Results 1 to 79 of 79

Thread: DIY Pogies

  1. #1
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598

    DIY Pogies

    So, I was about to get the Cabelas Pogies for $20, but they looked so cheap, I figured I could do better myself. I have done a lot of sewing projects, so that is no problem.
    I live in Colorado, so it won't be THAT cold.

    Some design questions:

    for closure around the bars, do I just have a big open hole that wraps tight with velcro?
    does this seal well enough around the cables?

    Will coated dyneema gridstop be too unbreathable - should I get an uncoated cordura, or even goretex?

    Would two layers of 200 wt fleece be about right?

    How is the wrist entry done - does it close tight, or just stay open a bit?

    What can I use for stiffener?

    Any Must Have features? I plan on having a handwarmer pocket, at least.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,601
    most commercially available pogies just have one big opening at the bar that cinches with velcro. on my homemades i have a flap of material on the top part that folds down between the cables and bar to seal it off. i wouldn't worry about breathability. worry about insulation. what you need will depend on the length and intensity of your rides and the temps. i think two layers of fleece will be more than enough, and personally, i like a layer of lightweight ripstop on the inside so that my hands slide in and out easily. the best material i've found for a stiffener is aluminum screening. cut it to shape and duck tape the edges. insert it between the outer layer and the first insulation layer. duck taping the edges is very important with it. be thorough.

    EDIT: oh, and wrist entry open. if it's tight you wont be able to get your second hand in it.

    don't forget to add bar end loops for holding them upright. and, try to not make them ginormously oversized like i tend to do....

  3. #3
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    can I make mine work with bar ends, or should I just take them off for winter? If they are too big they will be less thermally efficient.

    How easy are they (generally) to take off and put back on?
    Some of my winter rides will be relatively warm and sunny during the day on the uphill, then when the sun goes down and its time to come back downhill, it gets REALLY cold.
    Would it be practical to just stow them in the pack until needed?

    Thanks for the informative response!

  4. #4
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,601
    bar ends are very good to have in the winter. they help keep the pogies where the should be(via the afroementioned loop) and i find the increased hand positions even more benneficial in the winter. don't make them snug at all. trust me, you wont have to worry about thermal efficiency. my first pair i made out of plastic grocery bags an old t-shirt and duck tape. they were very warm down to about 20 degrees while they were still intact. block the wind, make a pocket to trap the warm air and your internal engine will take care of the rest.

  5. #5
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,601
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    bar ends are very good to have in the winter. they help keep the pogies where the should be(via the afroementioned loop) and i find the increased hand positions even more benneficial in the winter. don't make them snug at all. trust me, you wont have to worry about thermal efficiency. my first pair i made out of plastic grocery bags an old t-shirt and duck tape. they were very warm down to about 20 degrees while they were still intact. block the wind, make a pocket to trap the warm air and your internal engine will take care of the rest.

    i really should make a habbit of reading an entire post before responding...

    they're fairly easy to take on and off, but better would be to make them so that they could be rolled down.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,672
    I made mine out of Reflectix, velco, and tape. Works pretty well actually. I wish they had H-bar compatible pogies without getting super expensive custom ones.

  7. #7
    Caveman
    Reputation: Bearbait's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,002
    insulate your bars and grips too, does wonders - cover anything metal with something not.

  8. #8
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,363
    Here are the ones I make.

    I use a synthetic batt insulation which is pre-quilted to a light nylon tafetta. A little insulation goes a long way. Get the THIN stuff like for a light jacket, not sleeping bag material. The nylon is nice and slippery for getting your arms in and out and snow does not stick to it like fleece. The quilted insulation also gives the pogies a nice structure so they hold their shape for years of use without getting all floppy. The dart I sew in also gives them a decent box shape that stiffens them and keeps the fabric from pressing on your hands.

    For the shell I use 2-layer Ultrex (like GoreTex but cheaper). Really cuts the wind, waterproof, and holds up very well except in crashes on rock/pavement.

    I make the top longer than the bottom so that the hole is roughly perpendicular to the ground when you insert your hands. this helps keep snow out, and when the bike is parked the top is a "roof" to also help keep crap out.

    I will attach some (bad) pictures. if you see quilting, the pogies are turned inside out. The squares on the rotary cutter mat at 1" for scale reference. It should make it pretty easy to copy the shape. The left and right sides are not identical, but rather mirror images, because of the overhanging tops. Make a set out of newspaper the first time so you get the idea, and then use them for a pattern.





    Top:



    Bottom:







    Top inside out (note the dart in upper right):



    Bottom inside out:



    Arm hole:



    Last edited by tscheezy; 10-15-2009 at 05:12 PM.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  9. #9
    Ride = Life
    Reputation: racerxti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    193
    Nice pogies tscheezy. Without fleece, what kind of gloves do you wear depending on temperature outside? I'm a pogie noob, never tried them, but gotta be better then gloves alone.

    Also what keeps the wind/ rain / snow from exploiting the seams?

    I need pogies for between 0 - 32 deg F. I'm interested in custom, so I can build something that goes around my commuter bike's Novara Trekking bar, but also make one for my snow bike's riser bar.

    Time to bribe the wife to take on this sewing project...
    Last edited by racerxti; 10-15-2009 at 02:42 PM.
    "Riding is about rhythm and flow. It's the wind in your face and the challenge of hammering up a long hill…" - Gary Klein

  10. #10
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,601
    If you have to deal with rain:

    1 - go with waterproof outer shell

    2 - wool insulation will be a little heavier, but better IMO

    3 - use seam sealer. you can get several different types at any craft/sewing/outdoors store.

    4 - consider adding a drain hole at the lowest point.

  11. #11
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,363
    Without fleece, what kind of gloves do you wear depending on temperature outside?
    I commute all winter without gloves using these. That keeps me comfy for around town jaunts down to about 10 F (-12 C). We rarely get down below 10 F here. If so, a medium weight pair of fleece gloves would be enough under the pogies. They really work very well.

    I'm a pogie noob, never tried them, but gotta be better then gloves alone
    Amazingly so. As I said, I commute all winter here in coastal Alaska with no gloves, just pogies. Riding offroad with them I will often add a light pair of gloves under the pogies, but my hands often end up sweating.

    Also what keeps the wind/ rain / snow from exploiting the seams?
    The whole top and whole bottom are solid pieces. There are the seams on the sides, and you could seam seal those. Generally if it's raining, it's not that cold out. If it's cold, liquid water is not an issue. No snow is going to wiggle through a seam. I ride in the rain a lot and have not felt the need to seal the seams, personally. They will get damp after a period of riding in solid rain, but then every thing else is going to end up we too.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  12. #12
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    I don't plan on dealing with rain or much moisture. Living in CO, that isn't a common problem in the winter.

    Thanks for all the info! Now I just need to source some insulation and some time.
    My hands should be much happier this winter.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Polk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    646
    The biggest advantage, in my opinion, is the wind protection. I have made a couple sets out of vinyl. One had no insulation, and one had a layer only on the top/forward surface. There was not much difference in hand comfort between the two; so I think simply creating a pocket of still air around my hands kept them warm. When riding on road section, where my riding speed was faster, there would be enough air circulation to cool my hands off, but as soon as I slow to trail speeds my hands would warm up. Mind you, this was all with summer-type long finger gloves while riding in temperatures as low as mid-teens.

    An addition I used in my design was a plastic stay running lengthwise along the back/top panel to keep them from collapsing down, and I also used a piece of plastic threaded through the wrist hem to keep it open. I used pieces of vinyl siding for a house (gotta be creative with your resources!), but you could also use a plastic milk jug or laundry detergent bottle, or...

  14. #14
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,363
    Quote Originally Posted by Polk
    I have made a couple sets out of vinyl.

    ...you could also use a plastic milk jug or laundry detergent bottle, or...
    Soooo ghetto.

    If the back (where your arm enters) is wide open, then yes, they only offer wind protection. If the back is even somewhat close fitting and reduces the number of air exchanges, however, the amount of insulation does make a significant difference. I made a set from slightly thicker insulation (about twice the loft of my usual sets). This made them feel snug enough against my sleeves that I didn't like the the fit as much, and MAN did they make my hands hot. I put them on my wife's bike and she loves the extra warmth and narrower proportions.

    Real hardcore winter pogies will have a knitted ribbed cuff or similar at the entrance to really seal the arm hole. They are also sometimes big enough to double as a bivy.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    22
    tscheezy, would you please sell me a pair of your pogies? thumbsup:






    (I am all thumbs when it comes to sewing)
    Last edited by starkm32; 11-14-2009 at 10:35 AM.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    576
    Quote Originally Posted by starkm32
    tscheezy, would you please sell me a pair of your pogies? thumbsup:
    If you'd make a small series, count me in for a pair !

    Probably cheaper then getting a sewing machine, the medical bill from having my fingers un-stitched etc

  17. #17
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    Thanks for the tips. Here they are on their maiden voyage.


  18. #18
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,363
    Wow, looks like you did an amazing job. Want to provide some construction and material details to benefit other DIYers?
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  19. #19
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    Shell: dyneema/spectra gridstop
    Liner: Momentum leftover from my primaloft pants project (from www.thru-hiker.com)
    Insulation: 2 layers of standard fleece
    Stiffener: Pieces of a Sysco Classic Syrup jug, 3 layers thick, 2 inches or so wide, sewn together. About the length of the arm section. Duct taped up real good.

    Next time I would just use synthetic insulation, as I ended up doing all those steps anyway. And a gore-tex shell.

    It has a torpedo shaped insert along the outside curve and a potato shaped insert along the inside curve for some 3D. Next time I would have a 2in or wider piece go all the way around the whole thing. This would necessitate modifying the whole pattern.
    The entry hole is a good diameter for me. With only a few layers on, it has some ventilation, but when the puffy jacket comes out it seals right up. I might add a fleece collar around the entry to make it a bit smaller.

    I made up a pattern in CAD (Cardboard Aided Design) then made one all the way through. The downshift lever (sram trigger) was hard to use, so I seam ripped it open and added in the potato shaped insert on the inside curve.

    They were warmer without gloves than with (damp) liner gloves. My hands never got cold, but never got warm either.

    There are full bar ends in there. They help stabilize the pogies, but are almost useless as bar ends with this setup. I have two velcro straps, one at the base of the bar end, one at the elbow. The elbow strap held the pogies too horizontal, so I am not using them. I am considering angling my bar ends down a few degrees to get more space below the brake levers.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    340
    When I look at these pictures, I can't help thinking that I could modify some oven mitts to do the job somehow!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    22
    Sounds like you are on to something.

    Long bubble wrap inside should provide some insulation from wind, and cold.

    Keep us posted. (The darted angle could prove to be a bear.)

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: damnitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,290

    hoodies

    Ancient Fairbanks, AK dirtbag technique...making a ghetto set from a couple of hoods taken from two child's winter coats (salvation army, good will, etc are great sources).
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    22
    Yowzah!

    I just made some ghetto pogies!

    First, wrapt some thin, curved styrofoam (for shape). Duct taped.

    Then pulled over some long circular bubblewrap (from a loo-ong bubblewrap envelope) over the styrofoam. Duct taped, and folded over the taped section.

    Then, perhaps, a pair of camo sleeves over the bubble wrap (to minimize the ghetto effect). Heh.

    This, on my winter beater.

    With a pair of studded tires, and (needless?) Pearl Azumi lobster gloves, I am reddy teddy. Toasty.

    Yowzah!

  24. #24
    Light freak
    Reputation: scar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,810

    Thanks for the getting me started

    Started with these






    Cut down to this




    Ended up with this




  25. #25
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,601
    Damn, that puts my first ghetto pogie attempt to shame! nice work!

  26. #26
    Self-defeatist
    Reputation: CLONG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    965
    Here's a recent sewing project, one of my first. As usual there were a few times i wanted to throw the whole project in the garbage. Things didn't turn out exactly as I had expected, but everything works, and that's something. I'd still like to relocate the handlebar loops further forward. Also I'd like to add some bar ends to open things up.

    I used one of my SO's old down winter coats, cut in half. I cut the sleeves, rolled them and added a small piece of hook-and-loop to close the gap between the bar and the cables.

    Cut off the excess.


    To try to control the stray down I sewed the seam first then cut off the collar over a garbage bag.


    Half done. Cat shown for scale.


    "Finished." Tho I later added handlebar loops and some darts to the front to bring the fabric closer to my hands.


    Here's a blurry picture of them on the bike along with my embarrassingly lumpy gas tank. Now bring on the SNOW!
    I'm covered in beer.

  27. #27
    jbn
    jbn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    29
    Some pretty amazing stuff here. One thing I would add is make sure you can operate your controls from the outside. Even on the coldest days (-0 F) my hands are outside the covers probably 75% of the time.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    51
    rohloff compatible pogies!


    rohloff pogies by timlupfer, on Flickr

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johnclimber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    456
    Would motor bike ones work the same?
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Oxford-motor...f=pd_cp_auto_1

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,598
    I think we see more ingenuity and innovation on the fatbike forum than all the other forums combined
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    22
    Here are my DIY pogies made completly out of a kids down winter jacket.
    Took a couple of hours. I left the sleeves alone, then have a double cuff and should seal up around the bars nicely. I used the elastic and tighter do hicky to make nice bar loops.
    They look like they will work well but I'm still waiting for my MukLuk...

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1009293453

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1009293453

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1009293453

  32. #32
    aka bOb
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    8,008
    What would you guys recommend for DIY Pogies Ultrex or Cordura for the shell?
    Thanks...

  33. #33
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,363
    Ultrex is nice, but won't withstand many encounters with branches or crashes on ice. If you are only going to ride in snow, it may hold up well enough. The Cordura will be more durable though make sure you get some really good coated stuff for waterproofing.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: damnitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,290
    The answer is yes. Use Ultrex for the shell and Cordura as edging and strategically placed wear strips...though I've seen a really nice coating on a really high denier cordura a while back...it was basically a heavy duty Ultrex.
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,654
    For those looking to add body to your DIY pogies you may be interested in plastic needle pointing canvas. Available at sewing and craft/hobbie stores. Basically a rigid plastic screen-like material. I think that it may be available in various thickness and hole sizes which would alter its flexibility for pogie building.

    (just noted that my grandmother needle pointed many of our Christmas ornaments with it)

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    646
    Any Jones Loop bar pogies out there? Wood Dog Wood Designs H Bar Pogies Work?

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    343
    I use the cabela's on a loop bar and they work. They are not ideal as they are 90° and the sweep of the bar can make they harder than it should be to get in and out... have looked at attaching them to the bar ends to maintain the angle correctly but it isn't so important that I have gotten around to it...yet.



    g

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    24
    Finished up some holiday gift poggies. They came out pretty well, but I probably would have given up without the help from you all, Thanks! Now Ill have to make a set for myself...

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    646
    Any pics

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    22
    PIXS x 2, please.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tartosuc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    672
    Bringing back that old thread
    I made my own pogies with a 10$ wetsuit from the thrift store.
    Neoprene only, should be enough for my needs.
    Verlcro squeeze atbthe cables keeping them in place.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DIY Pogies-image.jpg  

    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

  42. #42
    All fat, all the time.
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    7,276
    Sweet how do you get the bike to stay upside down?


    I am impressed by all these DIY pogies. I just ordered a set of moose mitts....I cannot sew.

  43. #43
    Dinner for wolves
    Reputation: buddhak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,560
    Canfield FTW! Great energy in this thread, y'all.
    Responds to gravity

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    286
    I used a kids jacket. I did the shakedown ride yesterday (non-fatbike alert)
    http://forums.mtbr.com/attachment.ph...1&d=1353343516
    My pogies are pink with teletubbies.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DIY Pogies-12-1.jpeg  


  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    2
    I'm about to start sewing some pogies, but am having second thoughts about the insulation. Would a polartec fleece (2 layers) sandwiched between the outer layer of cordura and inner layer or ultrex be enough to be toasty down to -30 F? Or should I place another order at Seattle Fabrics for some of the primaloft insulation or the quilted insulation with a smooth nylon finish? Any experience with cold temps by anyone?

    A day or 2 of riding at temps down to the negative 30's is what they'll be primarily used for.

    Thanks!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    286
    I have ridden extensively in -30 to -40 and for me, my hands have been warm with a layer of nylon with 300 weight windstopper fleece and a wraparound of blue camping mattress foam. (not the pogies shown above).
    You can see the custom ones here: Riding back to the car | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
    They are overkill for riding in the city, but I can fit snacks in them and they work as booties in a pinch as well as having a removable piece of camping mattress that I can use on my hip and shoulder in case my real mattress fails.
    Note that my hands are not my weak point for coping with the cold I have more problems keeping my toes warm.
    Doug

  47. #47
    Laramie, Wyoming
    Reputation: alphazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,941
    Some great work on here. I am wondering how much time guys are spending making these poggies. I'd bet some of the projects on here took an entire day. Let's see, 8 hours at $15-25/hour, yep, I'm glad I just bought a nice pair of Dogwoods.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by alphazz View Post
    Some great work on here. I am wondering how much time guys are spending making these poggies. I'd bet some of the projects on here took an entire day. Let's see, 8 hours at $15-25/hour, yep, I'm glad I just bought a nice pair of Dogwoods.
    The ones from kid's jackets take 15-30 minutes.
    My expedition ones were built in 1999 when there weren't so many options for commercial ones, and were built to fit a wide variety of criteria. They took nearly 4 hours to build, but I could make a new set in less than half that.
    Like many things, there is always a time/money vs. needs tradeoff. I have seen a pair of Dogwood pogies and they look well designed and well made.

  49. #49
    Lord Thunderbottom
    Reputation: TitanofChaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    905
    Made my first attempt at DIY pogies, they work pretty well but I've got some minor tweaking to do, they could be a fuzz longer and a fuzz narrower in the arm openings

    I used 2 layers of fleece and a layer of flannel for the outside, I was going to use something more water resistant but when I saw the bicycle print I lost my mind

    shown on on-one mary bars
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DIY Pogies-2012-12-01-20.50.28.jpg  


  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kyttyra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    188
    My DIY mitts. Made from some felt-ish fabric, windstopper fabric and reflective strips. They still need some fine-tuning, but as it is, I'm childlishly pleased with them. Of course I could have bought a pair (the prices start from 13,90 euros or something) but I wanted to make my own



    EDIT glued some faux fur to cuffs for keeping the warmth in better:

    Last edited by kyttyra; 07-08-2013 at 10:34 PM.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,316
    Nice work kyttyra! Those look really nice, and I like how you've sealed them around the brake reservoir. Impressive!
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velobike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    6,598
    I was going to say pretty cool, but should I say warm
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kyttyra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    188
    Thanks for compliments BTW, the mitts look like this from inside:



    Note the small loop on the left - it goes around the end of handlebar and secures the mitt that it does not move around. I'll replace them with elastic bands when I have the time.
    Last edited by kyttyra; 12-15-2012 at 03:49 PM.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    60
    all your barmitts look great! well, here's my non-pro sewing un-skilled self has made.... out of rice bags that I had laying around in the house.....











    I do have one that my in-laws got me for my birthday, but I needed an extra one on mild days. this one serves mostly as a wind breaker/ deflector when it is cold out.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: druidh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    673
    * REWIND *

    Yoghurt pot mudguard?

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    * REWIND *

    Yoghurt pot mudguard?
    yes sir! i am a believer of repurposing/ recycling materials. I find satisfaction in making my own things or repurposing materials ( when you are broke, gotta do things that are extremely cheap or free )

  57. #57
    Caveman
    Reputation: Bearbait's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,002
    kinda reminds me of the derilict campaign from zoolander. nice.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    113
    So after reading this thread among others, inspired by all the DIYs, I've decided to make my own pogies.

    Found RockyWoods and chose a number of fabrics. I'd like to get some feedback from those of you who own a pair (of pogies...), bought or DIY:ed.

    Outer shell: 1000D Coated Cordura
    Insulation: 150 Thinsulate Ultra
    Inner shell: 30D Double Silicone Coated Ripstop Nylon (to get the sleeping bag feeling)
    2'' Nylon webbing (for the "joints", sorry for the wording: English is not my mother tongue and sewing is not my major...)

    Living in Sweden, really cold hands and feet. Basically impossible for me to bike between october and april

    So, what's your opinion? Poor/good material choice? Which sewing thread would you recommend? Any use for seam sealers or seam tape?

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    113
    Nobody? I know it might be quite early to ask now, but I do need the time until winter to make mistakes...

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kyttyra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    188
    I made my pogies from cheap windstopper, cheap felt-ish material and faux fur (see previous page of this thread). They are indeed very varm, but should I make a new, improved pair, I would add a liner as the inner of my pogies feels a little rough to bare hands.

    The "felt" was a good choice, as it's stiff and thus the pogies keep their shape quite well. This is good IMO as I have tried some pogies that sag on the handlebars, and although the weight is not big, they begin to feel uncomfortable for arms/wrists after a while for some reason.

    A real felt inner would probably be a winner - or overkill

    Can't say anything about real technical materials though as I went with a shoelace budget

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    113
    Thanksfor the input kyttyra. I'm indeed a little worried about the stiffness (or lack thereof) of the pogies. I guess cordura should be stiff enough, especially with some kind of "dart" as in the ones made by tscheezy (DIY Pogies).

    And you confirm the need for inner liner. The 30D Ripstop might be a little overkill though, looking at what sleeping bags are made of... This one might be more suitable:
    Downproof Ripstop Nylon - White.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: damnitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,290
    My humble opinion is that you will be able to make yourself a more than adequate pair of pogies. Personally, I would use a different shell material...nothing wrong with cordura, but I think a WPB gore-type fabric would be a better choice, perhaps using the cordura to add abrasion patches to areas more susceptible to wear. The coated ripstop is the ticket for a liner as the coating should reduce the amount of sweat that gets into the insulation. I also think you would be going down the right path to use some sort of seam sealer, liquid or tape...not sure what the intent of the webbing is though...if it is just to "hide" the exterior of the seams, I would opt for a reflective grosgrain ribbon instead.

    -disclaimer-just my $0.02
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    113
    Thanks damnitman.

    I've considered the Gore stuff, but in the end decided against it. Main reason is that my Gore-Tex clothes don't seem to hold there waterproofness and need to be re-treated regularly. For that reason, I'm discarding the "breathable" and prioritizing the waterproofness instead.

    As for the webbing, I don't really know if it's the correct piece of material I need, but what I intend to use it to, is to "finish off" the seams as it's done here (the black ribbon on the edges): Berlin Messenger Bag | Berlin Bag | Chrome Industries

    Edit: Just checked grosgrain ribbon and it looks like it's exactly what I'm looking for instead for that webbing stuff!

    The seam sealant might be overkill, I need to look a little bit more into that.

    Planning to use bonded nylon 69 thread and an 18 needle which hopefully will fit on my stepmother's machine...

    Some kind of reflective tape will be sewn on as well, have not taken time to dig in the different kinds yet

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23
    elmaco,

    If waterproofness is your number one priority, you'll have to seam seal the pogies. Otherwise the seams are not watertight; how could they be with all the needle holes? Also, reconsider using WPB fabric like Gore Tex because the condensation trapped from nonbreathable fabric will make your hands wet anyway. It's the DWR coating that needs to be reapplied, but the layer that provides the waterproofing lasts far longer.

    I haven't made a pair of pogies yet, but my plan is 200 weight fleece inner with a WPB shell.

    Anyway, my thoughts. Best of luck on your project, and please post pictures when you're done!
    1989 Bridgestone mb-3
    2013 Salsa El Mariachi 2
    Soma Smoothie

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tartosuc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    672
    back on an old thread, for those of you that have used stiffener material, where do you place it?
    expensive cars are a waste of money. Expensive bikes...not so much!

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    14

    Far from a full DIY but...

    Far from a full DIY pogies but i bought cheap Amazon ATV Logic mitts and modified them for my Rocky Mountain Blizzard. I use a On-One Mary bar and they still work great.

    1- I took 1.5 inch webbing and sewed velcro onto it and punch a hole than insert them into my handlebar plug. I insert the plug into my handle bar.
    DIY Pogies-pogies4.jpg
    2- I sewed 2 strips of velcro into each pogies along the center seem. I make the inside velcro longer then needed to leave me some room for fore and aft adjustment.
    DIY Pogies-pogies3.jpg
    3- I inserteded the pogies onto my handlebar and adjusted velcro to my taste. They now stay where they need to.

    They work great and if i want something warmer, i can use them as a pattern and use better material.
    DIY Pogies-pogies1.jpgDIY Pogies-pogies2.jpg

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation: solarplex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1,086

    DIY Pogies

    I know this is diy hand muffs, but check out skinz protective gear for more handguard style ones. The sled ones are smaller, nicer, cheaper.


    #canadastrong
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    117
    Lovely stuff ... I wish I could sow I'd love to have some primaloft pogies. Nothing beats down for warmth/weight ratio and primaloft is very similar (although slightly more heavy) I hear. Also other than down still works when wet and as a plus, doesn't involve animal cruelty.

    The only one on the market I know are the 45NRTH ones. I don't like them because of the criticism to the inside pocket, which gets in the way often ... and because everything from 45NRTH is priced in the hype/hip level of things.

  69. #69
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,770
    Here are mine:


    DIY pogies by Nate, on Flickr


    DIY pogies by Nate, on Flickr

    Shell: 1000D Cordura
    Liner: Momentum 90 DWR nylon scraps leftover from a sleeping bag project
    Fill: Thinsulate 150

    Here's my process/instructions.

    DIY Mountain Bike Pogies | The GPS Geek

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watermonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    935
    I used screw in snaps, General® Canvas Screw-Snap Refill (1268) - Grommets & Grommet Tools - Ace Hardware, one the ends of my pogies to keep them in place. The "male" screw in end goes into the plastic end cap of my ODI grips, and the "female" button head rivets onto the pogie. They snap on, stay in place, but pull free easily in an emergency exit or to fold them over and out of the way when the temps heat up. It feels cleaner on the inside than with the setups with a strap, bungee or velcro around the bar end. I've used these on the neoprene Bar Mits as well as the ATV logic pogies.
    Name:  snap kit.jpg
Views: 691
Size:  72.7 KB
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    117
    Argh, you evil people and your sowing skills. Did anyone consider using Primaloft?

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,023
    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    I used screw in snaps, General® Canvas Screw-Snap Refill (1268) - Grommets & Grommet Tools - Ace Hardware, one the ends of my pogies to keep them in place. The "male" screw in end goes into the plastic end cap of my ODI grips, and the "female" button head rivets onto the pogie. They snap on, stay in place, but pull free easily in an emergency exit or to fold them over and out of the way when the temps heat up. It feels cleaner on the inside than with the setups with a strap, bungee or velcro around the bar end. I've used these on the neoprene Bar Mits as well as the ATV logic pogies.
    Name:  snap kit.jpg
Views: 691
Size:  72.7 KB
    This is a great idea. I'm working on some minicell plugs for the inner end of pogies to fill the air gap and protect the brake cable from getting squeezed just outside the lever. Still a work in progress.
    Latitude 61

  73. #73
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    20,770
    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    I used screw in snaps, General® Canvas Screw-Snap Refill (1268) - Grommets & Grommet Tools - Ace Hardware, one the ends of my pogies to keep them in place. The "male" screw in end goes into the plastic end cap of my ODI grips, and the "female" button head rivets onto the pogie. They snap on, stay in place, but pull free easily in an emergency exit or to fold them over and out of the way when the temps heat up. It feels cleaner on the inside than with the setups with a strap, bungee or velcro around the bar end. I've used these on the neoprene Bar Mits as well as the ATV logic pogies.
    Name:  snap kit.jpg
Views: 691
Size:  72.7 KB
    I like those. The rare earth magnets I'm currently using are pretty underwhelming. They only sorta work. The strength of the hold of the magnets is attenuated pretty significantly by the end caps of the grips and the little pockets I sewed in to hold the magnets on the pogie side. Bump anything or pull a little too hard on the pogies and the magnets are pulled away.

    Quote Originally Posted by voon View Post
    Argh, you evil people and your sowing skills. Did anyone consider using Primaloft?
    I considered it, but decided against it.

    The reason is thickness. Primaloft is a very fluffy insulation. It's very thick. It insulates better when it's allowed space to loft (like down). For this application, that thickness is a disadvantage. I have Primaloft ski gloves and they're very bulky. I don't want a puffy jacket for my hands. Thinsulate is a much thinner insulation. Think about it. Thinsulate isn't used all that often for jackets, and when it is, they're pretty thin. It gets used a lot in gloves and footwear. Places where thinness is an advantage.

    insulation fabrics

    My pogies are so warm that I don't even use them until temps get below 20F. Above 20, I just use a warmer glove.

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    117
    Yes, Primaloft is an artificial down .. I bet it needs volume to store the hot air of course. What confuses me, though, is that I have a neck tube marketed as primaloft. And it's extremely thin.

    https://www.bike24.com/1.php?content...enu=1000,18,57

    Apparently you can use primaloft to make some sort of yarn you can weave into thin cloth .. these tubes are very thing cloth, nothing puffy at all and just one layer. I guess the yarn does provide microfibres through being Primaloft and being warmer than say a simialrly thin cloth of cotton. Not that it would be enough to keep subfreeze temps out ... but I wodner how much primaloft thickness you'd need. 45Nrth and Specialized both make a primaloft pogie.

    I'm not too cloth savvy for winter biking .. it's something new I start this winter (having spent decades on summerbiking I'm going to freeze to death). It can drop to -30C up in the mountains in the mornings .. so I consider pogies. Primaloft sounded great .. although there's so much stuff made by Polartec, 3M, Goretex.. it's a bit confusing to understand. I guess there's only trying it out.

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watermonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    935
    Pics of snaps on pogies - for some reason I can't edit first post. Obviously, this particular grip isn't an ODI, but any rigid end capped bar will take the screw in male snap.
    DIY Pogies-pogiesnap1.jpg
    DIY Pogies-pogiesnap2.jpg
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    117
    Very cool ... love the button idea

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,654
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I like those. The rare earth magnets I'm currently using are pretty underwhelming. They only sorta work. The strength of the hold of the magnets is attenuated pretty significantly by the end caps of the grips and the little pockets I sewed in to hold the magnets on the pogie side. Bump anything or pull a little too hard on the pogies and the magnets are pulled away..
    I believe I gave you the idea and after a few years I'm not too keen on it either. For one reason or another they fail every year. May look into the snaps.

    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Pics of snaps on pogies -
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pogiesnap1.jpg 
Views:	56 
Size:	63.6 KB 
ID:	1108156
    Do you need a special tool to close the female end? I've got a rivet tool.
    Do you need to reinforce the fabric around the hole which the female piece creates?

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watermonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    935
    The snap kit I got had the anvil and punch included to hammer "rivet" the female snap on. Similar to the setup for putting in grommets, like on a tarp. I did not reinforce or melt the thru hole for the snap head, instead using a sharp awl to split/widen the fabric rather than tear it - will probably be different depending on the fabric you're using. I figured the process of riveting on the snap would provide enough pressure between the two halves to prevent fraying of the fabric and insulation trapped between. The kit below shows snaps where both the female and male snap side rivet on - on the first pics I showed, that snap kit has a screw incorporated into the male snap instead (which is what I used). Clear as mud? If someone knows of a rigid plastic bar end cap that cams/jams into the bar end, then that could be used in conjunction with normal grips - my setup is limited right now to ODI style lock on's. I know that where it gets really cold, metal clamps on grips would suck the heat out of you - a bomber end cap would allow one to do this with foam grips as well.
    DIY Pogies-snap-kit-w-anvil.jpg
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,654
    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    ........If someone knows of a rigid plastic bar end cap that cams/jams into the bar end, then that could be used in conjunction with normal grips - ............ a bomber end cap would allow one to do this with foam grips as well.
    There are lots of plastic screw in end plugs available in the BMX market.
    My son just so happens to have these used with a Cane Creek foam grip.
    ODI Thug Plug Plastic Bar Ends at J&R Bicycles

Members who have read this thread: 9

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •