Page 1 of 29 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 2837
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite (Hitch, etc.)

    Got it.
    Assembled.
    First ride.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-first-ride-stock.jpg

    (sorry the stem is 180 out, I have back problems)


    ************************************************** *****************
    ~edit: starting an index, to help people find key info in this long,
    and often cluttered, thread
    ************************************************** *****************
    ================================================== =========
    If you see a post in this thread that you think would benefit others if it's indexed
    here, then please PM me the link to that post.
    ================================================== =========

    Firstly...
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    ... NEVER let any partners or friends try it. You may not get it back.
    Secondly...
    We shouldn't have to say this, but for safety and optimizing the longevity of the parts (or in some cases, just so it will ride), check, grease and adjust everything before you first ride it. Typical culprits are Bottom Bracket, Front Hub, Rear Hub, Head Set, Brakes.


    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    ... Took a magnet to my dolo the other day. the aluminum parts were: stem, crankarms (oddly enough), and rims.
    Everything else was steel or plastic.
    Recommended Upgrades
    • Bottom Bracket: $10 YST BSA Cup & Bearings, with seal to spindle shaft
    • Optimum bottom bracket (hub too) bearing torque = zero torque, yet with zero play:
    • Freewheel with a granny gear:
      Shimano Megarange: 13-34T or 14-34T
      But they're "Alpine" gearing; they swap out their 28T for the 34T, so there's a big gap to the granny.
    • custom stack of a 34T megarange
      Allows you to put a 28T back in, for having a 28T and for smoother gear progression across the range.
      Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
      Modifying a Freewheel:
      Many Massif and Dolomite owners want to put an easier gear on their bikes. This is easily done by swapping on a Megarange freewheel. The problem with the megarange freewheel is that is has a big, 10 tooth, jump between the 2 largest cogs.
    • Alternate to a custom stacked 34T megarange freewheel
      7 speed vs. 8 speed freewheel
      Allegedly the Sunrace and others that fit are inferior quality to the Shimano (softer metal? bearings don't last as long?), but... the 8 speed has the same physical spacing between the gears, so the stock derailer can access 7 of the 8, so it's a straight swap in (subject to chain length for larger gears)
      13-15-17-19-22-25-28-34T usable 15-34T or a 11,13,15,18,21,24,28,34T usable 13-34T and some others.

      Gear Inch Chart with Eight Speed Freewheel

      Quote Originally Posted by momikey View Post
      ... I ended up ordering the 8 speed Sunrace megarange 11-34T ... has the 28T second gear as a nice step down... I only use gears 1-7 and not the eighth so it ends at 13t instead of 8th gear being 11T, all I had to do was install the part and ride....
    • Triple Mtb chain-ring:
      Pretty much essential for trail riding, or have hills, or other than packed snow on the flat or packed sand on the flat.
      22-32-42T, typically manually selected by moving the chain to the 22T for hills/trails/snow/sand or 32T for road.
      Then if you find yourself changing a lot, then look to adding a front derailer.

    Popular Upgrades
    • better tubes: roll easier, lighter too
    • better tires:
      120 tpi tires roll easier, better grip, lighter too
      Huge improvement to the quality & enjoyment of your ride.
      On-one floaters seem to be the most popular of the less-expensive all-purpose fat tires.
      Coloured on-one floaters on a Dolo
      Start of list of tires people have put on a Dolo
    • Easy to knock 7+ lbs. off the Dolo's weight with new tires & DH tubes.
    • trigger shifter:
      Some prefer triggers, some don't.
      Shimano SIS 7 speed compatible.
      One example that works)
    • Better brakes (like the Avid BB7)
      And larger rotor size recommended for anything other than cruising use on flat terrain, or for clydes. Why larger rotors for your fat bike.
    • Better brake levers (Avid Speed Dial levers are a nice indulgence ($14 to $40 depending on source), but overkill)
    • Better seat, different bars

    Also Done

    Tall Riders
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Dolo comes in one size, blue.
    Last edited by Canoe; 05-19-2015 at 08:05 AM.

  2. #2
    Location: SouthPole of MN
    Reputation: duggus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,711
    Handle bars and stem on backwards. Brilliant.
    ...Be careful what you're looking at because it might be looking back...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Brakes work, shifter works, bearings lubed.
    Front axle was locked tight.

    Very well packages compared to the way the Beast was boxed. Many tubes protected with thin foam & card-stock overtop.

    Calipers are not up to my BB7 set, but they work and so far are smooth.

    Rolls better than the Beast. Appears to be the same tires. I'll measure tomorrow.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    Handle bars and stem on backwards. Brilliant.
    You couldn't take the time to read? Now that's ..., let's call it brilliant.

  5. #5
    Location: SouthPole of MN
    Reputation: duggus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    You couldn't take the time to read?
    That you have a bike set up wrong?
    ...Be careful what you're looking at because it might be looking back...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by duggus View Post
    That you have a bike set up wrong?
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    (sorry the stem is 180 out, I have back problems)
    I can change the stem. I can't change my back.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    23
    Thanks for posting it. Sitting here hoping they are back in stock soon. Probably would ride better with the stem out front, but who am I to presume to know what you like? What if you're a vet with an arm missing or something. Ride your ride dude, it' all yours after all.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Hate to "ruin" it, but I'll be needing cruiser bars & an adjustable stem, and a set-back seat post...
    Not a vet, just back and other medical problems.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ElliotN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7
    Hey there. Me, I use a BMX handlebar, leaned back a little. That's what makes me able to ride at all. You might want to try that, Canoe.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    67
    For the money, that is a great looking bike! I say get some ape hangers so your back doesn't hurt and ride the heck out of it. Please let us know how you like it after a couple of rides. I am thinking about buying one for when Dad comes to visit!

    Galen

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    A few more quick points from that short midnight ride.
    • Headset was wonderfully smooth and liquid (during assembly, and while riding at a few degrees below zero). (I've never seen this in a bike below $800, but my experience is limited)
    • Tires measure identical to the Beast tires, from the outside anyway. Have to pull one off to weigh it and the inner tube. At this point, no idea why the Dolo rolls so much better than the Beast. Tires smell, but no where near as bad as the Beast tires.
    • Wheel seemed stronger, more robust, confidence inspiring.
    • The 36 spokes are straight gauge. Couldn't find my dial calipers, but the plastic vernier one says the black Beast spokes are 1.6mm and the shiny steel Dolo spokes are 1.8mm.
    • By hand squeeze & plucking (no meter), spoke tension is good. Front wheel is tensioned slightly more on the LH than on the RH. Rear spokes have more variance in tension and their RH has meaningfully more tension. A quick look has the rims appearing to be both laterally & radially true, and it tracked nicely in that short ride.
    • No spokes creaked or cracked: appears that the wheel was properly stressed to seat the spokes & nipples as part of the build.
    • Some of the welds aren't ideal smooth waved pools, but while having to judge with paint on top, they appear strong enough.
    • The factory has taken care with the shiny paint. Not even fine surface marks from wiping with a hard cloth. I'm sure I'll fix that before too long.
    • When unpacking, I only found one small chip in the paint where the foam/card-stock shipping protection didn't extend quite far enough for whatever chipped the paint. Tube is not dinged.
    • The blue paint is far more attractive than the wallyworld photos show. And I had assumed I'd be stripping the paint off of the rims, but with it standing in front of me the bike looks good. So good I didn't even pull the decals off! (grumble grumble - I hate decals)
    • Brakes & gears obviously setup at the factory and worked out of the box.
    • Gears changed perfectly at the start of my short ride. By the end, it wouldn't go into 7th. I assume this is due to a new cable stretching.
    • Geometry is different from the Beast. The top of the head tube is much closer to the ground. ~1" closer. Riding, the Dolo seems downright "petite" compared to my Beast and a pugs with Larrys I've tried. A strange sensation to have for a fat bike.

    This is only a first look, and one bike, and no record of use, but this bike might be a real sleeper.
    And for $225.

    Hope to get it back outside sometime today to get some real photos.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: davesupra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    211
    Roughly what size would it compare it to? medium? large?
    DaveH
    '15 Salsa Horsethief
    '13 9:ZERO:7
    '09 Specialized Allez
    '16 Salsa Fargo

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    I don't have enough experience to judge that. I have to ride sitting straight up anyway.
    What points would you like measured?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: davesupra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    211
    If you could get these dimensions, that would be great.
    DaveH
    '15 Salsa Horsethief
    '13 9:ZERO:7
    '09 Specialized Allez
    '16 Salsa Fargo

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Measurements to the nearest 1/16".
    (indoors, on flat concrete floor, frame vertical, fork straight)
    (I'm describing where I measure to/from, in case I chose the wrong point; I'm sure someone will be kind enough to correct me)
    • Wheelbase (center of axle to center of axle) 44 1/2"
    • Top Tube (top center of Seat Tube to top center of Head Tube) 23 1/16"
    • Stand-over (ground to highest point of the top of the Top Tube, immediately rear of the weld to the Head Tube) 34 3/4"
    • ground to top of the lowest point of the Top Tube (immediately forward of the weld to the Seat Tube) 27"
    • Seat Tube (center of crank to top of seat tube) 17 3/16"
    • "center to center" ? (center of crank to center of top tube meeting seat tube) 13 13/16"
    • ground to center of axle 14 9/16"
    • ground to center of crank 12 3/8"
    • rear axle to center of crank 18 3/4"


    ************************************************** ************
    ~edit: adding various measurements from throughout the thread.
    ************************************************** ************
    NOTE: measurements in this post (both above and below this note) are for the original Dolo, as shipped in March 2014. Weight ~49 lbs..

    (There are reports of later Dolo's having chain stays that are "around 3/4" narrower".
    From sometime in the summer/fall of 2014, they shipped with knobby tires.
    New knobby tires, 4.245" wide, 14.5 radius (368.3mm) ~2900g)
    More clearance measurements The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite )

    • Rims: 100mm wide, outside width of rim is 101.75mm
    • 36 spokes (not 32), straight gauge 1.8mm
      .
    • stock tube: ~705g (yes, that's one tube)
    • stock tire: ~2830g (yes, that's one tire)
    • stock rim tape: ~101g (one)
    • rim cutouts: 1.5" round with 1" round by valves, save ~203g per rim
      .
    • stock tire diameter 29.375", 373.06mm radius
    • Quote Originally Posted by rotaidalg View Post
      ...width of the stock front tire at 14 PSI - the widest point measures at 4 9/16 inches (4.5625")
    • original stock tire tread
    • Surly Endo (3.7") & original stock Dolo tire (on a Beast - same rim as Dolo)
      .
    • tread/q-factor, crank-to-chainstay clearances
      .
    • chain ring 36T
    • freewheel (not a cassette), 7 speed, 14-16-18-20-22-24-28T.
      37.8 through 75.5 Gear Inches
      3.01 to 6.03 Meters of Development,
      stock 170mm cranks giving 2.82 to 5.64 gain ratio
    • derailer photo I
    • derailer photo II
    • stock shifter
      .
    • spindle is 189mm
    • bottom bracket shell is 100mm [s]<del>"about 175mm"</del> [/s]
    • crank arm: 170mm, 219g
    • stock pedal: 197g
    • pedal, crank arm, spider & chain ring (36T) with plastic chainring guard each side, for 648g. Non-drive side: crank arm & pedal, 219g + 197g for 416g. Total: 1064g, or 2.35 lbs.
    • stock chainring (at bottom)
      .
    • hubs/spread: front 135mm, rear 190mm
    • stock front hub, 522g
    • discs are 160mm
    • don't know if the front brake tabs on the 135 front are '135 front tabs' or '135 rear tabs'
    • brake photos
    • stock lever
      .
    • seat post 266g, is 10.5" below the seat clamp
    • seat post, painted, is labelled 028. The diameter ranges between 28.35mm and 28.50mm, typically 28.45mm; call it 28.6
    • seat 423g
      .
    • headset is 1 1/8" threadless
    • steerer tube 1 1/8"
    • bars 497g, clamp 25.0mm
    Last edited by Canoe; 05-09-2015 at 09:30 AM.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Photo showing measurement points.
    NOTE: photo was taken with a wide angle lens, fork turned, etc.. It is impossible for a photo to be "on axis" for every part of the bike, so do not try to do a relative measurement of the photo nor take angles off the photo and expect them to work.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-gemoetry.jpg

  17. #17
    7up
    7up is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    23
    Very nice and good luck with your new ride.Still waiting for mine.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Grabbed a couple of shots when I took the Dolo outside today for a side shot for the measurements. In the sun, it's too contrasty to bother trying to get good detail shots. But here's a few to show what it can.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-drive-side.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-rear-wheel-ls.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-rear-wheel-rs-top.jpg

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    23
    Are the brake housings full length?

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    786
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    NOTE: photo was taken with a wide angle lens, fork turned, etc.. It is impossible for a photo to be "on axis" for every part of the bike, so do not try to do a relative measurement of the photo nor take angles off the photo and expect them to work.
    I thought about that too. Just for the sake of stating it, it may be possible to get reasonably correct angles off a photo if you use a telephoto lens and stand way back. I have an 800 mm equivalent lens on my Nikon V1 so if I backed up a few hundred feet it might be pretty orthographic, if that's the right word.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by Gravelo View Post
    Are the brake housings full length?
    • Front brake cable -- fully housed to the caliper.
    • Rear brake cable -- housed, except where it runs on the underside of the top tube, running open between stops at each end, exposed to crap up off of the front wheel, with only the down tube to shield it.
    • Shift Cable -- housed from shifter to a stop under the top tube, open running beside the rear brake cable to its stop, then after a short housing over to a stop on the drive-side seat stay, runs open straight down the seat stay to a stop, then housed to take it to the derailer.

    (~edit.: at least on this Dolo)


    Mark_BC
    yes, standing off and optical zooming in would give a more accurate on-axis image, but only more accurate, not accurate. But even with the snow to reflect light into the shadows, with the direct sunlight the contrast was too high to make that worth doing today. Look how hard it is to pick out detail in those photographs.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6

    This might help...

    These photos might help to undefined illustrate some differences in the frame layout between the Beast and Dolomite.

    As orthographically as possible (yeah, that's the right term, hehe), I've put a Beast (in red) behind a Dolomite. The angle is not perfect, obviously, but you can see some clear differences that backup what Canoe has basically already said...

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140306_153447.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140306_184804.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-20140306_184921.jpg

    What may not be obvious is that the wheelbase on the Dolomite is almost an inch longer.

    In the photo of the two BBs, the rear axles are lined up, so you can see how far aft the BB on the Dolomite has moved. The chain/seat stays are shorter, and the top/bottom tubes are longer.

    The head tube on the Dolomite is much lower, and almost an inch forward of the Beast's head tube. So, the forks are shorter as well.

    In the rear shot of the bikes, you can see that the Dolomite's rear dropouts are significantly farther apart than the Beast's.

    I also think that the Dolomite's rear rim is not centered between the hub's flanges (is that called asymmetrical lacing?) to make room for a 7-sp freewheel.

    On the new frame, the BB is farther aft, and the head tube is slightly forward, so my feet don't rub on the front tire like they sometimes do on the Beast, while pedaling through a turn.

    I did a test ride with my brother, switching back and forth. We rode mainly on tarmac, and a bit on grass. We were hard-pressed to pick a favorite, handling-wise. The obvious differences are the bars, the brakes, and the gears. The Dolomite has its "upgrades" over its predecessor, and the Beast has raw simplicity on its side.

    I honestly don't know yet which one I like better..
    Last edited by Voltaggio; 03-09-2014 at 09:29 AM.

  23. #23
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: anortherncrazy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    658
    heck yeah man. make sure and give some ride reports and pix!!
    two wheel livin'..

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    44

    Re: The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    I had the Beast - changed the rear cog, quill stem, pedals, and handlebar. It was heavy so I never rode it on the trail - didn't want to walk up the hills.

    I sold it and bought a Framed Minnesota 2.0. I was surprised how much less it weighed compared to the beast. The weight of the Minnesota feels like my Trek HiFi full suspension 29er.

    I was going to buy a second set of wheels for the Minnesota but it looks like I can buy a Dolomite for the same price as the wheels. Any idea how much the Dolomite weighs? How does it compare to the beast it terms of weight?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    The shipping waybill says 49 lbs..
    Bathroom scales say the bike is 50 lbs.., but it does have a tiny front light and some dirt on it now...

    When I get the time, I'm going to pull the tires and weigh them and the tube. Going to try split-tube tubeless to see how that rolls with losing the inner tube.

    I took near 4.5 lbs. off my Beast with a DH tube and a Larry on the front, along with a token contribution from a drilled rim. Do front & back, for near 9 lbs. off. (assuming it's the same tire & tube weight as the Beast).

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6
    The Dolomite is slightly heavier due the the new components. Other than the bars and stem, I don't think there are any weight-saving changes since the Beast. If the Beast bothered you, chances are the Dolomite will too. Honestly, I'm used to really good equipment too. I raced and rode BMX back in the day, I've ridden my Ducatis on many race tracks, and I have built lots of high performance machinery in the last 30+ years...I get it.

    To me, the Beastomites are not like about that. The bikes wear a Mongoose badge, but they are not the bikes I raced as a youth. These bikes are about access to a segment of a sport that has a high price to access. These bikes are so cheap that they will bring new riders in the sport...that's mostly great...new riders can change public awareness and grease the wheels of progress. If more riders want to access public spaces, laws can change to allow that -- more bike lanes, more trails, etc. More people to buy components means that manufacturers may make more components. More riders may mean more cool people to share the sport with. More riders may mean that more of us get off the couch and get into the wind.

    At any rate...do you get what you get what you pay for with the Beastomites? Yes and no. Sure, the bikes are ridiculously cheap and you have to expect/accept many shortcuts. But are they really that bad? If I'm used to the high-grade machinery, these may seem inferior by comparison, but in my opinion, they are far more competent than their price would suggest. For the cost of a set of good Surly's skins, you get a WHOLE bike.

    Yeah, I know, you can get a cheap fatty elsewhere too...what $700-800? That's a deterrent for people who don't already know what you know. Say they buy a $200 Beastomite, ride it, then start to figure out its shortcomings, and if they want to mod it. They may mod it to the point where they've spent the same money or more anyways...so what? They have got a bike they built and they may LOVE. Is an $800 bike finished? No...it will probably have some weak stuff, and some marginal stuff too.

    My point is, we're all bikers, and biking is a sport that thrives when shared. It's healthy to share ideas. If you're lucky, smart, rich, and/or you eat Top Ramen and make other sacrifices to buy the good stuff because you are a good rider, wanna be a good rider, or you just want every advantage, that's awesome! Not everyone does that. The Beastomite rider...that person may just become a new great friend...that person may be the tipping point to open some new snow trails, ya nevah know.

    Who do people count on in a zombie apocalypse? Darryl Dixon! The Beastomites are the Darryl Dixons of the FatBike world!

    /rant

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    Well said and well done, Volt. I like your style. I hope all your Beastomite dreams and visions of the future come true. Except the zombie apocalypse.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    180
    I'm one of those people that bought a beast after not owning a bike since I was a kid...now I'm buying either a Sun Spider or a Origin8 Crawler

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dudeist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    285
    I modded my Beast to It's practical limits and loved it. Just got a new Pugs on a bro deal and getting used to it. Working my way up to carbon and/or suspension Fattie someday. The beast was good training and progression keeps me enthused.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by dudeist View Post
    Well said and well done, Volt. I like your style. I hope all your Beastomite dreams and visions of the future come true. Except the zombie apocalypse.
    Thanks you for the kind words, perhaps I gotten wiser with the years...I still obsess over details and efficiency, but I've come to realize that there are other factors at play and not everyone is as crazy as me.

    I'm like shank3r in that I've come back to bicycles after a long time away. I've worked on some great bikes lately, and I caught the bug again. But carving a grand (or three) out of a budget built for a family of 4 probably to buy/build a baddazz fattie would keep me bike-less for some time. The Beast seemed like a cheap way back...and it's much better than the pricetag would suggest -- which ain't saying much, but I work with what I've got, and create miracles where I can!

    I picked up a Dolomite as well, because, well, it was...you know...more...and still cheap...yeah, I know. My plan was to electrify one, or both, and sell one, or maybe use one for a sidehack mod of the other...or I'll sell one and make a sidehack out of a Massif, I dunno...in uncharted waters here...it'll be cool though!

    BTW, I treat the zombie apocalypse kinda like the CDC (CDC EPR | Social Media | Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse). I really don't think there will be one...earthquakes and hurricanes are a lot more likely, but hey, if you're ready for a zombie apocalypse, you're ready for anything!

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by ElliotN View Post
    Hey there. Me, I use a BMX handlebar, leaned back a little. That's what makes me able to ride at all. You might want to try that, Canoe.
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-beast-stock-cruiser-bars-adjustable-stem.jpg

    That's my stock Beast with cruiser bars & and adjustable stem. Once I go for the drop-back seat-post:
    a BMX bar may work with the right stem. With the bar in the photo, doing a 180 with the stem may be enough for the Beast and the Dolo, or I may end up using the fully curved cruiser bars I have laying around. A BMX bar would certainly provide a nicer hand position, and much easier to do the power pull/crank when a drop-back seat post provides somewhat of a crank-forward geometry. Perhaps the curved cruiser for the Beast and a BMX for the Dolo... I'll have to check out their sizes, and clamp.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    I was hitting my heels on the chain stays a few times.
    I got curious.

    Tread/Q-factor

    Beast
    (mine)
    Dolo - orig
    release March 2014
    (mine)
    Dolo - newer
    late summer/fall 2014 to ___
    (CrackerJim)
    Tread / Q-factor 9 1/2" 9 23/32" 253mm (9.96")
    outside-outside spread of chain stays at inner rim 7" 8 3/16" 191mm (7.52")
    rear axle center to crank shaft center 19 29/32" 18 3/4" 475mm (18.7")
    rear axle center to pedal center ~13 1/8" ~12" 310mm (12.2")
    clearance, chain stay to crank arm LH 24.45mm
    RH 20.0mm
    LH 9mm
    RH 8mm
    LH ?
    RH 17mm
    wheelbase 43 15/16" 44 1/2" 45 1/4"

    Additional numbers for the 2nd gen Dolo at The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite
    Last edited by Canoe; 05-06-2015 at 07:43 PM.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: davesupra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Photo showing measurement points.
    NOTE: photo was taken with a wide angle lens, fork turned, etc.. It is impossible for a photo to be "on axis" for every part of the bike, so do not try to do a relative measurement of the photo nor take angles off the photo and expect them to work.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dolo gemoetry.jpg 
Views:	34573 
Size:	112.5 KB 
ID:	875390
    Wow, thanks for the great info! :-)
    DaveH
    '15 Salsa Horsethief
    '13 9:ZERO:7
    '09 Specialized Allez
    '16 Salsa Fargo

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    Canoe,

    Can you comment on the bike components? Drivetrain (number of teeth, crank length, quality of pedals), stem length, hub widths. What brand are the brakes? Do you think that we can get replacement pads? How long is the seat post? 27.2mm diameter? Schrader valves? How about the shifter? Does it work?

    Thanks!

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    193
    Hows the bottom bracket and crank? I know that the Beast had some issues with the crank. I wonder if that was fixed?

  36. #36
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,994
    Quote Originally Posted by dieseli View Post
    Canoe,

    Can you comment on the bike components? Drivetrain (number of teeth, crank length, quality of pedals), stem length, hub widths. What brand are the brakes? Do you think that we can get replacement pads? How long is the seat post? 27.2mm diameter? Schrader valves? How about the shifter? Does it work?

    Thanks!
    it's a $225 bicycle from Wally-World. The components are going to be garbage.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    it's a $225 bicycle from Wally-World. The components are going to be garbage.
    Understand. I want to know what I am starting with so that is does not become a $500 "$225 bicycle from Wally world". If so, I would just rather buy a $500 bike.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    577
    if you have a spare parts bin to work out of it's not a bad deal. 100mm bb, 190 rear hubs spacing. it doesn't need the 100mm rims though. a vee rubber snow shoe is going to be the largest tire that will fit. and from what i have read that tire works better on a narrower rim.

  39. #39
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,994
    Putting good parts on a Walgoose is like hot-rodding an AMC Pacer. No matter what you put on it, it's still a Walgoose, it's still heavier than a bicycle has a right to be and it still has its inherent flaws, just with some shinier bits.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    Putting good parts on a Walgoose is like hot-rodding an AMC Pacer. No matter what you put on it, it's still a Walgoose, it's still heavier than a bicycle has a right to be and it still has its inherent flaws, just with some shinier bits.
    Here is a link of a friend's Pacer X he built for his daughter.

    1976 Amc Pacer X Harrel Lamkin Photo 7

    It won Hot Rod Editor's Choice on the Power Tour. I really can't remember the year.

    Galen

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,090
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    Putting good parts on a Walgoose is like hot-rodding an AMC Pacer. No matter what you put on it, it's still a Walgoose, it's still heavier than a bicycle has a right to be and it still has its inherent flaws, just with some shinier bits.
    Now you are just getting carried away. You shouldn't really care what bike they are riding or how much they spent on it. Do what you want, and spend $$ on what makes you happy. Yes, it is a Wal Mart bike, and the stern opinions and feelings towards them is what drives the hate for the bike.

    If your lbs had the exclusive rights to sell it, you would not hate it nearly as much. Not saying you wouldn't dispise it, but you wouldn't shit your pants with anger when you heard it's name mentioned.

  42. #42
    bigger than you.
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,994
    If my lbs started selling this kind of garbage, I'd find another lbs. At best, these bikes are poorly made to the point of being dangerous. I appreciate that they might serve as an entry point into fat biking, but they're so shabbily rendered, that in many, if not most cases, these bikes will be ridden a few times, then dismissed and abandoned as a pointless fad. As such they are more a disservice to our sport than a boon.
    Last edited by Gigantic; 03-11-2014 at 05:02 AM.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    Is it a cassette or freewheel on the rear wheel?

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    I'm def thinking about buying this, drilling out the wheels, upgrading crank/derailleur, and new stem and bars. I hope that its running a cassette but I know i'm just dreaming. I'd like to get it under 45lbs....think that's possible?

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6
    You can probably save 8-9 lbs. by just changing tires and tubes. With the other mods you've mentioned, the weight will likely be under 40. I believe it's a freewheel on the hub.

  46. #46
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,762
    Anyone pulled and weighed the cranks and BB yet? I bet there is a lot of weight to be saved there.

    And before anyone lambasts me for upgrading a $200 bike, I have bins of parts that have long since been paid for.
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    I'd probably be buying new parts but i figure it'll still be less than 500 total. I'm really surprised wal mart came out with a bike like this. The best part about it is you can actually upgrade things. I'm thinking bb7's some orgin8 fat bike tires, drilling the holes myself and maybe going tubeless. Should be interesting to say the least. I just can't justify spending thousands on a surly or salsa for a "fun" bike. Maybe if I had an unlimited income id splurge and get something like that.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Front brake started dragging. It was a quick adjustment to the caliper.
    Front & rear discs are labeled 160 mm.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-rear-brake.jpg

    (orange cast is reflection from my coat)
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-front-brake.jpg

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Colour is nice.
    Paint run just to right of center in the photo (top of down tube, very close to head tube, tucked in under the top tube). Otherwise, the paint is done nicely.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-colour-run.jpg

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    Doesn't look half bad...what kind of calipers are those? Any idea of what the stand over is?

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-brake-logo.jpg

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-rear-derailer.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-right-grip-controls.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-crank-arms-pedals.jpg

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    6
    Why on earth do we have to justify anything we do to something we own? It's your bike...to quote ShockG, "Doowhatchalike."

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    canoe, thanks for posting all these pics!

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    welcome

    I figure it's important that anyone considering getting one of these knows what they're getting.

    p.s.
    I drive an AMC Eagle. The 258's been baked, re-centered, mild over-bore, balanced, wide-band high-torque cam, upgraded HO head, HD valve springs, upgraded carb, HV coil & ignition module, 8.8 silicone wires, large core rad. And a swamp-cooler for those long trips.

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat85 View Post
    ... Any idea of what the stand over is?
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    I can change the stem. I can't change my back.
    I had back surgery back in '99 herniated disc so I doubt that your back is any worse than mine. I found that leaning forward over the bike makes my back feel better, not worse.
    This set up that you have .. so much more straight upwards actually puts more stress (pounding) on the lower back going over a bump. I advise that you set the stem and bars properly and give it a try for about a month or more.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    If my lbs started selling this kind of garbage, I'd find another lbs. At best, these bikes are poorly made to the point of being dangerous. I appreciate that they might serve as an entry point into fat biking, but they're so shabbily rendered, that in many, if not most cases, these bikes will be ridden a few times, then dismissed and abandoned as a pointless fad. As such they are more a disservice to our sport than a boon.
    Yup ..

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    291
    Some room to save weight for sure. But still just a hi ten steel frame and fork. Hit a few good jumps and that fork is done for. Also would be concerned with buckling at the top and down tubes and also at the brake side seat stay. Any gussets on there?

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    kris7047th, Thanks for your suggestion, but my issue isn't a herniated disc, and the back is only one issue. Between the fat tires & sitting upright I can ride. Without them, two minutes is around the limit, and I pay afterwards.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    The shipping waybill says 49 lbs..
    Bathroom scales say the bike is 50 lbs.., but it does have a tiny front light and some dirt on it now...

    When I get the time, I'm going to pull the tires and weigh them and the tube. Going to try split-tube tubeless to see how that rolls with losing the inner tube.

    I took near 4.5 lbs. off my Beast with a DH tube and a Larry on the front, along with a token contribution from a drilled rim. Do front & back, for near 9 lbs. off. (assuming it's the same tire & tube weight as the Beast).
    HOLY CRAP that is HEAVY !! My Pugs weighed only 35 lbs stock. The Pugsley frame is steel also.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-photo.jpg The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-photo.jpg

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    kris7047th, Thanks for your suggestion, but my issue isn't a herniated disc, and the back is only one issue. Between the fat tires & sitting upright I can ride. Without them, two minutes is around the limit, and I pay afterwards.
    Bummer about your back. Like I said in a thread I started I am healing from a broken pelvis which has aggravated my lower back as well. I dunno .. a bike that heavy. Have you lowered the PSI in your tires? That will help smooth out the bumps considerably and ease any stress on your back.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by Tracer650 View Post
    Any gussets on there?
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-frame-crop.jpg

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-dolo-seat-tube-bb.jpg

  64. #64
    Hooligan
    Reputation: dirtdawg21892's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    937
    thank you so much for the pictures and info, it has swayed me. i will totally pick one of these up if i get the chance.
    Quote Originally Posted by Optimus View Post
    Hell of a jump, dawg. Even though they're baggy shorts, I'm surprised that you can fit your balls into them.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ElliotN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7
    I can sympathize with Canoe about his cranky back. Me, I cannot ride leaning forward, because then I have to bend my neck up to see where I'm going, which pinches a nerve in my cranky neck, and my right arm "falls off". So I use a BMX bar and a cruiser saddle on a full suspension bike, and I can get around all right. My 2 cents. :-)

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    HOLY CRAP that is HEAVY !! My Pugs weighed only 35 lbs stock.
    Yup.
    Loose around ~9 lbs going to 120 tpi Surly & DH tube on front & rear. Another ~400g saved if you 1.5" hole the rims... plus containing rim tape. Cranks will be heavy, but won't get you into Pugs range.

    From Beast rim. Note that centered between nipples/holes, that the other side's string of holes is not exactly alined. Not material to its requirements, but not optimum either.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-1.5-inch-hole-template-beast-stock-100mm-rims.jpg

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by ElliotN View Post
    ... So I use a BMX bar and a cruiser saddle on a full suspension bike, and I can get around all right. My 2 cents. :-)
    I checked the spacing today. I suspect a BMX bar will be ideal for me, with or without the drop-back seat post. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    ... I dunno .. a bike that heavy. Have you lowered the PSI in your tires? That will help smooth out the bumps considerably and ease any stress on your back.
    It's both bumps (degree and their character) and the stress. The fat tires, tested from 3 psi to 25 psi on Larrys and Endos, do their part fine for taking care of the bumps. Without fat, I can't ride without significant pain. A Beast with a 120 tpi Surly front is fine.
    Remaining is a position issue, nothing to do with bumps. I need to be upright.
    Heavy? Yes. But I get to ride. Priceless.
    And I'm certainly not racing. Nor going any of the places I used to take a bike long before there were these strange things called Mountain Bikes.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdawg21892 View Post
    thank you so much for the pictures and info, it has swayed me. i will totally pick one of these up if i get the chance.
    But not for what's in your avatar, right?

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Hard bumps can jar the back and neck. I also have compression in my neck but that issue is minor compared to my back and knees. I have had two knee surgeries on the left knee .. '77 had reconstruction and miraculously it has held up all of these years.

    Have you test ridden a Surly Pugsley or another fat bike like the Kona at a LBS? You may be surprised the ride that you will experience, and if you do the same weight shaving mods you will get the bike ridiculously lower = a better ride and easier to manage. Even when you do shave off 10 lbs on the goose or whatever .. by the time you add fenders (who wants to get a wet mud strip up their back going through puddles?) a seat bag with tools and gear it will get right back up there.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    Have you test ridden a Surly Pugsley or another fat bike like the Kona at a LBS? ...
    Yes.
    That's how I determined that near fat was an improvement, and fat worked, but standard geometry didn't work for me.

    Yes, it's heavy.
    Heavy just means I get there later instead of sooner.

    But I get to ride.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Yes.
    That's how I determined that near fat was an improvement, and fat worked, but standard geometry didn't work for me.

    Yes, it's heavy.
    Heavy just means I get there later instead of sooner.

    But I get to ride.
    I hear you on that! I also was diagnosed with severe Osteoporosis several years ago .. effecting my left hip mostly. Through a nasal med back then and now through diet I have been able to keep it checked at moderate. When I fractured my pelvis 8 weeks ago, the doctor believed I had RE fractured it (1st time 1989) So this time was a little scary for me at my age of 63 and 125 lbs 5'5" lady .. would it heal properly and would I be able to ride again which I need to do for my health to keep my bones strong .. enjoy getting outside? This ran through my mind as I dealt getting around on crutches in pain, the difficulty of sleeping at night because the fracture would not allow me to sleep on either side. So I would wake up with miserable lower back pain on the hour. I don't know what was worse .. the fracture or my back .. lol .. 8 weeks later it is all behind me YAY !!
    .......................

    Still .. I can't stress enough to visit a reputable bike shop. Let them know of your disabilities and they will measure you and fit you to a bike that won't hurt you down the road.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Have you given thought about a Ritchey adjustable stem? This is what was put on my Trek 520, recommended by my friend who manages a bike shop and I ordered my bike through.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-photo.jpg The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-photo.jpg

    This bike is my pride & joy. My friend whom I ordered this through (a Trek dealer) did upgrades/orders with physical my issues in mind. I LOVE this bike. The Ritchey stem brings the bars up and a bit closer to me for a more upright position .. and it has adjustable positions.

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Yup. BMX bars and an adjustable stem. I was aiming for the Ritchey, due to the way it secures the adjustment (haven't found anything close yet). Haven't determined if 100mm or 120mm will be required.
    I will be going for a drop-back seat post too.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dolo, frame crop.jpg 
Views:	623 
Size:	145.0 KB 
ID:	876150

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dolo, seat tube, BB.jpg 
Views:	604 
Size:	139.5 KB 
ID:	876151
    Can the stickers be removed?

    How long is the seatpost? Is it 27.2mm?

    Thanks for all the info!

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Yup. BMX bars and an adjustable stem. I was aiming for the Ritchey, due to the way it secures the adjustment (haven't found anything close yet). Haven't determined if 100mm or 120mm will be required.
    I will be going for a drop-back seat post too.
    Dayum .. a good post will cost more than what you paid for the bike!

  76. #76
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Man, for $225 I may pick one of those up myself if they ever come back in.
    I can't justify Pugsly money for the couple times a year I might ride a fat bike but I can justify $225.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Man, for $225 I may pick one of those up myself if they ever come back in.
    I can't justify Pugsly money for the couple times a year I might ride a fat bike but I can justify $225.
    HUH ?? Where do you get the fat bike is just a winter seasonal bike? Use your imagination and ride it whenever and WHEREVER. My Pugsley is great on city asphalt streets and a blast to ride .. and I can go places where my non-fatbike friends can't. Fortunately one friend is looking into getting .. probably a Mukluk hopefully sooner than later. He was so pumped when I told him that I bought the Pugs.

    Sorry .. but your excuse not investing in a Pugsley just doesn't hold water. I am riding my Pugs year around, not just in the winter.

  78. #78
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    It isn't an excuse, it is a reason. There is a difference.
    I know you can take a fat bike anywhere but my passion is not in owning a fat bike.

    FYI, I can also take my 29er in the snow. It does great in hard pack. It just didn't do so hot on the climbs when there was 4" on the ground. Still me and a friend were the tracks that day.

    Glad you like your Pugsly so much. You should, you bought it. However why does it seem to bother you so much that somebody could have just as much fun on a a bike that cost 1/10 the price or just doesn't need a bike of that caliber?
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    It isn't an excuse, it is a reason. There is a difference.
    I know you can take a fat bike anywhere but my passion is not in owning a fat bike.

    FYI, I can also take my 29er in the snow. It does great in hard pack. It just didn't do so hot on the climbs when there was 4" on the ground. Still me and a friend were the tracks that day.

    Glad you like your Pugsly so much. You should, you bought it. However why does it seem to bother you so much that somebody could have just as much fun on a a bike that cost 1/10 the price or just doesn't need a bike of that caliber?
    Well your reason was flawed. But if you don't want one .. that's different. You read me wrong. I have no problem with you enjoying whatever you buy, but there are those reading these forums looking for advice or just trying to figure which way to go. To infer that fat bikes are just good for winter just isn't so. To each their own .. but lets be honest what fat bikes can do.

  80. #80
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,762

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    Well your reason was flawed. But if you don't want one .. that's different. You read me wrong. I have no problem with you enjoying whatever you buy, but there are those reading these forums looking for advice or just trying to figure which way to go. To infer that fat bikes are just good for winter just isn't so. To each their own .. but lets be honest what fat bikes can do.
    Give it a rest! It's damn bike not a cult!
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  81. #81
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    I am aware of what they can do and also aware of what I personally want it for if I ever get one. If I get one, I me be able to justify spending up to $1k on it but not $2k+. Even then, it would be hard for me to justify that since I don't make a lot of money.
    I don't have that in any of my bikes and I ride the piss out of them and certainly would not spend it on a bike that would get ridden the least.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kris7047th's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    I am aware of what they can do and also aware of what I personally want it for if I ever get one. If I get one, I me be able to justify spending up to $1k on it but not $2k+. Even then, it would be hard for me to justify that since I don't make a lot of money.
    I don't have that in any of my bikes and I ride the piss out of them and certainly would not spend it on a bike that would get ridden the least.
    Umm .. I didn't spend $2,000. Got this way cheaper through REI, kids gave me a REI $200 gift card for Christmas, already had $111 coming back from REI in year end dividends AND since I ordered this bike days before Jan 1 and financed the bike on my REI Visa card I got 15% kick back dividend around $260 on top of everything else to cash out this month to apply to the bill. So after all was applied the final amount was around $1,100 for a $1,750 bike (including tax)
    You just have to know how to work it to save big on a better bike.

    I don't make a lot either .. retired on Soc Sec and drawing on an annuity to supplement. But I won't waste my money on a bike that won't last long. Did that before and learned my lesson .. was a wasted $200 plus bike that I rode maybe five times. It was not a fun bike to ride. I hated it. Had I the opportunity to test ride it .. I never would have bought it.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat85 View Post
    ...what kind of calipers are those? ...
    JAK-5, black, white, orange
    Detail:
    1. Casting alloy, one-piece design caliper body
    2. Optional spherical washer adapting structure, easy for caliper adjustment and mounting
    3. Mounting type:International standard mounting type & Post mounting type
    4. Compatable adapter : K1, K2, L1, L2, L3

    Next: can we buy pads for these?
    (other than in bulk from alibaba or aliexpress)

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tunalic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    507
    Nice Bike! I come close to getting a beast before ordering my On One. Probably would have gotten the Dolemite...sure looks to be a big improvement. I know what you are talking about in needing the upright position...it's all about comfort to me. I've change the bars of my Sawyer & Kona to Metropolis bars & ordered the On One with the On One Marys ....45 degree sweeps. Use to have adjustable stems on them also. Got a long set back seat post from Velo Orange on my Kona. Just got a tall nitto stem for my road bike for more upright riding on it! I've never cared that much about weight until I got this fat bike though....Just got it within a 1/2 lb of my Sawyer at 33lbs. Just makes it easy throwing it in the back of the truck. Fatty carbon fork coming in April!



    You should have no problem getting it under 40lbs.
    I'm about to order the 40+ lb Massif for my daughter...hopefully I can nock about 10 off of it!
    2016 Trek Farley 9.6
    2015 616 Muenzie
    2013 On One Fatty
    2011 Trek Sawyer

  85. #85
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    Umm .. I didn't spend $2,000. Got this way cheaper through REI, kids gave me a REI $200 gift card for Christmas, already had $111 coming back from REI in year end dividends AND since I ordered this bike days before Jan 1 and financed the bike on my REI Visa card I got 15% kick back dividend around $260 on top of everything else to cash out this month to apply to the bill. So after all was applied the final amount was around $1,100 for a $1,750 bike (including tax)
    You just have to know how to work it to save big on a better bike.

    I don't make a lot either .. retired on Soc Sec and drawing on an annuity to supplement. But I won't waste my money on a bike that won't last long. Did that before and learned my lesson .. was a wasted $200 plus bike that I rode maybe five times. It was not a fun bike to ride. I hated it. Had I the opportunity to test ride it .. I never would have bought it.
    I don't know if your persistence is because you love your bike so much that you think everyone should have one or because you are just so damn thick headed.

    Whether you realize it or not, you are being an elitist.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  86. #86
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    I was done after that post anyways.

    Back to the original topic and my original post in it.

    Nice bike dude, for $225 I may pic one up myself when they get back in stock.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tunalic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    507
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post

    for $225 I may pic one up myself when they get back in stock.
    Looks like they are back in stock but the price went up $75
    26" Mongoose Dolomite Mens Fat Tire Mountain Bike, Navy Blue/Red: Bikes & Riding Toys : Walmart.com
    2016 Trek Farley 9.6
    2015 616 Muenzie
    2013 On One Fatty
    2011 Trek Sawyer

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Man, for $225 I may pick one of those up myself if they ever come back in.
    I can't justify Pugsly money for the couple times a year I might ride a fat bike but I can justify $225.
    Too late. Dolomite on Walmart website is $299 now! Walmart appears to be playing Economics 101 supply and demand games. Well, guess what... customers looking at this bike are price sensitive and will not pay the new price.

  89. #89
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    That sucks but I have seen some fluctuations in price on the beast.
    Sometimes The Walmart site will even list the same items multiple times at different prices.
    It may come back down.

    They could be raising the price to create a false sale.

    I am in no rush anyways.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    291
    At $225 they had to be losing money. Plus I'm sure the bicycle buyers for Walmart are actual bicycle people. They probably visit these forums and are reading this thread


    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    98
    It sold out in three days. If you were the seller, what would you do? Probably be thinking - jackpot!!

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Tracer650 View Post
    At $225 they had to be losing money. Plus I'm sure the bicycle buyers for Walmart are actual bicycle people. They probably visit these forums and are reading this thread


    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    I highly doubt they were losing money at $225. If they wanted to price it higher they should have done it from the beginning. By introducing it at $$225 they set a price floor and customer expectations. And now we wait for the price to go back down.

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    ... It may come back down. ...
    Don't count on seeing $225 again.
    Look at the parts on a Beast, now add shifter, derailer, gears, disc brake hubs, discs, calipers & mounts, brake levers & cables.

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    13
    What happened to "Save money, live better."

    We all want to live better.

  95. #95
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    988
    Glad the price went up; now it'll be a little easier to eschew something I don't need in socal.

  96. #96
    Is dang happy!
    Reputation: Mr. Doom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,237
    It will probably go on sale at some point in the future but that weak freewheel axle, cheesy BB/crankset and ridiculously heavy tires make it useless to me even as a "project" bike.
    The new low end fatties from Bikesdirict coming out this summer are a much better investment IMO.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  97. #97
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    I agree, if you are going to try and upgrade it, you are kind of shooting yourself in the foot.
    If you want a cheap bike, get a cheap bike, ride it and love it for what it is. Just don't try and turn it in to an expensive bike.

    Now if you have old parts laying around collecting dust as many of us do then sure, put them to good use.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,202
    Quote Originally Posted by dieseli View Post
    Can the stickers be removed?
    How long is the seatpost? Is it 27.2mm?
    Stickers can be removed.
    But once you get the bike in front of you, stop and look first. They're nicely done and make a great contrast to the paint. Once off, you can't put them back on.
    (I always remove the stickers from bikes, even before I grease the bearings and adjust the brakes. These I've left on. This probably won't last, but I can't bring myself to do it.)

    Seat post measures 10.5" below the seat clamp.
    Post is labelled 028. The diameter of the painted seat post measures between 28.35mm and 28.50mm, typically 28.45mm (to nearest .05).

  99. #99
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    I am guessing he is more interested in removing the stickers so people don't know it is a Mongoose and looks/contrast have little to di with it.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    I am guessing he is more interested in removing the stickers so people don't know it is a Mongoose and looks/contrast have little to di with it.
    No, he removes the stickers so you wont cry when he rides past you on the trail and you realize he only paid $225, while your pedaling $8k of depreciating expectations.

    Name:  arrogant prick.png
Views: 11176
Size:  46.3 KB

Page 1 of 29 1234511 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Rolf Dolomite Wheel set for sale
    By Wiplash in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-13-2013, 03:38 PM
  2. Semi-rad.com took a jab at us!
    By jmmUT in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-15-2013, 10:30 PM
  3. Rolf Dolomite Disc cracked rear rim?! WTF?
    By Wasmachineman NL in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 01:09 AM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-02-2012, 10:57 PM
  5. Semi OT
    By pisgahproductions in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-11-2011, 02:48 PM

Members who have read this thread: 119

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •