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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
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    DIY: Bash ring for Surly MWOD (58 BCD / 26 t)

    Because Surly wouldn't make one, I did. I started with a 125 x 40 mm utility wheel:



    I used a thick sharpie to make a reference line to center the chainring, which I used to place the markings for holes quickly, yet accurately enough:



    I drilled some pilot holes and used screws to keep the chainring in place to prevent it from moving:



    Gotta narrow it down. Luckily I have the hands of a brain surgeon:



    Tidying up the sawed part with a file and abrasive paper:



    After sketching the parts to be removed, I swiss-cheesed them and did the removal with a saw:





    I had to break the circle to let the crank through. This does make installation easier, as the crank or pedal don't need to be removed. All corners are rounded to prevent stress points that could allow a crack to start:



    Finally it fits! Shown from the outside and inside:





    On the bike:





    Results:

    - About 16 USD spent.
    - Four hours of thinking, drawing and working on the piece trying different methods.
    - A working bash ring!!!

  2. #2
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    nice!

  3. #3
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    Thanks!

    If anyone is thinking about making one of their own, here's how to get the shape more easily:

    After drilling the bolt holes, swiss-cheese the middle to remove enough material for the BB spindle to fit through. Then bolt the MWOD chainring and bash ring together and slide it on the spindle until it bottoms out. You should be able to start attaching the chainring on the crank with long bolts. Obviously it will not go on further (as it bottomed out already), but now you can use the shape of the crank arm to copy the outline to the bash ring with a sharpie.

  4. #4
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    awesome !

  5. #5
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    Idea! nice work Saul, I had considered running my MWOD with just the small ring. How

    is that working for you and why did you decide to drop the 33 or 36 ring?

    My friend and I had changed to a 33/20, 33/24 and 33/26 set ups respectively on our 907s but had nagging shifting issues. For myself, the 33/26 was too close from a ratio perspective but I mostly ran around in the 26 ring anyway. Do you have any full size side photos? Neat little project.

  6. #6
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    I built the bike from parts, and the crankset was actually just a Mr. Whirly with a Moonlander spindle and I got a MWOD small ring separately, so there was no big ring to drop. I wanted a single front ring to keep the thing simpler and save some weight. At 26/11 I get as much speed as I care to have on a fat bike, and 26/34 allows me to crawl anywhere. When commuting on flat and hard surfaces, I usually don't go higher than 26/13, so the high end of the range seems spot on for my use. With a range that suits me at both ends, an extra front ring and derailleur would be unnecessary.

    I haven't been biking outside when light is sufficient and a side shot of a fat bike indoors would look wrong. When we get some more daytime light here in the north I'll get a proper side shot in a suitable element.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    I built the bike from parts, and the crankset was actually just a Mr. Whirly with a Moonlander spindle and I got a MWOD small ring separately, so there was no big ring to drop. I wanted a single front ring to keep the thing simpler and save some weight. At 26/11 I get as much speed as I care to have on a fat bike, and 26/34 allows me to crawl anywhere. When commuting on flat and hard surfaces, I usually don't go higher than 26/13, so the high end of the range seems spot on for my use. With a range that suits me at both ends, an extra front ring and derailleur would be unnecessary.

    I haven't been biking outside when light is sufficient and a side shot of a fat bike indoors would look wrong. When we get some more daytime light here in the north I'll get a proper side shot in a suitable element.
    I went on a 9 mile snow ride yesterday, and never shifted out of my granny ring (I'm running the 20/33 set). I've been thinking about just taking the front derailleur and shifter off...

  8. #8
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    i ditched the front der and shifter entirely and just run the a doulbe. i mostly ride single track and rarely need anything other than the granny, if i'm riding 2 track or back roads/paths i just drop the chain onto the middle with my fingers.

  9. #9
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    Kinta, that's one way to shed parts to keep things simple and a bit lighter. Some ultra light randonneurs do that with their touring bikes.

    Here's a side shot in a more natural element, yet horribly dull light. I'm on Töölö Bay and the building in the background is the national Opera.


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