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  1. #1
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    dropper seatposts

    I have some questions about dropper seatposts.

    Do they provide a suspension like ride when unlocked?
    I see some mentioning adjustable rebound, etc,

    What ones work best for riding as a suspension seatpost if any?

    If they are not meant for that, then which one is best for what they do?

  2. #2
    Now with 20% more fat!!
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    I really enjoyed the Gravity Dropper Turbo on my 575. They are not for suspension... they just move the saddle down and back up again - some with the touch of a button. It's locked in the new position, until you send it up or down again.. There are some suspension seat posts, like the Thudbuster. What are you trying to do - what's the goal?

  3. #3
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    I was hoping it would allow me to leave it unlocked and support my weight in a mid to high position, compressing over bumps in rocky sections I would normally have to stand up on a hardtail/rigid bike, and then be able to lock in any position for riding efficiency, or clearance to maneuver really technical stuff.

    If a seatpost was designed that way, if you had enough pressure in it to support your weight, I guess it would be a little difficult to get into a low, locked position, but If the damping was mostly on the rebound, you should be able to jounce it down, and lock it.

    The problem with a suspension seatpost is that if you have it so you can pedal efficiently with your weight on it, it will rise to an even higher position when getting off the saddle, making riding really technical stuff very difficult.

  4. #4
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    Dropper seatposts only give you suspension if they are broken! They aren't a suspension seatpost at all like a Thudbuster.

    Their purpose is to allow you to drop the saddle to get it out of your way when descending or on technical trails.

    You set them up so that the saddle is a optimum height for pedaling when fully extended. Then you hit a lever and push the saddle down with your butt to drop it 3-6 inches, depending on the post. The saddle is then out of your way, and you can move around a lot more on the bike.

    The best example that I can think of is riding a vertical or near vertical steep descent. There is a 12-15 foot high one at my local park and it used to scare the crap outta me! With the saddle at optimum pedaling height, you feel like you are going to go headfirst over the handlebars because your weight is so high and far forward. Drop the saddle (either with a dropper seatpost or a qr saddle clamp) and you can get your weight back really easily. With my dropper. riding that steep is a piece of cake.

    I bought a KS Lev last spring for my full suspension bike. I don't think that I could ride without one now! Seatpost diameter was one of the reasons that I bought the Fatty. The Muk and Pugs have 27.2 seatposts which really limits choice of dropper. The Fatty is a 31.6.

    Yes, I bought a second Lev just for the Fatty!

  5. #5
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    I have a dropper spec'd on my fatty. As a short guy I struggle to hang off the back of the saddle. In my opinion they add weight, and fragility to the bike. So unless you feel the need. I would'nt bother.

    For suspension I'd recommend looking into a thudbuster from cane creek. They have a simple design, using elastomers instead of pneumatics or internal springs. Which makes them more robust. They also hinge down and back instead of just down. Which has less effect on pedal and bar distances. Clever little bike part IMHO.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
    62*28'

  6. #6
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    Waste of time, tryed a lev and it does not like cold weather keeps locking up already ben back to the factory for one rebuild, now it needs to be sent back again! Crap!!!

  7. #7
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    The gravity dropper I had a few years ago worked fine for quite a while, crankbrothers joplins die fast, I just ordered a RS reverb now after hearing some good comments!

    Go for the maximum travel as long as it fits the frame! 125 mm is better than 100mm!

    I liked my thusbuster LT on my 26" XC hardtail for some bumpy rides, but on the sandman there is no need for added suspension on XC rides, and on the rides where you would want more suspension nothing beats your own legs (if thye have space to travel).

  8. #8
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    I have the XLC Pro on its way. I wanted cheap and did'nt want a remote adding cables.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
    62*28'

  9. #9
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    Fastered - what kind of temperature did you find affected your Lev?

    I've had mine out below freezing, maybe to 20 F with no issues so far. But it doesn't get Alaska/Canadia cold here in SW Pennsylvania, so I can't say what happens at lower temperatures. I can certainly see how the oil could thicken and make the post unusable.

  10. #10
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    anyone tried the Origin8 31.6 Ultim8 adjustable suspension seatpost for $100.

    sounds too cheap to be good, but sounds like the expensive ones are pretty crappy for the price.

    What happened to Origin8's web page?
    All I can find now goes straight to J&B. I know I was able to get to it a few months ago or less.

    Did Origin8 get bought out?

  11. #11
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    I think for poor weather usuage. The cheap ones are only slightly more likely to break, than the ones costing several times as much. The robustness of an expensive model is aimed more at surviving harsh MTBing, than harsh weather.

    Thats a HUGE generalisation though.

    Part of me hopes not to find mine useful on the fatbike. So I can replace it with a simple post.
    A big boy did it, and ran away.
    62*28'

  12. #12
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    I found the same problem trying to go to Origin8's webpage a couple days ago. It's been shared by guitar ted on his website that Origin8 is a house name of J&B Importers.
    Last edited by Turtle01; 01-17-2013 at 12:25 PM.

  13. #13
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    I recommend the Gravity Dropper. It mechanically locks into position and is the only one I'm aware of that doesn't use an air spring for a return.
    Speedway Cycles owner http://fatbackbikes.com

  14. #14
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  15. #15
    will rant for food
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    Quote Originally Posted by thirstywork View Post
    I recommend the Gravity Dropper. It mechanically locks into position and is the only one I'm aware of that doesn't use an air spring for a return.
    When it comes to cold weather performance remaining the same as warm weather performance, I agree 100%.

    Just wish it had more detents.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  16. #16
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    I definitely want one with infinite adjustment. I suspect I will want to move it around near the top for cross country and street riding, trying to find a perfect height, then drop it low when descending or climbing over some nasty rocks.

    I think one that has a linkage movement kinda like the thudbuster instead of telescoping, would be good.
    It would have a near horizontal fore and aft movement at the top, allowing you to move forward when climbing and stay on the seat, and drop back and low for descending while seated or getting off the saddle.

    Plus, it might be less prone to the torsional slack I have seen in the test videos.

  17. #17
    will rant for food
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post
    I think one that has a linkage movement kinda like the thudbuster instead of telescoping, would be good.
    It would have a near horizontal fore and aft movement at the top, allowing you to move forward when climbing and stay on the seat, and drop back and low for descending while seated or getting off the saddle.

    Plus, it might be less prone to the torsional slack I have seen in the test videos.
    Agreed. Not sure why this hasn't been done yet.

    I'd now like one that has close to infinite adjustment. Something mechanically set as thirstywork pointed out, but with lots of stops.
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  18. #18
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    Ok JoeG, I had high hopes the lev would work. At 0 ish it would work with extra air pressure but when I got home and put in a warm garage it locked up and it's stuck. I talked to KS they are interested in figuring out what the problem is. They seem to think it should work in cold weather.

  19. #19
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    Fastered - It doesn't get down to 0 F very often where I'm at, and that would usually be an overnight low temp. Highs in the single digits is rare, and I'm glad! I don't have the clothes (or the desire!) to ride in that sort of temperature!

    As far as the Lev locking up, I have experienced something similar in hot weather. I bought a Lev in the spring which has been on my full suspension bike. During the summer, if I left the bike in fiberglass cap covered bed of my pickup truck and it was hot and sunny, the post would lock up. Since I normally have the post fully extended, that meant that I couldn't lower the saddle. The bike and seatpost had to be hot to the touch for this to happen. Not hot enough to burn you or anything, just noticeabley hotter than the air temp.

    All that it took to fix the issue was to put the bike in the shade for a bit and let it cool. Sometimes, it was hard to get the saddle to move the fist time, but then it worked fine after that. My guess was that it was due to the varying expansion rates of the various materials used in the seatpost. So something expanded a little more than something else and the tolerance needed for movement disappeared. Cooling it restored things to normal.

    It will be a few months till I can see if the same thing happens with the one on the Fatty!

  20. #20
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    i really want to get a dropper for my pugs but i was sure it just plain wouldnt work -30 C and didnt want to spend $200+ to find that out. Has anyone else had experience with droppers in really cold temps?
    your 29er may float over roots and rocks, but my superlight 26 just plain floats

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