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  1. #1
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    Do Fat Bikes shred single track?

    They look fun, seen videos of bad ass riders shredding them, have seen some cruising along local trails. For the experienced fat bikers out there, do they shred single track and take drops like a skinny tire mountain bike?

  2. #2
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    If you are good rider and the bike is setup for it, yes. They are awesome shredding machines ,

  3. #3
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    Yes!

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    I find on techy stuff they are awesome, climbs tough stuff well, and planting them into a corner is very fun.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    I find on techy stuff they are awesome, climbs tough stuff well, and planting them into a corner is very fun.
    all of this is true. I shred every bit of trail I can on mine. It is the most I have ever had on 2 wheels.

  6. #6
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    Well...

    I'm not sure about drops, but I am starting to feel like I can ride my Fatty harder than my Niner in most cases. Climbing, not so much, but I always hate that.
    Most people ply the Well Trodden Path. A few seek a different way, and leave a Trail behind.
    - John Hajny, a.k.a. TrailMaker

  7. #7
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    Back when I was a strong rider I could kill it on a fatty, now not so much. I hope to change that someday and to once again leave the skinny bike all lonely parked in the garage. Short answer yes

  8. #8
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    Do Fat Bikes shred single track?

    Yes. I'm a light guy, but on pedally stuff and climbs I can keep up with the fastest in my group, on some descents I'll get dropped. I take drops of 2' or so, but that's all I'll take on any bike.


    "You're like a Ferrari engine driving a dump truck"

  9. #9
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    It's difficult to get used to how hard you can corner on the fat bike. Traction is amazing. It is definitely fun to smoke your buddies on their traditional bikes! That said, I am still faster on a given loop with my FS 29er.
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyknobbies View Post
    For the experienced fat bikers out there, do they shred single track and take drops like a skinny tire mountain bike?
    No. They shred single track and take drops like a rigid fat tire mountain bike.

    If you would have fun riding a rigid skinny MTB on your trails you'll have fun riding a fatbike on your trails.

    You'll also be able to explore places your skinny MTB would struggle with and ride in the winter if you get snow in your neck of the woods.

    Ideally get a test ride on your local trails so you can see for yourself what is what.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post

    If you would have fun riding a rigid skinny MTB on your trails you'll have fun riding a fatbike on your trails.
    Rigid skinny MTB's are only fun for masochists. I take mine out once in a while to remind myself why suspension was invented.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    Rigid skinny MTB's are only fun for masochists. I take mine out once in a while to remind myself why suspension was invented.
    I would agree. My point to the OP was if you aren't keen on shredding your local trails on a rigid MTB don't assume you'll enjoy doing it on a rigid fatbike - just because a world class rider did it in a video.
    Safe riding,

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I would agree. My point to the OP was if you aren't keen on shredding your local trails on a rigid MTB don't assume you'll enjoy doing it on a rigid fatbike - just because a world class rider did it in a video.
    That is a good point. I have a fat frame to build, was thinking if it is going to be a fun shredder, I would sell my current whip (hardtail with big fork up front) and just go FAT.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyknobbies View Post
    That is a good point. I have a fat frame to build, was thinking if it is going to be a fun shredder, I would sell my current whip (hardtail with big fork up front) and just go FAT.
    Build up the fatty and see what happens. If you are happy trailing riding on it then sell the other bike. If not keep both.
    Safe riding,

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  15. #15
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    I've been splitting my time riding single track with fat bike and my rigid 29er.

    I'm faster on the 29er on both the ups and downs and it's toss up which gives a more comfortable ride. The rigid 29er with 2.4 tires is so much more nimble I can steer around hits rather than tank over everything. It's also 14 pounds lighter, so it's much less work to speed up after slowing down for an obstacle. I'm definitely more "worked" after riding the fat bike on the same trail.

    The fat bike ride is really fun in it's own ways. I especially enjoy cornering fast and being able to completely relax through messy loose gravel sections.

    if you want to "shred" single track, it's probably not the best tool for the job. If you are looking for a fun ride and big grins, fat bikes are great.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Build up the fatty and see what happens. If you are happy trailing riding on it then sell the other bike. If not keep both.
    if you can afford it, this is great advice. a fattie is a great addition to most stables. and if you build it up and don't like it you can always sell it to a poor bloke like me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teton29er View Post

    if you want to "shred" single track, it's probably not the best tool for the job. If you are looking for a fun ride and big grins, fat bikes are great.
    This!
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  18. #18
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    My Pugs sure shreds it...then plasters it all to my legs.

  19. #19
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    They certainly do shred single track, but be forewarned, they are not necessarily fast. Fun, heIl's to the yeah! Fast? Not so much.
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    Any bike will have +/- over another bike ... all I know is when I pull up with my 4.8s on hunjos and get the smirky "wrong bike" or "so are those tires slower" comments, I just smile and reply "speed got more to do with the rider than the bike." With a fattie, you gotta CRUSH everything you ride. Plain and simple as that. Don't compare your fattie to your hardtail, compare your fat bike to THEIR hardtail! I huck the fattie harder than my other bikes cause I'm DRIVEN on my fat.

    Besides this, know that a fat bike ridden on the edge is like nothing else. When I'm flicking my hard tail around imagining how rad that last tire drag musta looked, I'm just another rider out there. When I'm airing the big rubber out though, I get nods and "daaaaang"s confirming how gnarly I'm riding. That is the fat bike advantage.

  21. #21
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    Do Fat Bikes shred single track?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    They certainly do shred single track, but be forewarned, they are not necessarily fast. Fun, heIl's to the yeah! Fast? Not so much.
    Wrong. Not as fast in some situations, sure, but in others just as fast...or faster. And not just in snow....which is obvious. I regularly trade off KOMs with people on Ti hard tails, carbon full suss, whatever they ride...why? My legs. If your fatty isn't fast, than your legs aren't strong enough...bottom line.


    "You're like a Ferrari engine driving a dump truck"

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schott View Post
    Wrong. Not as fast in some situations, sure, but in others just as fast...or faster. And not just in snow....which is obvious. I regularly trade off KOMs with people on Ti hard tails, carbon full suss, whatever they ride...why? My legs. If your fatty isn't fast, than your legs aren't strong enough...bottom line.



    "You're like a Ferrari engine driving a dump truck"
    Right on Schott! couldn't agree more!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schott View Post
    Wrong. Not as fast in some situations, sure, but in others just as fast...or faster. And not just in snow....which is obvious. I regularly trade off KOMs with people on Ti hard tails, carbon full suss, whatever they ride...why? My legs. If your fatty isn't fast, than your legs aren't strong enough...bottom line.


    "You're like a Ferrari engine driving a dump truck"
    So True.

    I don't have my fattie yet, but I ride a long travel 29er on XC trails a lot. I always get looks and comments from the lycra boyz; "overkill for here don't you think", yet they don't say much when I leave them in the dust on the climbs.... it's all about the rider ;-)

    My sole purpose of buying a fatbike is to shred single track - I haven't ever ridden one, but I like to try new stuff. I hope for it to be tons of fun along with a challenge to push my legs harder. I did order one with front suspension which seems to be more easily available these days.

    Get one and go out and shred imo ;-)

    Have a super weekend
    Age is a state of mind

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyknobbies View Post
    That is a good point. I have a fat frame to build, was thinking if it is going to be a fun shredder, I would sell my current whip (hardtail with big fork up front) and just go FAT.
    In my stable I have a fattie, and a Transition Trans Am hardtail with a Lyric fork with Avalanche internals [hardtail with a big fork up front]. There is no comparison between the two. I can slam into stuff with the Trans Am almost as hard as I can with my 6 inch full suspension El Guapo, but there is NO WAY I can hit the trail as hard with my Pugsly. The two bikes are no way equivalent.
    That being said, my pugsly outclimbs all my bikes, corners hard, rides crazy technical stuff, and is a blast to ride. It is not a replacement for what you have, it is it's own thing.
    ****

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sattvic View Post
    So True.

    I don't have my fattie yet, but I ride a long travel 29er on XC trails a lot. I always get looks and comments from the lycra boyz; "overkill for here don't you think", yet they don't say much when I leave them in the dust on the climbs.... it's all about the rider ;-)

    My sole purpose of buying a fatbike is to shred single track - I haven't ever ridden one, but I like to try new stuff. I hope for it to be tons of fun along with a challenge to push my legs harder. I did order one with front suspension which seems to be more easily available these days.

    Get one and go out and shred imo ;-)

    Have a super weekend
    I'm in the same boat, but I ride a 9kg rigid SS 29er, and think that a rigid fattie would be just the ticket to funsville.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  26. #26
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    I feel like I get beat up much more on my 26" hardtail than my fatbike but I clock faster times skinny. It's pretty close though and carrying a 1.6 kg brick (alfine8) on the back of the fatbike has quite a bit to do with it IMO (it's damn hilly here - makes mountain goats cry!).

    Bring on the carbon XX1!

    One thing about fat tires is the abundance of riding confidence they give, it's most notifiable when hoping back on a skinny after a month or two fat.

  27. #27
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    Singletracks? Go fattie! Unless your singletracks have lots of >4ft drops (which can be done but I would really prefer bringing out my other bikes for those kind of riding)

    As pointed out by others.. you need some legs. Been using my heavy EG with coil front and back for a few years as a do-it-all so wasn't a problem whenever I'm riding my fattie.

    Nothing fancy, a 1st gen Pugsley and while that steep head angle might be a concern coming down, its really a lot more stable than a 26 with an equivalent HTA.

    Overall (for me) its easier with a rigid on fat tires than say a hardtail with wimpy 100mm forks be it whatever wheel size. Especially when the going gets wet and muddy where suspension actually becomes more of a liability than help. Or if you veer off the singletracks and plough through grass and stuff-- which I think many fattie owners tend to do in the "spirit of exploration"

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schott View Post
    Wrong. Not as fast in some situations, sure, but in others just as fast...or faster. And not just in snow....which is obvious. I regularly trade off KOMs with people on Ti hard tails, carbon full suss, whatever they ride...why? My legs. If your fatty isn't fast, than your legs aren't strong enough...bottom line.

    I don't care who you are, but apples to apples, for the same amount of effort, you're going to go faster on a skinny-tired mountain bike than you will on a fattie, especially on flat trails.
    Otoh, they do climb better- traction will do that and you can bomb dh sections where you might have to pick your lines more carefully with an xc hard tail, but I stand by my assertion that fat bikes aren't built for speed. They're the monster trucks of mountain bikes.
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  29. #29
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    Do Fat Bikes shred single track?

    I don't really care who you are either :-). But in the rooty rocky world I live in, my fatbike pedals faster down the trail than my hardtail 29er. Period. On carriage roads and rail trails, sure the 29er is faster, and so would be a cross bike. I just did a 100 mile race on the fatbike, and I have no doubt that I would have gone faster on one of my other bikes. Lots of double track and rail trail...but the OP is asking about single track, and where I live that usually means a little tech involved, not buffed out hero dirt like in some lucky lands. It is NOT my race bike. Use the right tool for the job. But I still say that it IS fast, it may not be the fastEST...but hey, neither am I.

  30. #30
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    Do Fat Bikes shred single track?

    I would just say that if you are in the front of the group on a ride now, you'll be in the front on the fatty too. If you're in the back, you'll be there on the fatty too. How often during a normal ride are you riding as fast as you physically can?Well, you aren't, usually the trail checks you off of that..so it really won't make a difference.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I don't care who you are, but apples to apples, for the same amount of effort, you're going to go faster on a skinny-tired mountain bike than you will on a fattie, especially on flat trails.
    On my local trails that's certainly true. We don't have sand or other soft terrain which would favour a fatbike on the trails plus they are very rough which makes suspension a significant benefit.

    When I am in Baja my Pugsley's ability to go anywhere is a definite advantage and I can simply ride in spots where normal MTBs come to a grinding halt.
    Safe riding,

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  32. #32
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    I'm a big believer in science and all, and the discussions of physics and tire sizes and rolling resistance are interesting, but the only measurement that really matters is how fast YOU can go on the trails.

    If a fatbike inspires more confidence, then you can go faster on it than a skinny bike. If having fun makes you go faster, you might ride faster on your fatbike. As for more tangible things, the traction factor is real. Also, I've noticed when riding the fatty at the edge of control, it seems to recover better when I push it too far. I find I have far fewer episodes of getting slammed to the ground and wondering WTF just happened.

  33. #33
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    My experience is skinny may be faster in bursts, but over an extended period fat covers more ground.

    But why get a fat bike if speed etc is your aim? There's far more specialist tools available.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  34. #34
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    Last sunday i took my fat bike on a TT (tourtocht) i don't know the word in Englisch...
    courses like the Stany Smol Challenge ( Stany Smol )

    I normally ride these courses on a Specialized Camber 29'er. But this weekend i drove
    the Mukluk down in Stavelot (Belgium Ardennes). And i have to tell you. It was a blast!
    So much traction biking up the hill and in corners going down.
    Yes you have to work, thats true. The darn thing weighs a ton going up the hill but when it goes up for like 25% in loose gravel. hehe. It keeps going.
    Also ik thought i had a 22 granny gear. (i just saw when cleaning it is a 24.)
    I also thought i had a 36 in the back... (just saw it is a 34).
    So i had made a trip of 35 km. and 1033 Altitude + meters on a fatty. And i was a
    bit proud of myself that it went with ease and energy to spare.

    Now the fun part, going down on moist gras. A rider before me drove into a field. But i could maintain my cornering speed very easy. Even went a bit faster. The guy behind me was thinking that he could go just as fast... He saw some bushes from up close
    But what i noticed is that you have to look much more at the trails. hitting some big as rocks at fast speed with my Camber is no problem. The things eats it.
    Doing that with a Fatbike.... bye bye rim or hello snakebite.

    For me its going back in time when i first started biking(20 years ago).
    Big fun, big smiles, big tires. Working hard but feeling good.

    So does i shred trails? Yes, but you have to be more focussed on what lays on the tracks.

  35. #35
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    I love my Fatback on singletrack.

    Went from a hardtail 26er to riding my fatbike year round, I won't go back. I think on my local trails, I'm a hair slower overall, but I find that i don't need to be quite as careful picking my lines over rocks and roots.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9576035881/" title="G0071180-001 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7399/9576035881_8a59ac54b0_z.jpg" width="483" height="640" alt="G0071180-001"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9090989876/" title="GOPR0044 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7286/9090989876_2a2ea7686f_z.jpg" width="640" height="353" alt="GOPR0044"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9576038611/" title="G0041158 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3766/9576038611_10bcd00e3b_z.jpg" width="640" height="353" alt="G0041158"></a>
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Do Fat Bikes shred single track?-g0071180-001.jpg  

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP View Post
    I'm a big believer in science and all, and the discussions of physics and tire sizes and rolling resistance are interesting, but the only measurement that really matters is how fast YOU can go on the trails.
    I can safely say that I ride for a much different reason than you do. That aside, my fat bike "shreds" just as well as I need it to.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  37. #37
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    The answer is yes

    At the end of June I fractured my ankle in a crash. I had too much time on line which i used to find and buy one of the few remaining Salsa Beargrease in the UK. Against my wifes better judgement I took the Beargrease home and rode it, a mere 3 weeks after the fracture.

    Its a long time since I had that much fun on a bike. Even riding with a fractured ankle it was awesome. In fact, it feels good just looking at it and its sheer fatness makes me happy.

    But is it as fast as my other bikes?

    I also have a garmin, so I have ride data

    I live in the UK at the bottom of a hill covered in woodland and have a whole bunch of routes I have worked out in the woods.

    One of my rides is a 10.5 mile ride with just over 1000ft of elevation gained. It is a corker of a ride, especially as the offroad starts and finishes half a mile from my front door. The ride includes lots of steep and loose and slippery uphill, some steep fireroad uphill, lots of really tight natural singletrack, a couple of big downhills, down a flight of steps, and about a mile of tarmac plus the half mile to and from the trail.

    My best time on my Beargrease is 1 hour 14 min
    My best time on my XTR equipped Titus X-Carbon is 1 hr 17 min
    My best time on my XT equipped Pivot 5.7 Carbon is 1 hr 19 min

    For sure, each of the bikes is is better than the others for different bits of the trail and maybe I tried harder on the beargrease because I love it so much.

    Yes, the Pivot wipes the floor with the other bikes on the downhills. But the beargrease just won't let go round the corners and it speeds through the singletrack with such precision it makes the Pivot feel like a chopper. The Beargrease bounces over the trail obstacles with such joy that I wonder what is the point of 100mm of travel the Titus gives me.

    So I'd say across a whole ride on my local terrain, a Fatbike is equal to any other bike. Mostly because of the way it takes the Singletrack.

    Start heading for the mountains, with big drops and big rocks maybe it will be a different story

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    Fat is the only way to ride full rigid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    I can safely say that I ride for a much different reason than you do. That aside, my fat bike "shreds" just as well as I need it to.
    Not sure how you are able to infer my "reason" for riding from what I said. My comment was not meant to imply that I am a shredder who only cares about going fast. It was in the context of the ongoing discussion of whether fatbikes are capable of going as fast or faster than regular MTBs. I am old, and only shred when I am am angry. Or happy. Or showing off. Or when being chased by bees.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by f00g View Post
    Went from a hardtail 26er to riding my fatbike year round, I won't go back. I think on my local trails, I'm a hair slower overall, but I find that i don't need to be quite as careful picking my lines over rocks and roots.
    Gunna ride there tomorrow! But not on my fatbike, the fatbike feels like you are dragging a monster-truck tire behind you on a rope. As long as it's smooth (like kincaid) the fatbike can be pretty fast on the downhills. As soon as it gets bumpy though it slows you way down.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by f00g View Post
    Went from a hardtail 26er to riding my fatbike year round, I won't go back. I think on my local trails, I'm a hair slower overall, but I find that i don't need to be quite as careful picking my lines over rocks and roots.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9576035881/" title="G0071180-001 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7399/9576035881_8a59ac54b0_z.jpg" width="483" height="640" alt="G0071180-001"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9090989876/" title="GOPR0044 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7286/9090989876_2a2ea7686f_z.jpg" width="640" height="353" alt="GOPR0044"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/9527634@N04/9576038611/" title="G0041158 by F00G, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3766/9576038611_10bcd00e3b_z.jpg" width="640" height="353" alt="G0041158"></a>
    Where is this? I'm jealous. I had one run this week where I swear it was difficult to find room for 1 pedal revolution without slamming a sharp rock over over-sized root. Your trail looks idyllic to me. Does anyone regularly take their fatbike on trails comparable to Vancouver's North Shore?

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    A lot will depend on whether you can get some front suspension into the mix, shredwise. It will rip respectably rigid, but some squish up front will really take it up a few notches on most downhill single track. Fun either way, but if you want to duke it out for KOMs some front squish can get you there...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooSteep View Post
    Where is this? I'm jealous. I had one run this week where I swear it was difficult to find room for 1 pedal revolution without slamming a sharp rock over over-sized root. Your trail looks idyllic to me. Does anyone regularly take their fatbike on trails comparable to Vancouver's North Shore?
    Kincaid Park in Anchorage. It's got some great trails and we're currently building a bunch more in the same area. Nice smooth flow trails and some good doubles/tabletops/features to keep it interesting. One of the places where you can really jump a fatbike because everything is so smooth for the most part. A few roots, but not many. Some other stuff around the city has more roots, but we got some pretty amazing trail options nearby. If we get out an hour or two southwest we got some awesome epic trails out on the peninsula, no lack of great dirt.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    I can easily see a fat bike being faster on certain courses than other bikes. Any course where you spend more time braking, and turning on fairly smooth surfaces than you do pedaling all out on hardpack, or flying through rough stuff on a FS bike. Even if you spend as much or more time going flat out, the seconds you gain in the turns, and tough climbs can easily make up for a slight deficit on the straight sections from the extra rolling resistance and weight. Kind of like a Mazda MX-5 beating a Mustang GT around a race track, when the Mustang has twice the acceleration potential. When you can take certain slower sections faster, less acceleration is needed to getup to speed on the faster sections.

    If you take the Fat tires to the next level with a Full suspension fat bike even more possibilities open for shredding singletrack faster than a skinny mountain bike. Then, anywhere your speed is limited by anything other than your leg power, the FS fat bike will be faster.

    Or, another comparison would be adding wings to a race car. They definitely slow you down by adding drag, but lap times improve from the additional traction going through turns, and accelerating and braking, which covers all except the time that the car is at top speed, or acceleration is limited by horsepower, rather than traction.

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    Um, I love riding my fatbike, it's fun, but you've got to be kidding me. The heavy tires and rims drag the bike towards the outside of turns at speed, and the faster you go the greater this becomes. If you're REALLY hauling, you just can't turn like a bike with lighter wheels, you'll simply get dragged right off the trail on the opposite side. And getting back up to speed after any such event/turn? lol...Again, I like riding my fatbike, even in the summer on trails, but people are making claims that are just ridiculous.

    This would be like a miata with 55lb 20" iron wheels and ridiculous tires. Yes, it would have gobs of traction, bit it would be slow as heck.

    Same trail area as above:

    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    It's all give and take, I don't own a FS bike so I'm not qualified to make a comparison, I love riding my fatbike. I realized how much slower I am on the fatbike earlier this month coming down from Devils pass I was following a Soggy Bottom racer and could keep up and had to brake on the downs but as soon as we went back up it was too much for me to keep up. Bike weight/gearing has a lot to do with that.
    "but you are a jerk, google it!" anonymous negative feedback 09-18-2012 09:07 AM Keep is positive folks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    No. They shred single track and take drops like a rigid fat tire mountain bike.

    If you would have fun riding a rigid skinny MTB on your trails you'll have fun riding a fatbike on your trails.

    You'll also be able to explore places your skinny MTB would struggle with and ride in the winter if you get snow in your neck of the woods.

    Ideally get a test ride on your local trails so you can see for yourself what is what.
    Vikb is right on the money.
    I ride singletrack almost every day probably 50/50 split fat Pugsley and FS 29er. The fat bike is a rigid bike so the faster you go over bumps the harder it is on the body because the tires do not absorb the bumps the way FS does. Fat is harder to push forward too. Having said that I still ride the fatty pretty hard and have fun doing so.

    If you ride slower you realize how much fun Fat can be. The increased stability, float, and Kung fu grip mean you can have fun riding in places and conditions that would not be as fun on skinny tires even if FS.

    Fat has expanded my riding world and I love it.

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    I occasionally overshoot tight corners and end up ploughing through the undergrowth instead. But on a fatbike this is fine!

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    Quote Originally Posted by HT5rider View Post
    I occasionally overshoot tight corners and end up ploughing through the undergrowth instead. But on a fatbike this is fine!
    With a fatbike, the whole world is your trail.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

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    Again, so much depends on the build. I ride a spesh epic with some bigger tires and a dropper post, and trade downhill times with my 907/marge lite wheel set/lefty fork bike. I have a little downhill segment KOM on the fatbike, and am generally well in the top 10. The more gravity oriented the better for the fattie. Tight turns are just fine. I don't experience the wild corner overshoot much but the bike likes a pretty active riding style for sure.

    Maybe the question should be, can you put together a fatbike that will rip single track? Yes. Will you rip it on a bone-stock pugs, maybe not so much, though it will still probably be really fun trying.

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