Poll: Which would you choose?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 116

Thread: Down to 3

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251

    Down to 3

    Let the audiences help you decide. Please place your votes in the poll.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    520
    I'm not sold on the 27.5 fat..... yet

    The specialized is awesome, but only the carbon ones.

    For me, the Ice Cream Truck and other Surly's are 100% out because of their stupid dropouts.
    Eat Clean and Pedal More

    www.eatcleanpedalmore.com

  3. #3
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,590
    Easy, choose a company that doesn't act like they own the world.

    Surly, Growler, Jamis, Lenz (if you wanted FS), etc.

    So many choices that don't involve giving funds to the largest a**hats in the industry....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  4. #4
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    Ha, I'm not sold on carbon, so the M5 Fatboy frames are tops!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Easy, choose a company that doesn't act like they own the world.

    Surly, Growler, Jamis, Lenz (if you wanted FS), etc.

    So many choices that don't involve giving funds to the largest a**hats in the industry....
    I don't get this mindset ignoring a good bike/brand just because of ones feelings towards the business. If they make a good bike then buy that. It's not any different when people say "I will only buy American" when the alternative is so much superior.

    Also I notice you listed Surly on your list and regardless of your feelings to a business, note that the Surly option is $2k when the Farley 5 is under that and popular plus the it gets good reviews.

    But I like the Surly, I like the Trek, and I like the Fatboy hence my dilemma.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chippertheripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    959
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    I don't get this mindset ignoring a good bike/brand just because of ones feelings towards the business. If they make a good bike then buy that. It's not any different when people say "I will only buy American" when the alternative is so much superior.

    Also I notice you listed Surly on your list and regardless of your feelings to a business, note that the Surly option is $2k when the Farley 5 is under that and popular plus the it gets good reviews.

    But I like the Surly, I like the Trek, and I like the Fatboy hence my dilemma.
    I think his point was more along the lines of "choose one from a manufacturer that doesn't use a lot of proprietary 'standards'".
    Me, I just put together a Wednesday after much hemming and hawing and trying to find something that crossed over with all of my old parts (nothing exciting did).
    the thru axle/bolt/dropout wasn't a deal breaker for me though, especially considering I intend to run multiple wheel sizes on it.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by Black Squirrel View Post


    For me, the Ice Cream Truck and other Surly's are 100% out because of their stupid dropouts.
    The Gnot Boost dropouts are Gnot a problem. They give you flexibility to run SS or geared. Plus the axle does "drop out" the bottom of the frame. It's actually an ingenious alternative to sliding dropouts.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iliketexmex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    499
    I guess it depends on what type of riding you are trying to do. Have you seen this:
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...bKU/edit#gid=0

  9. #9
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,698
    I won't buy a Spec just because of how many lawsuits they have/had....

    Trek on the other hand, handled a warranty for me very quickly & painlessly, I wouldn't hesitate to buy another.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    It's actually an ingenious alternative to sliding dropouts.
    Its a poor solution to horizontal dropouts.

    It is a huge downgrade when compared to sliding/rocking dropouts.
    Eat Clean and Pedal More

    www.eatcleanpedalmore.com

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by Black Squirrel View Post
    Its a poor solution to horizontal dropouts.

    It is a huge downgrade when compared to sliding/rocking dropouts.
    Have you any experience with Gnot Boost?

    Poor solution to sliding dropouts? It IS a sliding dropout system that just allows you to remove the rear wheel vertically.

    Of course it's not equal to or better than sliding or swinging dropouts. I never stated that. Obviously Surly factored in cost when they decided to implement this design. Apparently they felt it was necessary to cut production costs. Disregarding all of that the system works just fine.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    Have you any experience with Gnot Boost?
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    It IS a sliding dropout system that just allows you to remove the rear wheel vertically.
    Exactly what is wrong with the system.

    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    Of course it's not equal to or better than sliding or swinging dropouts. I never stated that. Obviously Surly factored in cost when they decided to implement this design. Disregarding all of that the system works just fine.
    Yes, disregarding that its a poor system, its great.

    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    Apparently they felt it was necessary to cut production costs.
    Farley 5 is $200 cheaper, carbon fork and stranglehold dropouts. Granted its 10 speed Deore vs 11 speed SLX, but even swapping those parts on to the Farley wouldn't cost $200.
    Eat Clean and Pedal More

    www.eatcleanpedalmore.com

  13. #13
    hopeless moron
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    7,958
    I voted for Something Else. Here are my options for “Something Else”:

    • 9:zero:7 purple “Racer’s Special” $499.99 deal – I bought one, sold the fork, got a cheap Chinese carbon fork and Nextie Carbon toobliss rims, singlespeeded it; weighs a svelte 26 pounds for not much money
    • Cheap no-name Chinese eBay carbon frame – get a 120mm Bluto for $450.00 which will steepen the headtube angle, throw a cheap set of Nexties and a simple 1x10 drivetrain along with a 35mm stem and a 760 - 780mm bar and you have yourself a very affordable and techy-trail-capable gnar machine for less than $2,000.00

    Building up yer own bikes is fun, and allows you to customise they way in which you want, and assuming you shop around for your components you can save some money.
    one by nine works just fine but single speed is all ya need
    BTW, it’s called “sarcasm”; you’re soaking in it!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    20
    FATBACK Rhino Because it rules

  15. #15
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,391
    Farley, because fat guy in a skinny jacket.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chippertheripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    959
    For the record, it’s “little coat”, not skinny jacket.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by Chippertheripper View Post
    I think his point was more along the lines of "choose one from a manufacturer that doesn't use a lot of proprietary 'standards'".
    Me, I just put together a Wednesday after much hemming and hawing and trying to find something that crossed over with all of my old parts (nothing exciting did).
    the thru axle/bolt/dropout wasn't a deal breaker for me though, especially considering I intend to run multiple wheel sizes on it.
    No, his dislike for the way Trek does business from a bike shop's perspective is well documented.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    I voted for Something Else. Here are my options for “Something Else”:

    • 9:zero:7 purple “Racer’s Special” $499.99 deal – I bought one, sold the fork, got a cheap Chinese carbon fork and Nextie Carbon toobliss rims, singlespeeded it; weighs a svelte 26 pounds for not much money
    • Cheap no-name Chinese eBay carbon frame – get a 120mm Bluto for $450.00 which will steepen the headtube angle, throw a cheap set of Nexties and a simple 1x10 drivetrain along with a 35mm stem and a 760 - 780mm bar and you have yourself a very affordable and techy-trail-capable gnar machine for less than $2,000.00

    Building up yer own bikes is fun, and allows you to customise they way in which you want, and assuming you shop around for your components you can save some money.
    I am not into modding let alone building. Otherwise I would be shopping for frames and stuff. I want it built and ready to go.

  19. #19
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,728
    The Surly dropouts are cool. I think the new ICT also has the biggest tire capacity.
    I like turtles

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,710
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Easy, choose a company that doesn't act like they own the world. Surly, Growler, Jamis, Lenz (if you wanted FS), etc. So many choices that don't involve giving funds to the largest a**hats in the industry....
    This is definitely worth a lot of "get off my lawn" points. Better than giving funds to Surly that makes an outdated bike.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    What makes it outdated?

    I had to look up dropouts and I don’t get what the issue is with them. Is there a better design for that?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    The Surly dropouts are cool. I think the new ICT also has the biggest tire capacity.
    I do like their size tire. Makes the other two look small at least to me.

  23. #23
    Fat Is Where It's At Moderator
    Reputation: DiRt DeViL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,774
    Voted for Something else and please post what and why.

    Talk to the folks @ Growler, you can get a completely custom bike without breaking the bank. If you care about color, part spec and having an unique build that's the way to go.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    406
    I wanted to use my LBS, so I was only choosing between a RM Blizzard and a Fatboy. I went with the Blizzard (2018) because:

    First and foremost, DT Swiss 350 rear hub (I'm a clyde, and its a fatbike, it's a big deal)
    Geometry
    Frame, at least in appearance, looks beefier
    Lower standover height.
    Low gearing
    Wider bars
    It just plain looked way cooler.

    I have no opinion on the other bikes.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: davpacjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    12
    I have always thought the Surly ICT looked great, that is what got my attention drawn to FBs

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    Voted for Something else and please post what and why.

    Talk to the folks @ Growler, you can get a completely custom bike without breaking the bank. If you care about color, part spec and having an unique build that's the way to go.
    Will check that out. Thanks for the tip!

    Just did and the initial cost is no better than the 3 I listed and once you start customizing it just keeps going up in price plus I don't think the tires are beefy enough for my liking. Thanks again for the suggestion though.

    Quote Originally Posted by KThaxton View Post
    I wanted to use my LBS, so I was only choosing between a RM Blizzard and a Fatboy. I went with the Blizzard (2018) because:
    Quote Originally Posted by KThaxton View Post

    First and foremost, DT Swiss 350 rear hub (I'm a clyde, and its a fatbike, it's a big deal)
    Geometry
    Frame, at least in appearance, looks beefier
    Lower standover height.
    Low gearing
    Wider bars
    It just plain looked way cooler.

    I have no opinion on the other bikes.


    I took a look at the Blizzard but I am adamant about full rigid.

  27. #27
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,590
    The two big players you list, are "wait, me too" late comers to the fat party, preferring (as usual) to let the small guys do all the heavy lifting, design and development wise.

    As such, they offer nothing beyond volume discounting, and easy access since they have a lockdown on bike shops in just about every town with more than a crossroads defining it's existence.

    Yes, I'm a well documented Trek hater, ditto for Specialized. They offer nothing that the smaller brands don't, and they're doing all the can to tear down the industry they are part of.

    I also just prefer supporting (and encouraging it in others) smaller players.

    Kinda like going into a new city, and hitting up Pizzeria Uno, instead of some small, local, passionate purveyor of pie. Sure, you'll get gut luggage either way, but the fun is in the discovery.

    Soooo many great small brands out there, don't get sucked into thinking no one knows fat bikes better than guys who came late to the party....

    Proprietary parts, soon to be dumped, so you'll have to buy a new bike when all you needed was a part. This is also an issue when you go to replace, say, a headset bearing, only to discover that your labeled Cane Creek 40 headset, has had the one or both of the bearings resized by a mm from "standard", in order to make you have to go to the dealer for the part (looking squarely at you Trek, you butt nuggets).

    Threaded bottom brackets don't suck, don't buy into the hype, they aren't easier to work on, they aren't stiffer, they aren't stronger, and they solely benefit the manufacturer.

    Steel is real (for Surly), so glad there's still a few companies that believe in it.

    Growler is a standout in that they offer exceptional value on many fronts, the vast bulk of which, are aimed at YOU, the buyer. American assembly, custom colors, custom detailing options, custom shipping container for minimal buyer fuss, and superior customer service. All that, and a really nice package overall.

    Etc etc etc. You do you, but you asked!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  28. #28
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,728
    ...
    Last edited by NYrr496; 1 Week Ago at 04:15 PM.
    I like turtles

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Eh, I heard it all before. I just want to buy and ride. I don't care if a company wants to be a monster, do you honestly think one less customer is going to hurt them? Plus how I ride no matter what I buy I am sure it will last. I am not doing the crazy stuff and if I were I probably would get into modding so I could change everything I break.

    Also Trek and Specialized are sponsoring the best of the best and if a pro is using a certain product sponsorship or not, that is a huge selling point.

    But I just checked and while it was off to a slow start Surly has taken the lead at 14. Lets see if that increases.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    I took a look at the Blizzard but I am adamant about full rigid.
    My 2018 Blizzard 30 is full rigid. I understand the 2019 30 has a Bluto however. The 10 and the 20 are rigid.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    The two big players you list, are "wait, me too" late comers to the fat party, preferring (as usual) to let the small guys do all the heavy lifting, design and development wise. Who popularized Bfat that so many now love?

    As such, they offer nothing beyond volume discounting, and easy access Yep, gotta hate that since they have a lockdown on bike shops in just about every town with more than a crossroads defining it's existence.

    Yes, I'm a well documented Trek hater, ditto for Specialized. They offer nothing that the smaller brands don't, and they're doing all the can to tear down the industry they are part of. If you consider leading cycling advocacy, hosting large charity and events and sponsoring youth cycling series tearing down the industry...

    I also just prefer supporting (and encouraging it in others) smaller players.

    Kinda like going into a new city, and hitting up Pizzeria Uno, instead of some small, local, passionate purveyor of pie. Sure, you'll get gut luggage either way, but the fun is in the discovery.

    Soooo many great small brands out there, don't get sucked into thinking no one knows fat bikes better than guys who came late to the party....

    Proprietary parts, soon to be dumped like tapered head tubes that people hated at first?, so you'll have to buy a new bike when all you needed was a part. This is also an issue when you go to replace, say, a headset bearing, only to discover that your labeled Cane Creek 40 headset, has had the one or both of the bearings resized by a mm from "standard", in order to make you have to go to the dealer for the part (looking squarely at you Trek, you butt nuggets). On one hand they are slammed for not innovating and then they are slammed for not just putting the same old parts that everyone else uses on...got it.

    Threaded bottom brackets don't suck, don't buy into the hype, they aren't easier to work on, they aren't stiffer, they aren't stronger, and they solely benefit the manufacturer.

    Steel is real (for Surly), so glad there's still a few companies that believe in it. Frame saver is glad too

    Growler is a standout in that they offer exceptional value on many fronts, the vast bulk of which, are aimed at YOU, the buyer. American assembly, custom colors, custom detailing options, custom shipping container for minimal buyer fuss, and superior customer service. All that, and a really nice package overall.

    Etc etc etc. You do you, but you asked!
    For the record the "biggest" brand fatty I have owned was a Salsa. Currently I am on an Otso. I do own a Trek road bike (as well as a Time, oh, and try to find headset bearings for a Time...) and have found it to be excellent. A friend recently had a 12 year old Trek frame replaced under warranty with the equivalent new model, with no issues.

    Smaller shops may not want to, or cannot afford to, deal with requirements placed on them by large manufactures (the same occurs for auto dealerships). There are costs and requirements associated with being a dealer.

    As with most things, there are two ways to look at things. A glass filled to the half way point is...

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,710
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    As such, they offer nothing beyond volume discounting, and easy access since they have a lockdown on bike shops in just about every town with more than a crossroads defining it's existence.
    Well that's a good reason to buy right there. Cheaper price. Bike shop available nearby when you need it.

    Yes, I'm a well documented Trek hater, ditto for Specialized. They offer nothing that the smaller brands don't, and they're doing all the can to tear down the industry they are part of.
    Looks like they are contributing to the industry to me... https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/inside_trek/social_responsibility/

    https://www.specializedfoundation.org/

    Please tell the class how they are tearing down the bike industry.

    I don't hate Surly. They make a good product, but I don't think they are relevant anymore. As with any product you manufacture, you either lead, follow or fall behind. Surly has fallen behind on something they piloted years ago. Can't tell you the last time I even saw a Surly product on the trail in the past 3 years.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Just got some info on the Surly: medium is 35lbs. Me I am an XL; that is pretty damn heavy for a bike or am I wrong?

  34. #34
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,468
    Kona WoZo
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Just got some info on the Surly: medium is 35lbs. Me I am an XL; that is pretty damn heavy for a bike or am I wrong?
    My 2015 Mukluk in XL was 32# tubeless, with pedals. The Surly, in equal trim, is probably a couple pounds heavier.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by nitrousjunky View Post
    Kona WoZo
    The Wo caught my eye and especially because it's full rigid which is a focus of mine.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chippertheripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    959
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Just got some info on the Surly: medium is 35lbs. Me I am an XL; that is pretty damn heavy for a bike or am I wrong?
    Stock complete???

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    The Wo caught my eye and especially because it's full rigid which is a focus of mine.
    While they seem to have a great warranty, those two members that have broken seat stay welds would concern me. Check out the WoZo 420mm chainstay thread. Granted, just two, but the sample size of owners is pretty small.

  39. #39
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,728
    First thing you do with that Surly is remove the tubes and make the tires tubeless oh so easily with those My Other Brother Darryl rims. There goes a significant amount of weight right there.
    I like turtles

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    First thing you do with that Surly is remove the tubes and make the tires tubeless oh so easily with those My Other Brother Darryl rims. There goes a significant amount of weight right there.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,738
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    In case you are actually new to fat bikes, it is no coincidence.



  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    102
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Just got some info on the Surly: medium is 35lbs. Me I am an XL; that is pretty damn heavy for a bike or am I wrong?
    It's not that bad. I'm an unapologetic fan of steel surly bikes and I think for the money the ICT brings a great spec and a bomb proof frame. It's not light but at somebody else here has as a sig "this is a Surly, not some carbon wannabe pretzel wagon".

  43. #43
    hopeless moron
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    7,958
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    I am not into modding let alone building. Otherwise I would be shopping for frames and stuff. I want it built and ready to go.
    You’re probably better off, as bike building is ADDICTIVE and requires lots of delicious beer.
    one by nine works just fine but single speed is all ya need
    BTW, it’s called “sarcasm”; you’re soaking in it!

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    You’re probably better off, as bike building is ADDICTIVE and requires lots of delicious beer.
    Must be swimming in sarcasm right now.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    60
    I voted "something else". I'd get a Boreolis or build my own Chiner rigid.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    469
    Of the three you posted I would consider the Trek. The Specialized is nice but has a pretty steep and short front end. The Surly's are just way to heavy in comparison to the other two bikes.

    I chose other. I have a Corvus FLT that is the best riding fatbike I've had to date. I would seriously consider a Fatback Skookum if I wasn't so into winter bikepack racing.

    Fatback Bikes Skookum - The Fat Bike Quiver Killer

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    But I like the Surly, I like the Trek, and I like the Fatboy hence my dilemma.
    I'd get all three if I were you Bob. Then the problem is solved and the game is over.

  48. #48
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by wrcRS View Post
    Of the three you posted... The Specialized is nice but has a pretty steep and short front end.
    Steep, as in a 70.5 head angle, yes, and also one of the reasons I chose it. But I find my XL to be long in front, while conversely the rear end is light and flickable for a fat bike. So, overall it's a very stable ride. I'm just getting to the point (30 days) I may play with the bars and stem.

  49. #49
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,590
    What some pro gets paid and made to ride, is a pretty pointless metric for what bike to buy. Pros will kick all our asses on a Huffy. And when said pro changes teams next year, do you run right out and buy that bike now? Talk about chasing rainbows.

    30 plus years in the industry trenches, I've seen the vast bulk of what there is to see, break, repair, warranty, or get excited about, and I will stand firmly on bigger is not better, especially in todays day and age.

    Plainly, you drink from the bigger is better glass, whereas I drink from the smaller is better one.

    I'll be enjoying my micro brew with all it's flavor and variety, Coors Light and Budweiser can find someone else to drink their swill...
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    1,710
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    What some pro gets paid and made to ride, is a pretty pointless metric for what bike to buy. Pros will kick all our asses on a Huffy. And when said pro changes teams next year, do you run right out and buy that bike now? Talk about chasing rainbows.

    30 plus years in the industry trenches, I've seen the vast bulk of what there is to see, break, repair, warranty, or get excited about, and I will stand firmly on bigger is not better, especially in todays day and age.

    Plainly, you drink from the bigger is better glass, whereas I drink from the smaller is better one.

    I'll be enjoying my micro brew with all it's flavor and variety, Coors Light and Budweiser can find someone else to drink their swill...
    You can water your lawn with the Coors Light and then tell everyone to get off of it.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    What some pro gets paid and made to ride, is a pretty pointless metric for what bike to buy. Pros will kick all our asses on a Huffy. And when said pro changes teams next year, do you run right out and buy that bike now? Talk about chasing rainbows....
    I don't exactly agree with that. Hardware is as important as the skill and strength of the person using it. A bike from Costco, BJ's, Walmart, etc. will be harder to ride; this I know for a fact. Also, just because XYZ is riding a Trek doesn't necessarily mean their parts are stock as well.

    Either way between reviews, votes on this thread, and more I am strongly leaning towards the Trek Farley 5.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    I don't exactly agree with that. Hardware is as important as the skill and strength of the person using it. A bike from Costco, BJ's, Walmart, etc. will be harder to ride; this I know for a fact. Also, just because XYZ is riding a Trek doesn't necessarily mean their parts are stock as well.

    Either way between reviews, votes on this thread, and more I am strongly leaning towards the Trek Farley 5.
    While I voted and advocated for the ICT, I think the Trek is a good buy and a very good bike. On top of that, 27.5 fat is great for rollover, traction, and speed. I run 27 x 4.5 on my Ice Cream Truck. Good luck with your purchase and get out and ride!

  53. #53
    X-Ray Guy
    Reputation: Jawz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    346
    Kinda surprised/disappointed The Fatboy isnt fairing so well in this pole. Was eyeballing the base model Farley vs Fatboy for myself this winter

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    Well that's a good reason to buy right there. Cheaper price. Bike shop available nearby when you need it.



    Looks like they are contributing to the industry to me... https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/inside_trek/social_responsibility/

    https://www.specializedfoundation.org/

    Please tell the class how they are tearing down the bike industry.

    I don't hate Surly. They make a good product, but I don't think they are relevant anymore. As with any product you manufacture, you either lead, follow or fall behind. Surly has fallen behind on something they piloted years ago. Can't tell you the last time I even saw a Surly product on the trail in the past 3 years.
    They have fallen behind and now just struggle to keep up. Surly no longer innovates and leads like they did at the beginning with mass manufactured fat bikes. If you want an over priced, generic tubed steel frame than go with Surly. I’d rather buy a made in the USA Chumba if I wanted a steel frame fat bike.

  55. #55
    X-Ray Guy
    Reputation: Jawz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    346
    Did u make a final decision?

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    They have fallen behind and now just struggle to keep up. Surly no longer innovates and leads like they did at the beginning with mass manufactured fat bikes. If you want an over priced, generic tubed steel frame than go with Surly. I’d rather buy a made in the USA Chumba if I wanted a steel frame fat bike.
    So what innovations are being introduced by other fat bike manufacturers? Yes, Trek introduced 27.5 fat(complained about by many on this site) but other than that what else is new and radical aside from geometry tweaks?

    Also, how do you define "generic" steel tubing and what is wrong with it?

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    They have fallen behind and now just struggle to keep up. Surly no longer innovates and leads like they did at the beginning with mass manufactured fat bikes. If you want an over priced, generic tubed steel frame than go with Surly. I’d rather buy a made in the USA Chumba if I wanted a steel frame fat bike.
    Here we go again with the whole made in America nonsense. It’s not about where it’s made it’s about quality. Now Chumba might be good but it’s way overpriced in comparison to the 3 I listed.

  58. #58
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    I crunched all the same numbers back in August. In the end the Fatboy seemed to nice of a complete package to pass up. I was also intrigued by having steepest head angle on the market (comparing complete bikes in my sub 2k price range). Just pulled the rim strips, added valves and sealant (and pulled a few wayward thorns) and I’m good to go!

    Still way more than pleased with it. And with a dropper post I’m really starting to adjust from my 10-year-old singlespeed...

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    So what innovations are being introduced by other fat bike manufacturers? Yes, Trek introduced 27.5 fat(complained about by many on this site) but other than that what else is new and radical aside from geometry tweaks?

    Also, how do you define "generic" steel tubing and what is wrong with it?
    Surly was innovative years ago by pushing the sizes of tires and the width of wheels to provide riders with more float with frames that could take the biggest tires available. They no longer lead in that realm anymore. The first iteration of the ICT even had a PF bottom bracket, WTF? Their geometry is still pretty conservative and “natch” tubes shouldn’t come at a premium price. The new ICT just caught up with the other OEMs that could fit 5.05” tires. It’s new curved seat tube was a step backwards IMO, now you can’t slam your seat all the way down for descents unless you buy a dropper.

    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Here we go again with the whole made in America nonsense. It’s not about where it’s made it’s about quality. Now Chumba might be good but it’s way overpriced in comparison to the 3 I listed.
    I buy made in the USA if they offer what I want. It’s going to cost more because the labor is much higher than in Taiwan or China. I don’t think it is nonsense to support the workers in your country when you can. I just visited the Chumba site and their frames are the same price I see leftover NOS Surly ICT’s going for. The full bike didn’t seem that much more than what my local shop was asking for a rigid ‘18 model ICT. I don’t own Chumba and I’m not associated with them. All the bikes you list are nice, I think Fatboys have twitchy handling. Unless they changed something, I find mine to be sketchy in certain conditions like going fast downhill.
    Last edited by Snowfat; 6 Days Ago at 09:08 PM.

  60. #60
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    All the bikes you list are nice, I think Fatboys have twitchy handling. Unless they changed something, I find mine to be sketchy in certain conditions like going fast downhill.
    Mine is a 2018/2019 and I don't find it twitchy at all. Quite the opposite, I find the steering perfect for wheels with a lot of mass. I would not want a slower bike. Initially, with the seat at full extension I did feel unstable in super technical terrain, but that was easily resolved dropping the seat 10-15mm. I now run a dropper post and will ride it anywhere.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    Surly was innovative years ago by pushing the sizes of tires and the width of wheels to provide riders with more float with frames that could take the biggest tires available. They no longer lead in that realm anymore. The first iteration of the ICT even had a PF bottom bracket, WTF? Their geometry is still pretty conservative and “natch” tubes shouldn’t come at a premium price. The new ICT just caught up with the other OEMs that could fit 5.05” tires. It’s new curved seat tube was a step backwards IMO, now you can’t slam your seat all the way down for descents unless you buy a dropper.
    The first generation of Ice Cream Truck can take the VEE 2XL. Not sure where you got your info from but, yes, 5.05" tires do fit.

    Yeti rides: Surly Ice Monster Truck

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,021
    I think my suggestion would be to take a look at the 509 Jabit since it has my eye lately, but it's probably more than you want to spend. My 2nd choice would be the Growler suggestion. 3rd choice is the new Truck. Given that you have researched this enough to narrow it to 3, my vote is the Truck if you have to have the widest of tires.

    As for others with issues with Surly sliding dropouts, meh. They don't bother me. Maybe there are other options but they are probably a bit bulkier. The surly drops also don't have moving parts, other than the axle.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Snowfat View Post
    ...I buy made in the USA if they offer what I want. It’s going to cost more because the labor is much higher than in Taiwan or China. I don’t think it is nonsense to support the workers in your country when you can...
    I hear ya but again I am not focused on that either. I find what I like and get that no matter where it's made. For instance I LOVE Subaru's and always buy them. I don't care if they are made in XYZ for it's MY MONEY I am spending and I want something that is good quality and lasts.

    The Treks have been around for years and aside with people's gripes with the company and carbon in general, is there really any true issues with Trek's? I doubt it.

    In the end unless something/someone changes my mind when I have the money, it's going to be a Farley 5. I am not getting the 7 just because I want a full rigid; not because of the cost difference. I don't mind spending money as long as I am going to love and use what I bought.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    I think my suggestion would be to take a look at the 509 Jabit since it has my eye lately, but it's probably more than you want to spend. My 2nd choice would be the Growler suggestion. 3rd choice is the new Truck. Given that you have researched this enough to narrow it to 3, my vote is the Truck if you have to have the widest of tires.

    As for others with issues with Surly sliding dropouts, meh. They don't bother me. Maybe there are other options but they are probably a bit bulkier. The surly drops also don't have moving parts, other than the axle.
    Is .50 of an inch really going to matter (and no not talking about coitus)?

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Ooooo Surly is surely in the lead right now: 34 to 28 against the Farley.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,021
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Is .50 of an inch really going to matter (and no not talking about coitus)?
    As in both contexts, it depends on preference and comfort level.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  67. #67
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,728
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Ooooo Surly is surely in the lead right now: 34 to 28 against the Farley.
    ICT comes in plutonium green for the win.
    I like turtles

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    ICT comes in plutonium green for the win.
    For that year, but the next year it it will probably be another color. Tell you this, any of these 3 bikes come in camo that will be the bike I will buy.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    406
    Is this close enough to camo?

    Just look at that beauty!
    Down to 3-web_blizzard_30_profile.jpg

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Not close enough. I do LOVE the look of Maxxis tires.

    Quote Originally Posted by KThaxton View Post
    Is this close enough to camo?

    Just look at that beauty!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Web_Blizzard_30_Profile.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	55.1 KB 
ID:	1217108

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,021
    Please do not buy a Cogburn camo fatty....

    I do like RMB and still have my skinny tire Blizzard, but I would choose the SuziQ over the Blizzard personally.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by one piece crank View Post
    Mine is a 2018/2019 and I don't find it twitchy at all. Quite the opposite, I find the steering perfect for wheels with a lot of mass. I would not want a slower bike. Initially, with the seat at full extension I did feel unstable in super technical terrain, but that was easily resolved dropping the seat 10-15mm. I now run a dropper post and will ride it anywhere.
    Mine was a ‘15 Fatboy. Perhaps they tweaked the geometry since then?

    Quote Originally Posted by mohrgan View Post
    The first generation of Ice Cream Truck can take the VEE 2XL. Not sure where you got your info from but, yes, 5.05" tires do fit.

    Yeti rides: Surly Ice Monster Truck
    If it was handy I’d cut and paste the email I got from Surly a few years back when I asked them specifically if 5.05” would fit on a small frame ICT. They said there was not enough clearance to meet their standards for runout and safety. They said some people do it and are comfortable with it but they wouldn’t recommend it. Since I already had experience running large tires on a different bike with very minimal clearance and having them rub when cranking on the pedals and in other situations the ICT got dropped from my consideration. There were other bikes out at the time that offered plenty of clearance from the factory that could fit 5.05’s. Surly just now caught up with the new ICT.

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Face Visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    194
    I just bought a new 2017 Salsa Mukluk last week. It was between that and a Norco Ithaqua 2. Wanted something carbon for the weight as I expect to enter a few races this winter. Went with the Salsa over the Norco because for the same price the component spec was slightly better on the Salsa and threaded BB > PF BB (IMHO).

  74. #74
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    To be honest, you'd probably love all of them, that's why it such a difficult decision...

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    90
    The OP should definitely consider the Mukluk. It isn’t expensive, is light weight, and can clear the biggest tires available even in the XS size.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr_manny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    186
    headANGLE seatANGLE
    Farley 69.0 73.0
    fatboy 70.5 73.0
    wednesday 69.0 73.5
    ICT 68.0 73.0
    WOZO 68.5 74.5
    Mukluk 69.0 73.0

    I would go with the Kona Wozo.
    Last edited by mr_manny; 4 Days Ago at 10:54 AM.

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    295
    Uncaged,

    reduce it down to 2 bikes: ICT or Farley. The Specialized FATboy does not have a modern Geometry. Headtube angle on website for Fatboy is 71 degrees. I don't think it's wriiten in stone but I consider modern geo to have a headtube angle below 70 degrees.

    Also, to reconfirm this non-modern geo theory the specialized large has an effective top tube length of 24.6 inches, The ICT is at 25.

    Modern Geo: Slacker HTA, Longer ETT for shorter stem, Shorter chain stays.

    Modern Geo bikes are the way to go spending new bike money. That's not to say that traditional geo is not fun also, but it's not that way to go for a bike that is taking you into the future.

    I own a Surly Wednesday, so I like Surly; but the Farley is a great bike as well.

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    102
    In fat bikes, "modern geo" is not always the way to go. I have a Wednesday as well and while it is a riot when the snow is a little more packed and the trail is faster, it is kind of a handful when the trail is narrow and slow and you have to pick your way around at low speed. I rode a Lamere that had more XC geo and it was much better at slow speed plodding along. IMO for summer bikes, modern slack geo all the way. For fat bikes, it depends. If you are getting a really fat tire bike for deep snow and backcountry riding then steeper HTA is great but for spirited trail riding not so much.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    295
    PUGlife,

    You might be right about that. I live in Florida, so I don't ride in the snow.

    I could see how maybe Modern Geo puts more weight on the rear tire and throws that front wheel out further, and those 2 aspects could be bad for heavy snow. Also, in the winter your clothing is thicker and maybe a shorter ETT would be better as you are probably more comfortable riding straighter.

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    248
    I'd suggest you take a look at https://growlerbikes.com/

    look at the specs and price....

    look at the customization not only on colors and graphics, but they are willing to alter some things if you so choose.

    Willo and company are really dedicated to the customer.... spend 10 minutes on their website and then compare... maybe it won't be what you want... but check them out..

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    87
    I've also been looking for a fat bike this winter. I've been looking at the VooDoo Wazoo. For $640 it looks like a fairly good deal.

    https://www.voodoocycles.com/wazoo

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,021
    Quote Originally Posted by Katt View Post
    I've also been looking for a fat bike this winter. I've been looking at the VooDoo Wazoo. For $640 it looks like a fairly good deal.

    https://www.voodoocycles.com/wazoo
    That suggestion should go here:
    Fatbikes under $1000 bucks
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Just so everyone knows I went through this entire list and as a result I narrowed it to the 3 I have listed in the poll.

    FatBike Manufacturers
    509 Cycles
    Blacksheep Bikes
    Boo Bicycles
    Borealis Bikes
    Durango Bike Co.
    Eleven
    Ellis Cycles
    Fatback Bikes
    Foes Racing USA
    Framed Bikes
    Genesis Bikes
    Graham Cycles
    Heller Bikes
    Kent Eriksen
    Kona
    Lynskey Performance
    Maskinen
    Maxx – Germany
    Moonmen
    Moots
    Muru Cycles
    Nicolai
    Norco
    Oddity Cycles
    On-One
    Otso Cycles
    Quiring Cycles
    REEB Cycles
    Rise Bikes
    Rocky Mountain
    RSD Bikes
    Salsa
    Schlick Cycles
    Specialized Bicycle
    Surly
    Trek Bicycle
    Ventana Cycles
    Wiseman Frameworks

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tyriverag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,125
    You won't know for sure until you purchase each of the three bikes you are considering and truly put each through its paces. By that time the resale value of the two you love the least will be shot, but this is a (your) necessary sacrifice in the name of science and whatever.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by tyriverag View Post
    You won't know for sure until you purchase each of the three bikes you are considering and truly put each through its paces. By that time the resale value of the two you love the least will be shot, but this is a (your) necessary sacrifice in the name of science and whatever.
    So pay $6000-plus? I don't think so!

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    248
    most, most... not all but most people I know who purchased a fat bike, start riding it in the shoulder months as well,, or when their trusty steed is layed up with a mechanical issue..

    if you are riding it just in the snow, tires and gearing are everything...
    if you are going to ride it on singletrack with roots and rocks, I enjoy front suspension (and even in the snow to deal with people who post hole the trail you hope to ride)

    framed, growler, and a i bet a few others also offer (not that you have to go with them) ready to switch out 29+ or 27.5+ wheelsets...

    I know folks who have the trek and a few who have the fatboy, and two who have ice cream truck... fatboy and icecream truck tossed on a bluto and icecream truck bought different wheelsets.

    I still say spend 10 minutes on the growler site, before pulling the trigger. unless you have some great deals at your local bike store..

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    ...I still say spend 10 minutes on the growler site, before pulling the trigger. unless you have some great deals at your local bike store..
    No cost savings, only 5 dealers that came up in my search and one is easily 6-hours away. Yeah no thanks.

    Also I do want a dealer nearby for reasons of my own. I do want only rigid for reasons of my own.

    If I have to drive anymore than 30-minutes for a dealer I will just pass.

    Anything less than $1500 I personally found you get what you pay for and that isn't a positive statement.

    So sticking to my 3 for right now.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tyriverag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    So pay $6000-plus? I don't think so!
    Now is not the time for thrift.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by tyriverag View Post
    Now is not the time for thrift.
    Right....tell you what, you go ahead and pay that amount for all 3 bikes and get back to me which one is best. Then I will buy that off you for $800. Deal? Make sure it's in my size!

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by tyriverag View Post
    Now is not the time for thrift.
    I think what he (the OP of this thread) is saying is that he wont or cant spend $6000 on a bike , which I think is something most of us can understand. I know I certainly wouldn't chuck $6k at something that I wasn't 100% about / on board with , let alone a bike that I'm uncertain about. Theres a huuuuuge different between "thrift" and being blindly spending too much or too little.

    What I'm getting at is that like most things your spend disposable income on it comes down to A: How much your budget is and B: What you hope to gain from whatever it is your buying. And it will always vary person to person.
    2018 Transition Scout GX
    2015 Surly ICT


    The north remembers...

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tyriverag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    Right....tell you what, you go ahead and pay that amount for all 3 bikes and get back to me which one is best. Then I will buy that off you for $800. Deal? Make sure it's in my size!
    While I appreciate the sarcasm, now is not the time for that either.

    Note that you should read "either" as "eye-therr".
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    87
    I like the paint job on the 2019 Fatboy. It's not on Specialized's site yet but if you google it you can find pics of it.

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by uncaged View Post
    No cost savings, only 5 dealers that came up in my search and one is easily 6-hours away. Yeah no thanks.

    Also I do want a dealer nearby for reasons of my own. I do want only rigid for reasons of my own.

    If I have to drive anymore than 30-minutes for a dealer I will just pass.

    Anything less than $1500 I personally found you get what you pay for and that isn't a positive statement.

    So sticking to my 3 for right now.
    So used is out of the question? When I got my Mukluk it was not a year old, 300 purported miles on it (believable) and I got it for a little over half price used. When I decided to upgrade I sold it to a friend for a good deal and my cost of ownership was only about $100/yr.

    My Otso I got for 40% of what a new one would cost and it was in near pristine condition. Actually a new one would have cost me 25,000% more as my wife would have divorced me if I spent retail on an Otso with carbon hoops.

    I you buy used and at a good price you have very little risk if you do not like the bike as the major depreciation has already been taken.

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dbhammercycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,021
    Quality used is never a bad option, but since he wants to purchase from a LBS my thought is he wants a warranty.

    Uncaged: Since you have gone through such an exhaustive list as posted, what are the trade-offs you imagine between the 3 options? Rather than list their shared qualities, what are the things that separate them for comparison? Once you have those things listed, give them a preference score and take a last look at the overall package for each bike. Also, do you have a preference for the brick'n'mortar establishment you will be purchasing from? That should also weigh in the decision. My guess is that you won't appreciate the bike as much if you don't like the shop.

    Given the 3 choices, I'm still ICT but so what, you gotta be happy

    Also, you can sell the sus fork and get a nice carbon fork. The shop you buy from is probably willing to do that for you.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    128
    Depends what you're after and how you're going to ride. It can be 4-season do-it-all bike, dedicated snow machine, a bikepacking rig or else.

    I think, Trek Farley has the best frame geometry of three. Really versatile and agile fatbike that can be used all year round, from bikepacking to trail riding, can be ridden pretty aggressively add suspension, short stem and wide bars and you won't feel gimped on trail. The frame reach is rather short though.

    I have tried Fatboy Comp and I believe Farley is superior.

    Surly ICT is a classic snow machine, and quite mundane in my opinion. Wednesday looks more interesting.

  96. #96
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Did you see the Kestral on BD? Not a bad spec'd ride for $2k.

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    ...my thought is he wants a warranty.
    I look at this from an odds point of view. How many bikes have a warranty issue and what might that issue cost? 5% might have a warranty issue of some sort. 2% might be frames and that is the most expensive proposition, but for sake of argument lets say 10% of frames fail within the warranty period. What's the worst case if the 1 in 10 chance happens to you? If you buy a bike used for 50% retail and it fails, you buy another used one at 50% retail. Now you are even on dollars you have spent, but your have the broken bike to part out or for spares.

    Frankly the warranty argument for buying new is not a financially sound one. (Granted, for some find the piece of mind worth the extra cost)

  98. #98
    Off the back...
    Reputation: pinkrobe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,105
    OMG this thread rules! I vote for the Trek Farley 5. My only use for a fatbike is in snow on XC/AM singletrack or on the ride to work if there's a blizzard, and I love the 27x4.5 setup. I studded the Gnarwhals and there isn't much they can't claw through/over as long as I can supply the power. For such a big bike, it isn't that hard to get it into the air. Jumping off little side hits on the trail is fun, and the bike is stable on landings and at speed. I did throw a leg over a Fatboy, and it has the feel of an old-school XC bike - great on tight, techy trails where agility is paramount, but a bit sketchy for what I ride. The Rocky Blizzard was meh, and there is no way I'd run a Bluto in freezing temperatures. I haven't been on a Surly in a long while, but anytime I pick one up in a shop, I'm reminded of the weight. I can't imagine that they have become lighter over the years. $0.02, YMMV.
    @pinkrobeyyc
    #pinkrobeyyc

  99. #99
    one chain, two sprockets
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    268
    There seems to be a trend that the Fatboy is twitchy/sketchy with that 70.5 head angle, and this somehow limits it use. The more appropriate analysis would be: Are you rider enough to use it? For me, hell yeah - I specifically picked it for the steeper head angle and rigid fork. It's now my one-and-only and personally it rides like a dream. No trouble at all keeping up with my 27"/29" riding partners. The last thing I wanted is big heavy wheels combined with slack geo, and I absolutely put 27.5-fat in this camp...

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation: uncaged's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    Quality used is never a bad option, but since he wants to purchase from a LBS my thought is he wants a warranty.

    Uncaged: Since you have gone through such an exhaustive list as posted, what are the trade-offs you imagine between the 3 options? Rather than list their shared qualities, what are the things that separate them for comparison? Once you have those things listed, give them a preference score and take a last look at the overall package for each bike. Also, do you have a preference for the brick'n'mortar establishment you will be purchasing from? That should also weigh in the decision. My guess is that you won't appreciate the bike as much if you don't like the shop.

    Given the 3 choices, I'm still ICT but so what, you gotta be happy

    Also, you can sell the sus fork and get a nice carbon fork. The shop you buy from is probably willing to do that for you.
    Fair question. Look my knowledge goes as far as how to ride it and break the chain (I did that just didn't have the tools to put it back together). I don't understand nor know about oh this is 72 inch drop and this is that and it has XYZ and all that. I do know Shimano is favored by many and is on the last 3 bikes I had and works well.

    But getting to the point, what I look for in a bike is the bike itself: would I be happy with this. For instance when I shop for a car the look of that car is as important to me as its functionality.

    So for me I really love the look of ICT, I really love the look of the Farley, and I have to say the Fatboy is bad@$$ looking too.

    But I do want a light bike and that is why ICT is a hard pill to swallow. Also the one place that used to sell them now can only special order them for me. The other places are a hike (and would have to call to see if they have any in stock) which I really would like to lift the bike to see how heavy it is.

    Also I am at a point in my life that I want things simple and work. I sold my full-suspension MB because of just that, it was complicated. Maybe not to you or others but for me it had more crap than I needed; hence wanting full rigid Then there is the reputation with the bike which is why I like Treks. I had 2 so far and they been great, my Specialized had quarks I did not like, and the ICT looks more like a hipster brand.

    Hope that clears that up.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Ho down low down
    By INF216 in forum Utah
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-29-2015, 05:01 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-22-2015, 06:44 AM
  3. Rider down, rider down...
    By DIRTJUNKIE in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 05-25-2014, 05:53 AM
  4. Digit down, digit down ...
    By bear in forum Rider Down, injuries and recovery
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-17-2011, 05:05 AM
  5. Fun at the Double down hoe down
    By Hack in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-31-2011, 07:29 PM

Members who have read this thread: 255

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.