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  1. #2901
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    Anybody looking for handlebars with more sweep....the "Origin8 Bat Wing MTB Handlebar" works fairly well. They have a 25 degree sweep angle, 660mm wide, and a 31.8mm clamp.
    I went with a Truvativ Hussefelt Stem (40mm length). The bars are about $40...cheapest I could find with 25 degree sweep angle and the stem is about $25. The bars are flat i.e. no rise...you can add a stem riser if you want to raise them up, I did.

    The 660mm width is a little narrow for downhill but works great for riding in the woods so you don't slam your knuckles in to trees .

  2. #2902
    omi
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    Thanks for the info Canoe/Bullfrog. I did read half the internet and this forum seems to be the best of the bunch. It's just intimidating as this is the first bike in 25 years for me, just to cruise on paved back streets with my kid.

    I see so many acronyms and informed wording here that it's like a new language. I assume Clyde is a big person in any way? That I am if so. Tall and wide .

    Per the info here I will service all you mentioned (or, have it done to be honest). The front wheel is at the shop as I write this being packed. Over time, the usual total transformation of upgrades will happen but it really is easy for me stock too.

    I looked at some of the saddle recommends and I really need a huge saddle to be comfy. I'm using a pretty large schwinn 11.5" now, but I can bend the metal rails it sits on with one hand. Seated it stays just fine but does anyone have a super comfy, large mens saddle to recommend? (I grew up with banana seats!). I'm about to weld a motorcycle seat on this thing..

    Thanks!

    Edit:

    Exactly like what was just posted while I posted. The stock handlebars are in the dirt. I'm putting half my weight to the headset lunging forward. I need it up like 6 inches or more and toward me. I just need to decrypt the language
    Last edited by omi; 06-01-2018 at 07:56 AM. Reason: Posted while I posted

  3. #2903
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    Try a Nashbar SC1 Comfort Saddle, not the largest but comfy: https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...e-nb-sc1s-base

    The cloud 9 seats look good but are pretty wimpy, I bent mine.

    Yep...Clyde is short for Clydesdale i.e. a LARGE horse...or person. I am one as well.

  4. #2904
    omi
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    Ahh okay.

    I'm using something that is bigger already, 330mm https://tinyurl.com/y84mhq2k Schwinn Breeze Comfort Foam saddle. It's comfy, I just don't want to be out riding and find out the hard way I'm walking the fat bike home from a few miles away . So if anyone knows of something in that 330mm/13in (could be 11in, doesn't specify which dimension is width/length), and is unusually strong, that's what I need! (Along with brakes, dual crank, brakes, tires/tubes, .......)

  5. #2905
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    I tried the largest Cloud 9 which is 12x12: New 12" Cloud 9 Gel Bicycle Seat and I like my Nashbar SC-1 better (mine measures 8.5" wide and 11" long).

    Tires depends on the surface you are going to be riding...I have had really good luck with Maxxis. Off road I'd go with the FBF/FBR 26x4.00 with a 60 tpi casing. 60 is stronger and more puncture resistant than 120 but the ride isn't quite as plush..I take care of that with air pressure. The tread pattern is too aggressive for pavement. Anybody have a recommendation for pavement tires?

    Brakes...first upgrade your rotors front and rear to 180mm. Your stock brakes will work better just keep them adjusted. When they get to be too aggravating or you want even more...go to hydraulics. My personal preference is shimano. Here is an option: Shimano BR-M395 Disc Brake | Jenson USA Jenson is pretty helpful if you need it.

  6. #2906
    omi
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    I guess it comes down to if anyone knows of some kind of rating or method to know if a seat is strong. The feature points don't say that it strives to be stronger than a typical seat. The two metal rails might be just the same size, same problem. Do those bars have a name or a desirable material stronger than steel? These are the odd niche things I struggle to find.

    Are the Maxxis lighter than stock dolos? I see everyone mention dropping upwards of 7lbs just from tire and tube alone. Are those street tires and/or recommended because they're lighter?

    The bike shop mentioned these bikes have a low aggressive handlebar for a reason. They're meant for hard riding. It might be wrong, but I already have the bike, so is there a hybrid/comfy handlebar that most people use outside standard bmx handlebars? Something that can come close to turning it a bit more like a cruiser? The bmx handlebars make it look a bit strange to me, but who knows, it might be awesome and finally get me sitting more upright. Right now it's just too much pressure on my hands.

  7. #2907
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    Quote Originally Posted by omi View Post
    ... I see everyone mention dropping upwards of 7lbs just from tire and tube alone. Are those street tires and/or recommended because they're lighter? ...
    Reducing the weight is nice as you're not carrying it around, and you'd have faster acceleration, but neither is the major reason for upgrading tire & tube. The primary benefit is greatly reduced rolling resistance. Lowered mass of tires means less robbing of energy as the tire deforms and reforms into/outof the contact patch as it rolls along. Lots of tire choices.

    For the same reason, people like going Getto Tubeless (so instead of a big heavy tube, or a normal tube, there's no tube robbing energy as it deforms and reforms as the wheel rolls along. For your usage, don't bother with Getto Tubeless, and it's a pain to do on a Dolo anyway due to the tire bead seat.

    So ditch the stock tubes; check through the various recommendations, which may vary depending on the tires you chose.

    Quote Originally Posted by omi View Post
    ... so is there a hybrid/comfy handlebar that most people use outside standard bmx handlebars? Something that can come close to turning it a bit more like a cruiser? The bmx handlebars make it look a bit strange to me, but who knows, it might be awesome and finally get me sitting more upright. Right now it's just too much pressure on my hands.
    You can try all sorts, but many people have fit issues with the swept cruiser bars. Can't make the turn when you can't swing the bar through your own body.

    People with the issues you describe usually eventually end up using BMX bars. If you're worried about looking a little weird, remember, it is a fat bike. And who cares if it means you get to ride it without damaging your wrists.

    BMX bars are not all the same. Check out their options.
    I use BMX and an adjustable stem. Gives me max adjust-ability of the location of the grips and the angle of the grips.
    There were some important issues with which style of clamps in the adjustable stem, but I can't find where I put the notes or images.
    (and unfortunately, all of the helpful links became useless with one of the updates to mtbr)
    ah; found this one
    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite

    You could look at the Ergon GC1 style cork/rubber grips, but with BMX bars it's at different angles and you're no longer putting your upper body weight on your hands, just part of the weight of your arms.

    With Clydes, don't forget stopping power.
    Even upgrading one brake to a BB7 and 180 or ~200 would provide a lot of improvement. Normally braking is primarily done on the front, but with a Clyde sitting up straight, I'd be tempted to put the best on the rear.
    I cheated and just got a set of BB7 on sale for the front and rear.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  8. #2908
    omi
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    Ahh I thought the extra weight added centrifugal force which slowed it down overall, didn't think about the plyability. That makes sense and I'll hunt down something less nobby/offroad. It has so much now it sounds like a rumble strip.

    My brakes were misaligned and I already noticed it bending the rotor, digging into the pad at an angle, cutting it up. That was painfully quick! Upgrade and calibration time for sure.

    Thanks for the link and yes I do agree turning will be compromised, and wrists are worth protecting more than anything. Bmx it is!

    Thanks again Canoe, time to go shopping!

  9. #2909
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    Quote Originally Posted by omi View Post
    Ahh I thought the extra weight added centrifugal force which slowed it down overall, didn't think about the plyability.
    The greater mass compared to non-fat can mean that the rotational momentum keeps the fat wheel rotating over minor obstacles that slow down non-fat bikes. But you're not going on a trail.
    The pliability is also affected by 30 TPI, 60 TPI or 120 TPI casing.
    Knobs on pavement are known for causing more deforming than one would get from a street tire.

    Seats...
    Before you spend money, you should do some research on what is currently known about bike seats. Some of what has been determined is counter intuitive. Bigger & foamier is not necessarily best, but might be.
    And some seats it's varying degrees and type of cushion (or not) on plate held by springs, others the seat is sorta like a hammock, and you have the option of a seat post suspension/shock. A Clyde friend has a $12K road bike with a seat that is carbon fibre that looks like a shoe horn, and he swears it's the most comfortable seat he's ever had. Of course he may just be trying to con me into trying to ride it...
    (I'll be trying a long Loaf seat for my cargo fat bike)
    BUT, where your weight will be transferring to the seat will be changing once you're in an upright riding posture. What you find most comfortable as a seat right now could change dramatically once you've got BMX bars positioned where you want them.

    Unless you have a clear determination of a choice, I'd suggest spending your money in steps, to reduce the likelihood of needing to spend it twice. Used bike repair co-ops are a great source of cheap stuff to try out before you buy nice, if that's needed. Thinking seats & bars.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  10. #2910
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    lol
    Here's a seat I found at the bike co-op, on my 26" 47mm trials rim.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-fat-bike-needs-fat-seat-sm.jpg

    If refurbishing a old rusted seat of questionable strength, or it's a newer seat with a thin plate, you can epoxy support stays/ribs onto its underside.

    Should put that on my friend's 12K road bike and his shoe horn on my Dolo and go to the July bike meet.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  11. #2911
    omi
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    All wise advice.

    Is there a rail rating? It seems the same diameter seat to seat. At my size no springs matter, ~400lb. Sheer strength is all I seek, along with comfort. My legs push this tiny 7 speed stock dolo with no effort at all.

    200ish (mm) rotors and bmx handlebars are next. Aside a Dick's Sporting Goods tune to repack front/back, bracket and headset.

    I really can't find, and need, a super saddle.

    Thanks!

  12. #2912
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    Quote Originally Posted by omi View Post
    All wise advice.
    Is there a rail rating? It seems the same diameter seat to seat. At my size no springs matter, ~400lb. Sheer strength is all I seek, along with comfort. My legs push this tiny 7 speed stock dolo with no effort at all.
    200ish (mm) rotors and bmx handlebars are next. Aside a Dick's Sporting Goods tune to repack front/back, bracket and headset.
    I really can't find, and need, a super saddle.
    Thanks!
    I've never heard of a rail rating. The other issue will be the strength of the seat post, particularly if it is extended.
    You may need to consider a Loaf Seat. Like a Banana Seat, only shaped more like a loaf of bread, somewhat tapered down towards the front. Google.
    The front goes on the seat post, with a pair of stays going down to the rear axle. I'm using aluminum hospital crutches for mine, but I'd use steel tube for yours. Go right to the axle, other than to the frame.
    A stock Loaf Seat would have your weight too far back on the bike. You'd need to move the seat post attachment point somewhat back on the seat.
    However, you can build your own. In your case, your height will determine distance from hip to pedals, so you can build it shorter (or match your seat length needs), the 'plate' can be plywood on a thin steel plate for load distribution of the seat post. Quality dense upholstery foam with an outdoor 'leather' cloth over it. Google Rat Rod bikes.
    If there's a place that makes seats for motorcycles near you, you should talk to them.

    If you stand up on the pedals, or use those strong legs to power/punch the pedals, you may (should expect to?) bend the stock Dolo bottom bracket spindle. So don't be surprised if that happens.
    Early on, someone found some harder spindles. However, for your use I'd suggest looking back in more recent threads for the replacement cartridge people are using. It's too short to work stock, but someone discovered that with swept crank arms (model mentioned in the posts) it is reported to clear the rear stays.

    All of the cheap bikes use freewheel, which means the freewheel hub. Those that end up bending the axle through weight or a jump reported that they sometimes got away with loosening the axle nuts and rotating the axle so the bend was then up. Maybe o.k. for a one-of event, but metal fatigue will catch up with that, quicker with a bigger bend or repeated bending. Expect to have to go with a rear freehub (that can take the weight) and a cassette. At the time you do that, get quality spokes and nipples (those are cheap).

    MAKE sure that there are no loose spokes. You don't want the wheel doing a taco (folding).
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  13. #2913
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    So it's not just taking the weight, but how the seat supports you. No telling what will work.

    Some of the old motorcycle style seats did have (normally) useless seat springs as they were too strong. May work for you.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-loaf-seat.jpg

    A loaf seat style mounting should allow you to use a variety of seat shapes supported in that manner (takes away having all of the load on the seat post). The Rat Rod mod world also has people making custom seat posts out of strong stock, should you find a suitable seat that only needs the seat post to mount.

    And there's some odd ball style seats. All sorts out there, off the shelf and custom. I am NOT suggesting one with a seat back (but who knows), but those seats were advertised with such.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-moon-seat.jpg

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    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-bikes004-5.jpg
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  14. #2914
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    Quote Originally Posted by omi View Post
    ...200ish (mm) rotors...
    Will need new mounts for the brakes to fit the larger diameter rotors.
    It may be time to get one 200ish rotor and one new caliper that is capable of grabbing it well, reliably and without doing damage. In your case, if upgrading one, I'd go for the rear wheel. You will have a lot of momentum, so upgrading both front & rear is a very reasonable choice if you have the budget.

    I like the BB7, but they have to be setup correctly, which usually requires a (surprisingly specific) procedure be followed. But then I like playing with gear, which is why I bought the BB7's more expensive adjustable levers while knowing that I'd run them at full pull all the time anyway. I'll be going to TRP Spyke mechanical calipers (Spyke are the MTB ones) gripping ~200 for my cargo fat.

    Since the time I got my BB7s, there are others' favourite brakes that have been suggested more recently in this thread, including a hydroponic (really spell check?) hydraulic set or two. I have no experience with those, but if the more recent postings' brakes are as low and easy maintenance as people have posted, they're likely a better choice for your use than the BB7.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  15. #2915
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    Do take a look at this post, thread and around the Clydesdale/tall forum.
    Best seat for big guys?

    https://www.sq-lab.com/en/sqlab-ergo...ct-saddle.html

    Do remember that you'll be sitting up, so the style of seat that fits you best may be different, but I've heard tons about seat vs. bone width in recent years.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  16. #2916
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Do take a look at this post, thread and around the Clydesdale/tall forum.
    Best seat for big guys?

    https://www.sq-lab.com/en/sqlab-ergo...ct-saddle.html

    Do remember that you'll be sitting up, so the style of seat that fits you best may be different, but I've heard tons about seat vs. bone width in recent years.
    WOW!
    That link someone posted in that thread sure is great. Take a good look around that site.
    Includes increasing the seat width based on upright posture.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  17. #2917
    omi
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    Thanks a bunch for all this information consolidated! I've run into some electrical issues on my car (might need the bike more than I think oy) so I haven't had time to mess with the bike just yet. And this weekend won't be a riding weekend, like last, all rain.

    I'll have to consume all this info on my computer. That's more than enough to kill a cell battery!

    Dick's Sporting Goods is where I had my front hub repacked. It spins for days and the little old man working there gave me a ton of info. They do a full seasonal service (front/rear hub, bottom bracket (apparently the pedal axle?), brakes and all torque and calibration, for $40! Includes repacking, so less for me since I did the front already. That seems extremely cheap, but this guy knows his stuff. And he just loves working on bikes. No pits in the hub or bearings. All regreased and spins for dayyyyys on a light spin. I actually managed to get an honest craigslist buy, 100 for a dolo when no store has it and it is actually almost never used.

    Sorry for the late response. I will read it all and after I get the bike tuned I'll respond if anything interesting shows up. Overall, very happy with the stock bike (except seat, handlebars, pedals, brakes and 7 gears), but I always knew it was a strong frame and a place to start learning. For street and in low gear, I can even seat peddle on light grass slopes. But I do need more torque and less weight. More of the loss should be me than the bike

    Thanks again!

  18. #2918
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullfrog123 View Post
    I tried the largest Cloud 9 which is 12x12: New 12" Cloud 9 Gel Bicycle Seat and I like my Nashbar SC-1 better (mine measures 8.5" wide and 11" long).

    Tires depends on the surface you are going to be riding...I have had really good luck with Maxxis. Off road I'd go with the FBF/FBR 26x4.00 with a 60 tpi casing. 60 is stronger and more puncture resistant than 120 but the ride isn't quite as plush..I take care of that with air pressure. The tread pattern is too aggressive for pavement. Anybody have a recommendation for pavement tires?

    Brakes...first upgrade your rotors front and rear to 180mm. Your stock brakes will work better just keep them adjusted. When they get to be too aggravating or you want even more...go to hydraulics. My personal preference is shimano. Here is an option: Shimano BR-M395 Disc Brake | Jenson USA Jenson is pretty helpful if you need it.
    Well I can tell you what seat NOT to get...the Selle Royal Drifter Relaxed Saddle: https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...addle-sr-drift The curvature of the nose hits you in the wrong place...if you know what I mean. If you adjust the nose down enough so that it doesn't hurt then the seat is tilted so far forward you want to slide off of the front.

    I know it isn't the largest seat around but the Nashbar SC-1 Comfort Saddle: https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...e-nb-sc1s-base is the most comfortable I have tried. The Cloud 9 seats "look" comfy but I had tried a couple of them including the largest one they make (which is pretty big) and the Nashbar sc-1 is a little more comfortable...not as big but a little more comfortable. Here is the Cloud 9 seat I tried: New 12" Cloud 9 Gel Bicycle Seat

  19. #2919
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    I thought I was going to ride mine around again this weekend. Almost everything was stripped off the frame last fall, and all I needed to do was put it back together with a new fork and headset. It was going well until it came time to put the handlebar back on, and oops, I forgot I had thrown the handlebar and headset away. At least this gives me an excuse for some upgrades in this area, along with new pedals. It'll probably drop about a pound, which isn't much compared to the heavy factory tubes and tires I'm still using. I'll part together a parts list when it's put together.

  20. #2920
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullfrog123 View Post
    Well I can tell you what seat NOT to get...the Selle Royal Drifter Relaxed Saddle: https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...addle-sr-drift The curvature of the nose hits you in the wrong place...if you know what I mean. If you adjust the nose down enough so that it doesn't hurt then the seat is tilted so far forward you want to slide off of the front.

    I know it isn't the largest seat around but the Nashbar SC-1 Comfort Saddle: https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...e-nb-sc1s-base is the most comfortable I have tried. The Cloud 9 seats "look" comfy but I had tried a couple of them including the largest one they make (which is pretty big) and the Nashbar sc-1 is a little more comfortable...not as big but a little more comfortable. Here is the Cloud 9 seat I tried: New 12" Cloud 9 Gel Bicycle Seat
    Guys and gals, for the love of whatever you hold dear, spend some time reading the threads re saddle fit.
    Go to a shop that has an ass-o-meter and actually find out what size of saddle you should be trying to find. Within each size there are many options, more padding, less padding, gel, cutouts, suited for upright, moderate or aggressive racing positions.
    But if you intend to ride your bike further than the corner store, for any time or distance, almost no one will be well served by those 12 inch wide sponge mattresses.
    Very few people would actually need a saddle much wider than 155-160mm.
    Your weight is actually supported by your sit bones. So after anything less than a short commute all that excess padding will only serve to irritate the soft tissue surrounding the sitbones as they sink into all that excess padding trying to find something to support them.
    Sure a firmer normal saddle will take some time to adjust too, but in the long run you will be better off.

  21. #2921
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    Guys and gals, for the love of whatever you hold dear, spend some time reading the threads re saddle fit.
    Go to a shop that has an ass-o-meter and actually find out what size of saddle you should be trying to find. Within each size there are many options, more padding, less padding, gel, cutouts, suited for upright, moderate or aggressive racing positions.
    But if you intend to ride your bike further than the corner store, for any time or distance, almost no one will be well served by those 12 inch wide sponge mattresses.
    Very few people would actually need a saddle much wider than 155-160mm.
    Your weight is actually supported by your sit bones. So after anything less than a short commute all that excess padding will only serve to irritate the soft tissue surrounding the sitbones as they sink into all that excess padding trying to find something to support them.
    Sure a firmer normal saddle will take some time to adjust too, but in the long run you will be better off.
    Yup!

    I guess they didn't bother checking out what was at the links provided over at the Clydesdales/tall forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    Do take a look at this post, thread and around the Clydesdale/tall forum.
    Best seat for big guys?

    https://www.sq-lab.com/en/sqlab-ergo...ct-saddle.html

    Do remember that you'll be sitting up, so the style of seat that fits you best may be different, but I've heard tons about seat vs. bone width in recent years.
    Surprisingly easy to measure yourself too.
    And to adjust that measurement for riding posture.
    And to check the curve of a seat for matching that adjusted measurement.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  22. #2922
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    Is there any reason I shouldn't take apart my bottom bracket with sealed bearings and try to make it work with the YST bearings?

  23. #2923
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    Quote Originally Posted by leaftye View Post
    Is there any reason I shouldn't take apart my bottom bracket with sealed bearings and try to make it work with the YST bearings?
    What sealed bearing?

    YST with zero preload is amazing, BUT you're stuck with the original long and too soft spindle. Too many end up bent.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  24. #2924
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoe View Post
    What sealed bearing?

    YST with zero preload is amazing, BUT you're stuck with the original long and too soft spindle. Too many end up bent.
    Oops, not sealed. This thing.



    I'm hoping it's the same spindle, and that I don't screw it up if it's different because I don't know if I can get another one.

  25. #2925
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    Quote Originally Posted by leaftye View Post
    Oops, not sealed. This thing.

    I'm hoping it's the same spindle, and that I don't screw it up if it's different because I don't know if I can get another one.
    Well, that would certainly screw it up. That's not a spindle, that's a cartridge bearing. Someone has already solved the issue of the original weak spindle and bearing.

    Are your crank arms straight or curved outwards?
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  26. #2926
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    Seats...yes again . Found a little discussion back on page 5 where somebody else liked the Nashbar SC-1 seat. I still stand by it as my #1 for relatively upright riding comfort. Plus it isn't sooo big that it allows you to stand and ride fairly aggressively if that is something you want to do.

    Bottom bracket removal...it can be next to impossible, I speak from experience. Check out this video...I ended up making a similar tool and soakinig my threaded section with Aerokroil penetrating oil and it came apart fairly easily without an impact wrench: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9oIUmdI5JU

    Don't get in a hurry they can be tough to loosen. When I say soaked, I mean I removed the spindle and turned the bike on its side and had a plastic container with the penetrating oil in it so that the fixed cup was immersed in the oil. I let it soak for several days. Then by using the tool in the video and a crescent wrench, it came apart fairly easily.

  27. #2927
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    Okay, hands off the bottom bracket for now. I didn't consider that the shell would add stiffness, and didn't know the shaft was prone to bending. So that's nice a difference for the Costco version. Unfortunately I realized you guys had been saying the Mongoose version had 100mm rims, and the Costco only has 80mm rims.

    I'm waiting for my handlebar to be delivered today, but I'm estimating a 1.3 pound savings from swapping pedals, stem and handlebar.

  28. #2928
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    Where to buy a rear axle for the Dolomite?
    Bill

    '95 Raleigh 400, STX-RC (road, touring)
    '00 Santa Cruz Superlight, XTR (Cross Country Mtb)
    Northern N.J.

  29. #2929
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    Quote Originally Posted by INABIL View Post
    Where to buy a rear axle for the Dolomite?
    Woo boy.

    Pacific Cycles is likely the only source of the stock part.
    At one point, someone had a limited run of either rear axles or BB spindles. It's been too long for me, I forget. Search. Or maybe someone will chime in.

    If you can't get one, you can get one machined, and hopefully out of better axle material. This could cost, and you still have a freewheel hub, same quality bearings, same quality seat, flange, etc..

    If not, then it's new hub time.

    The Dolo in the (semi) wild - Mongoose Dolomite-freehub-vs.-freewheel-red-bearing.jpg

    You can get a new freewheel hub, and repeat the issue of having the drive side load on bearings that are well inboard of the frame. (Red dots for bearings in diagram)
    Or you can get a freehub and a cassette, and not have the problem again, while having better quality and a lot more choice in gears on a cassette.

    p.s.
    You'd get to buy spokes & nipples too, and learn how to use a spoke calculator and how to build a wheel.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  30. #2930
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    Thanks, it's a neighbors bike and doesn't want to up grade. I used to work in a machine shop and that seams to be the expensive way (tooling).
    If I can't get stocker I'll look for a 190 mm quick release.
    Bill

    '95 Raleigh 400, STX-RC (road, touring)
    '00 Santa Cruz Superlight, XTR (Cross Country Mtb)
    Northern N.J.

  31. #2931
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    Quote Originally Posted by INABIL View Post
    ... If I can't get stocker I'll look for a 190 mm quick release.
    Make sure they understand that another stock part is just a stop gap: same soft stock part, same freewheel design.

    "Quick release" meaning a QR "freewheel hub" or a QR "freehub hub"?
    If their weight or riding style meant that they trashed one axle, then not a good ideal to get another freewheel.
    Crazy on this ship of fools...

  32. #2932
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    Quick Release axle.
    Bill

    '95 Raleigh 400, STX-RC (road, touring)
    '00 Santa Cruz Superlight, XTR (Cross Country Mtb)
    Northern N.J.

  33. #2933
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    Good luck finding a 190mm QR axle. You might be able to get one from a Minnesota fatbike. I think they had a 190mm QR at one time, but I don't think they offered the axle seperately, only a whole wheel. And if you try to get a new hub, the 36h hole hub will be a challenge to find in a 190mm length too. Better to get a 36h 170mm hub and bend the frame a little bit. Ultimately, I ended up getting a bikesdirect fatbike because the rear hub kept failing.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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