocket depth. A lot of these tires have pretty soft compounds so when milling pockets, you need to be consistant with the amount of pressure that is applied to the top of the lug while drilling. I try to insert the tool until the Rotozip plate just makes contact with the top of the lug because applying pressure here can compress the lug resulting in a stud pocket deeper than desired. If you screw one up, you can always fill the hole with Shoe Goo and redrill it after it cures.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-shoegoo.jpg
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 04:46 PM.

  10. #10
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    How do you control the diameter of the hole?
    Latitude 61

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sryanak View Post
    How do you control the diameter of the hole?
    The diameter of the bit head matches the diameter of the stud and cuts a 3.5mm diameter hole when you insert it into the lug.
    When bit is fully inserted, the 1mm diameter smooth shaft of the bit acts as a guide enabling you to rotate the Rotozip a couple laps around the edge of the hole which results in a 1mm high, 6mm diameter pocket.

    The picture below is a cutaway rendering of the bit (RED) cutting a pocket in a 7mm tall tire lug.
    NOTE: See post #14 on this thread for latest bit details.

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-bit135.jpg
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 05:06 PM. Reason: update

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    The diameter of the bit head matches the diameter of the stud and cuts a 3.5mm diameter hole when you insert it into the lug.
    When bit is fully inserted, the 1mm diameter smooth shaft of the bit acts as a guide enabling you to rotate the Rotozip one revolution around the inside edge of the hole which results in a 1mm high, 6mm diameter pocket.

    The picture below is a cutaway rendering of the bit (RED) cutting a pocket in a 7mm tall tire lug.
    Attachment 1182247
    Thanks
    Latitude 61

  13. #13
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    This is the best, FB&SW, thanks so much.

  14. #14
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    How to make a bike stud bit.

    I am making a 'new and improved' v1.1 bit for milling a Surly Lou.
    It is a standard 9/64" drill bit with a 135º point (not a 118º).
    https://www.fastenal.com/products/details/0345842
    A 9/64" bit will work with the 5/32" collet on a Rotozip. We're just milling soft rubber here so a plain steel bit will suffice. A fancy tungsten/carbide bit is not necessary and will only make it more difficult to machine down.

    If you have access to a lathe, it would be a lot easier to create an accurate rendering but if you are hacking like me, here is the ghetto method.
    Clamp a power drill into a vice with bit in chuck.
    Set the power drill in REVERSE rotation at full speed.
    Chuck up a Dremel cutoff disk (I used two disks together) in your hand grinder of choice and grind bit per video below. Make sure to wear safety goggles because those little shards of metal can shoot right through your eyelids!
    https://youtu.be/n5nBUKyps0w

    AutoCAD rendering below is the objective but hey, we're working with a power drill and a hand grinder here...not a CNC lathe so get as close as you can. Oh, and buy some extra bits so you have a few to screw up.

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-bit135.jpg
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 10:28 PM.

  15. #15
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    The Jumbo Jim as pictured above is giving you enough bite in glare ice?

    I was running a partially studded wrathchild in the rear in a similar fashion as your JJ set up. When climbing a hill on glare ice I noticed it would ride a bit on the center knobs which were unstudded and would slip a bit.

    I have it fully studded now with good traction.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkerik View Post
    The Jumbo Jim as pictured above is giving you enough bite in glare ice?...
    Lacking studs near the center, the JJ can be a challenge to get rolling on glare ice because the studs do not bite the ice until you are actually on the saddle. As compensation, I milled a couple studs pockets into the toes of my Wölvhammer boots so I can push off to get rolling. Installing studs in boots
    If I stand on the pedals in lower gears, I can easily spin the tire but it is good enough to cruise across the flat ice on a lake without washing out.
    If you want to do wheelies or climb icy hills, a fully studded Wrathchild is the way to go.

    See post #20 in this thread for details on studding a Surly Lou.
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 05:49 PM.

  17. #17
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    ^^ pretty cool that you have got standard studs in some of the coolest non studded tires available!
    Studded Dillinger 4/5 For Sale

    The tires are the things on your bike that make contact w the trail

  18. #18
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    This is fantastic, thank you for sharing. I currently have Bud/Lou and am running into confidence issues while commuting due to our local freeze/thaw cycles that create lots of ice patches on pavement.

    I am in the market for some JJs for summer, and also have Big Fat Larrys (that came w/ the bike) that I could experiment with.

    I feel like studded Bud/Lou would be the best 'easy' solution that would offer traction and commutability on a single set of tires, but studded Big Fat Larrys are attractive too for my day-to-day riding over ice and snow (and if I screw them up, I still have my nice bud/lous to fall back on).

    I didn't quite understand this process until you posted the graphical cut-outs. Thank you! Any chance you're selling these bits? :P I have a drill but not any tooling for griding down drill bits.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaineb View Post
    ...I currently have Bud/Lou and am running into confidence issues while commuting due to our local freeze/thaw cycles that create lots of ice patches on pavement.

    I am in the market for some JJs for summer, and also have Big Fat Larrys (that came w/ the bike) that I could experiment with...
    If the knobs on the BFLs are at least 5mm tall, I would stud those up and save Bud/Lou for those school closing snow storms.
    My bike came with a Lou on both wheels so I immediately replaced the front with a Bud. I purchased the JJ 5 to try out as a fast fair weather tire but ended up doing 2.8 x 29 slicks instead so the JJ and the extra Lou have been gathering dust for the past two years.
    A couple weeks ago, the freeze thaw cycle was turning our annual 20 mile lake ride into a Zamboni ice event so I picked up a fully studded D5 for the front. Then, in an attempt to remain somewhat frugal, I planted $37 worth of studs into the JJ 5 for use as a rear tire to help keep the bike vertical.
    The JJ 5 was adequate but I think that a fully studded Lou would make a better mate for the D5. If this studded Lou thing works out, I am going to unstud the JJ 5 and repurpose it for use as a rear beach/street cruiser with a Vee Apache Fatty Slick up front.
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 04:35 AM.

  20. #20
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    Tackling the ice with Lou

    First the math... A Surly Lou has eight rows of studable knobs with 38 knobs per row. If you were to stud all eight rows you would end up with 304 studs. That is approaching Ice Spiker density!

    To aid in acquiring the target for milling the pockets, I marked all of the stud locations with a white Sharpie.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-lousharpie.jpg

    A couple of concerns came to the forefront during the milling process.
    1. The rubber compound in this tire is the most soft and supple that I have ever encountered. After milling 4-6 consecutive holes, the bit temperature would rise to the point that it was melting rubber so I would have to stop and clean the deposits off of the bit with a brass wire brush.

    2. The sipes is these lugs are 3mm deep which leaves a lot of the aluminum stud body exposed with only 1mm of very soft rubber to captivate the stud.
    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-lousipes.jpg

    Lou is not a 45NRTH tire with firm, fully formed stud pockets so in order to turn this sticky, aggresive snow tire into a weapons grade ice spiker, these lugs need to be reinforced.
    I grabbed a tube of black Shoe Goo, loaded up a syringe and injected copious amounts of Shoe Goo into each stud pocket prior to inserting the stud. The excess goo that oozed out got packed into the sipe around the stud body to create a firm footing for the stud. It ain't pretty but after curing for 24 hours, they do not come out willingly.
    The nice thing about the Shoe Goo is that the stud can still be cleanly removed with the stud tool although it does require more torque than removing a stud from a D5.

    Q. What do you get when you stud a Surly Lou á la 45NRTH?

    A. Louie Wrathchild

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-loustudded.jpg

    Since this is a rear tire where the outer rows (notice the casting hairs) have never come in contact with anything other than snow, I opted to do six rows for a total of 228 studs. I chose flat faced (full metal) studs for the center two rows because they are more durable and the most utilized. The other four rows are the taller, concave (hollow point) variety because I am told that they have more bite which would aid in limiting off camber washout.
    If I had to do this again, I would fill in the sipes with Shoe Goo and let it cure for a day prior to milling.

    We had an ice storm today so I got to put my McGuyver stud job to the test. I am happy to report that after 10+ miles of bar hopping, all studs are present and accounted for.

    I have read a lot of complaints in these forums about stud retention with the longer 45NRTH XL style studs. Maybe injecting a little dab of Shoe Goo into the pocket prior to stud insertion would remedy that. hum-m-m
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-28-2018 at 10:29 AM.

  21. #21
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    Cool idea, I like DIY studded tires.

    How long did it take you? I pre-drill mine through the knob, and sheet metal screw from the inside out. a box of screws is only $3. Takes a couple hours for a set of tires.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    I pre-drill mine through the knob, and sheet metal screw from the inside out. a box of screws is only $3. Takes a couple hours for a set of tires.

    I like this idea since you can't rip them out like Kold Kutters. Any problems with leaking/seeping/flatting? Ever had to put in a tube?!!?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    ...How long did it take you?...
    I did not really keep track but I can tell you that the Jumbo Jim and the HüDü took half the time per stud compared to Lou. I would say that if I did another Lou with 228 studs, it would probably take at least a couple hours per tire.
    Honestly, if I did not have an extra Lou laying around to play with, I would have purchased a Wrathchild.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    ...I pre-drill mine through the knob, and sheet metal screw from the inside out. a box of screws is only $3....
    The 'studded' HüDü came on a used bike with three rows of screws in it which I did not realize until I removed it from the rim and discovered Gorilla tape on the inside of the casing to protect the inner tube. ARGH!!

    The cost and the simplicity of screws sounds attractive but carbide studs have a few distinct advantages that made the 20¢/stud a viable option for me...

    The carbide studs provide more traction on ice and last a LOT longer than steel screws.

    A #8 screw weighs 5x as much as a 6mm carbide stud. That translates to 340g per tire for screws as opposed to 64g for carbide studs -or- 228 carbide studs weigh the same as 50 screws.

    Screws through the casing makes going tubeless more of a challenge especially if you opt not to use a liquid sealant.
    Last edited by FatBike&SlenderWoman; 02-20-2018 at 05:35 PM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    The diameter of the bit head matches the diameter of the stud and cuts a 3.5mm diameter hole when you insert it into the lug.
    When bit is fully inserted, the 1mm diameter smooth shaft of the bit acts as a guide enabling you to rotate the Rotozip a couple laps around the edge of the hole which results in a 1mm high, 6mm diameter pocket.

    The picture below is a cutaway rendering of the bit (RED) cutting a pocket in a 7mm tall tire lug.
    Attachment 1182247
    Excellent. I was killing myself trying to figure out how that worked from your first post.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I like this idea since you can't rip them out like Kold Kutters. Any problems with leaking/seeping/flatting? Ever had to put in a tube?!!?
    I've done a front/rear set of husker du that I ran 2 winters (including a handful of days with mixed exposed dirt and gravel) , and the dunder rear tire winter. Not a single drop of sealant on any of the screws.
    The kold kutters were OK for a while, but once they started to pull out, they were all ready to go. One ride I have 5! Lost. I resorted to broken toothpicks to plug the holes and keep riding/pumping.

    I have had to add a tube once, short term to get you back to the trailhead it was OK. Wouldn't want to put a lot of miles on I'm sure the screw heads would wear the tube quickly.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    I am making a 'new and improved' v1.1 bit for milling a Surly Lou.
    It is a standard 9/64" drill bit with a 135º point (not a 118º).
    https://www.fastenal.com/products/details/0345842
    A 9/64" bit will work with the 5/32" collet on a Rotozip. We're just milling soft rubber here so a plain steel bit will suffice. A fancy tungsten/carbide bit is not necessary and will only make it more difficult to machine down.

    If you have access to a lathe, it would be a lot easier to create an accurate rendering but if you are hacking like me, here is the ghetto method.
    Clamp a power drill into a vice with bit in chuck.
    Set the power drill in REVERSE rotation at full speed.
    Chuck up a Dremel cutoff disk (I used two disks together) in your hand grinder of choice and grind bit per video below. Make sure to wear safety goggles because those little shards of metal can shoot right through your eyelids!
    https://youtu.be/n5nBUKyps0w

    AutoCAD rendering below is the objective but hey, we're working with a power drill and a hand grinder here...not a CNC lathe so get as close as you can. Oh, and buy some extra bits so you have a few to screw up.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bit135.jpg 
Views:	51 
Size:	33.4 KB 
ID:	1182878
    I found some 9/64", 135 degree bits at the local TruValue hardware. I would have gotten an Irwin Turbomax bit if they would have had it in 9/64". The tips on those look very flat.Turbomax High Speed Steel Straight Shank Jobber Length Drill Bits - Tools - IRWIN TOOLS

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ... I would have gotten an Irwin Turbomax bit if they would have had it in 9/64". The tips on those look very flat.Turbomax High Speed Steel Straight Shank Jobber Length Drill Bits - Tools - IRWIN TOOLS
    Good to know.
    The 9/64" is a hair over 3.5mm. If you want a tighter fit...after you have ground down the center shaft and while the bit is still running backwards in the power drill, you can hit the outside edge of the tip very lightly with the flat side of the grinding disk to knock a few thousandths off the diameter.
    If you are using Shoe Goo as your install lube, there is nothing to be gained by tweaking the bit diameter.
    Happy milling!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    I've done a front/rear set of husker du that I ran 2 winters (including a handful of days with mixed exposed dirt and gravel) , and the dunder rear tire winter. Not a single drop of sealant on any of the screws.
    The kold kutters were OK for a while, but once they started to pull out, they were all ready to go. One ride I have 5! Lost. I resorted to broken toothpicks to plug the holes and keep riding/pumping.

    I have had to add a tube once, short term to get you back to the trailhead it was OK. Wouldn't want to put a lot of miles on I'm sure the screw heads would wear the tube quickly.
    A dab of silicone sealant on each head do a great job protecting the tube, in emergency or non tubeless.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    Good to know.
    The 9/64" is a hair over 3.5mm. If you want a tighter fit...after you have ground down the center shaft and while the bit is still running backwards in the power drill, you can hit the outside edge of the tip very lightly with the flat side of the grinding disk to knock a few thousandths off the diameter.
    If you are using Shoe Goo as your install lube, there is nothing to be gained by tweaking the bit diameter.
    Happy milling!
    Milling using your method went great. I actually used 3 dremel cut off wheels stacked to create a wider cut. I then went to a single wheel to get the cutting head as narrow as possible. (the 1mm area in your sketch). Then the problem was realized, the bit is too long to work with my Dremel + router adapter. I tried shortening it, leaving my milled portion intact, but it required removing all the smooth shank. Even with the smooth collet of the Dremel, the fluted shank did not perfectly center the tip, resulting in a slight wobble. I then found that working with a Nate is challenging. Where the Lou has one sipe cut, many of the lugs on the Nate have two. That means to center the stud in the lug you must start at the high point.



    The bit would want to walk and tear the center portion of the lug. Drilling a small pilot hole is necessary. I have a short #30 bit (slightly larger than 1/8") that should work for a new milled pocket bit. At this point it is more of a quest than necessity.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ...the bit is too long to work with my Dremel + router adapter...
    That is one of the reasons that I used a RotoZip.

    A shorter bit like this would work with a Dremel...maybe even cut it in half and have two!
    https://www.fastenal.com/products/de...%20Bits%22%7C~

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    ...I then found that working with a Nate is challenging. Where the Lou has one sipe cut, many of the lugs on the Nate have two. That means to center the stud in the lug you must start at the high point.
    I ended up filling a lot of the sipes with black Shoe Goo and then milling the pockets the next day. After the studs were installed, I went back and filled all of the sipes around the studs with Shoe Goo so no aluminum was exposed. Haven't lost a stud yet...knock on wood.
    So where is the photo of your finished project?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatBike&SlenderWoman View Post
    That is one of the reasons that I used a RotoZip.

    A shorter bit like this would work with a Dremel...maybe even cut it in half and have two!
    https://www.fastenal.com/products/de...%20Bits%22%7C~



    I ended up filling a lot of the sipes with black Shoe Goo and then milling the pockets the next day. After the studs were installed, I went back and filled all of the sipes around the studs with Shoe Goo so no aluminum was exposed. Haven't lost a stud yet...knock on wood.
    So where is the photo of your finished project?
    This is still in progress for me. I made a new bit by cutting a standard 9/64" drill bit and sharpening the tip. I then milled the shaft down to 1/8". Here is my first bit and second bit. I took a little time to polish the second bit.

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-img_2764.jpg

    I added a Lexan layer to my router base with some double sided tape. It helps to see from the top

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-img_2765.jpg

    The result still needs some work, but seems viable. I have ordered some black Shoe Goo.

    DYI Stud Pockets (so you can avoid using those expensive screw in studs)-img_2766.jpg

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    This is still in progress for me. I made a new bit by cutting a standard 9/64" drill bit and sharpening the tip. I then milled the shaft down to 1/8". Here is my first bit and second bit. I took a little time to polish the second bit.
    If you are running the bits in reverse while grinding on them, you can make the head any shape that you need and the edges will remain sharp enough to mill rubber. It took me three bits before I got the profile close to what I was looking for.
    One thing I discovered was the process of grinding would round off the outside edges of the cutting disks while at the same time making the inside edges of adjacent disks more sharp. So, when I was finished grinding, I took the disks off, reversed them so the outside edge was sharp and used that to square off where the skinny part of the bit meets the back side of the cutting tip. That is what I am doing in the video. https://youtu.be/n5nBUKyps0w


    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    I added a Lexan layer to my router base with some double sided tape. It helps to see from the top
    Sweet!


    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The result still needs some work, but seems viable. I have ordered some black Shoe Goo.
    The first dozen lugs are the learning curve but it looks like you have the depth mastered. Remember, they don't have to be pretty, they just have to stay in the pockets and a little Shoe Goo can make up for a multitude of sins.

  33. #33
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    The Nate is done. Somewhere around 228 studs. I went a little nuts with with Shoe Goo by dabbing some on the sipes before milling. In hindsight, I should have only done that to the lugs with 2 sipes. Other than looks, no harm, no foul. FB&SW, your instructions and write-up are spot on. A large syringe to put some Shoe Goo in the pockets before installing the studs is a must. It also works to fill in around some studs if there is a small gap. 4 lugs needed to be filled and re drilled. 2% is not bad.

    A little mineral spirits on a rag was necessary to clean the base of the router from time to time as the rubber turns to a hot goo.

    As for time, it probably took at most 2 hours to gather my tools, mill the two bits and make the base for the Dremel router base. Drilling the pockets and installing the studs was 2 1/2+ hours.

    The investment was:

    $40 for near new 120tpi Nate from CList
    ~$38 for 150 Bikestuds
    $6 drill bits
    $9 Shoe Goo, Black

    $93 is not bad for a tire that can go from loose snow to ice.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    I like this idea since you can't rip them out like Kold Kutters. Any problems with leaking/seeping/flatting? Ever had to put in a tube?!!?
    No air retention problems other than the (ventalated) Jumbo Jim that I eluded to in the #1 post of this thread.
    I am running the Lou on a Clown Shoe tubeless using a Fattystripper without sealant.

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