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  1. #1
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    Cutting weight where it matters...

    This winter, I replaced wheels, crank, pretty much the entire drive train on my puglsey. The only original parts are the frame and the fork. Did it make much of a difference? No, it did not.

    Also this winter, I stared eating better.

    Dropped maybe 4 or 5 pounds off the bike.

    Dropped 25 or 30 pounds off my ass.

    Guess which one made a difference?

    Been off the fatbike since winter. mostly riding on the road, pretty much same as last year. Got the fatbike out yesterday, rode the same set of trails as usual. Except, climbing was easier. Distance was easier. Everything was easier. Losing weight off the bike did jack. Losing weight, that made a difference. Cheaper, too.

    I lost about an entire Puglsey worth of fat.

    Climbing, stronger, easier, faster. Hills felt flatter.

    Been thinking about replacing my pugsley with something lighter. Carbon fork, alloy frame, whatever. Think I'll skip it. I've still got about 15 pounds to go on my ass. Not thinking I need to lose any more off the bike.

  2. #2
    Nuts
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
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    Congrats man, not an easy feat!!
    And I love beer!!

  3. #3
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    Nice, keep at it - you're well equipped to keep at it right through the winter

    I'm only down 15lb, but gained muscle, now I don't dread the hills at all, just have to figure out log rolls so I don't look like an amateur still on them.

  4. #4
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    I didn't have my fatbike until February, so I started the fatbike season pretty late and rather portly. I have ridden it a great deal, but took my klunker out for a ride last night...nearly 40# of American steel. A hill that used to demand the granny ring on the old Hiawatha is now doable at 36/21. I'm thinking of SS!

  5. #5
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    I wonder do you burn any more calories going the same distance, uphill or otherwise in a higher gear?

    You may be exerting more force, but you are going faster, so will be doing it for less time, but the amount of work done is more, since time is not a factor in work=force x distance.

    But, if you are going faster, you can stop working earlier, and coast to the same distance.

    So, who wants to venture to figure if climbing a hill in a lower gear saves any energy?

  6. #6
    Fat & Single
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    Quote Originally Posted by autodoctor911 View Post

    So, who wants to venture to figure if climbing a hill in a lower gear saves any energy?
    I read a few articles on smart training and they reckon a cadence of 80-90 (or there abouts) is the most energy saving speed.

    I don't use cadence or heart rate, I don't even have a bike computer but I did ride a singlespeed for quite a while and now im loving 1 x 10.

    So yes I reckon the lower gear saves energy but its probably slower than the guy cranking the big gear.

    Well done on losing the pug - Buckfiddy
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Been thinking about replacing my pugsley with something lighter. Carbon fork, alloy frame, whatever. Think I'll skip it. I've still got about 15 pounds to go on my ass. Not thinking I need to lose any more off the bike.
    Congrats!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  8. #8
    addicted to chunk
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    Very nice, congrats!
    Wish more riders would figure this out
    Riding.....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Very nice, congrats!
    Wish more riders would figure this out
    Yeah but then you don't get the fun of spending $400 to lose 300 grams

    This thread is a good reminder... I need to stop eating gas station cookies in the morning!

  10. #10
    will rant for food
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    What you haven't counted is what you've added, and that is some undetermined but probably significant amount of time to your life.

    And it's "free" versus hundreds/thousands of dollars of bike weight optimization.

    Good job.

    Had myself a chuckle when some budget hydro brakes I was considering were described heavy, as measured in extra grams. Adorable. (Clarks S2 btw... we'll see)
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  11. #11
    Nuts
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    I now have lost 15lbs since my surgery and I would like to say I worked hard at it but in all reality the credit goes to my wife for forgetting to feed me
    And I love beer!!

  12. #12
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    Goodjob Brah!! I usualy wear a shiteload of super big thick 24k gold chains with big swinging azz medalions and hood ornaments and shite when I ride, but now this got me thinking about cooling all that for a ride to see what happens. Plus I got like a condo on my wrist I could lose, so we'll see how it goes.
    Also I think if you take a big dump just before you ride its like upgrading to a carbon fork.

  13. #13
    addicted to chunk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    Also I think if you take a big dump just before you ride its like upgrading to a carbon fork.
    Haha exactly
    Riding.....

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    Also I think if you take a big dump just before you ride its like upgrading to a carbon fork.
    +1 - I'd rather have a good dump than a carbon fork...
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  15. #15
    Sup
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I now have lost 15lbs since my surgery and I would like to say I worked hard at it but in all reality the credit goes to my wife for forgetting to feed me
    you left yourself wide open here
    the crappy things I could have said but.....
    I really don't want to kick a man when he is down
    see ya this week end sir
    I am slow therefore I am

  16. #16
    nothing to see here
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    I now have lost 15lbs since my surgery and I would like to say I worked hard at it but in all reality the credit goes to my wife for forgetting to feed me
    I gained 10lbs since my surgery. Some credit to my wife for feeding me, but more so to myself for eating it all.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Been thinking about replacing my pugsley with something lighter. Carbon fork, alloy frame, whatever. Think I'll skip it. I've still got about 15 pounds to go on my ass. Not thinking I need to lose any more off the bike.
    Do both

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by druidh View Post
    Do both
    Meh. It is pretty clear that standards are no where near locked down in any way shape or form, so I'ma sit back, ride the pugs and it's mostly easily sourced parts and wait for the dust to clear.

    We gots suspension forks coming, thru-axels to deal with, carbon, aluminum, 135, 150, 170, 186, 190 for rear hubs... I think I'm good for a while.

    If I do treat myself to anything, it'll be repainting the crap-tastic super generic white paint job.

  19. #19
    Human Test Subject
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    carver forks are comfy no matter what you weigh.

  20. #20
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    I have lost weight - but off my left leg.... stupid pinched nerve in my back..

    I have never weighed a single bike I owned... and I never blame the bike for making me slower.

    Power to weight ratios always work out... Look at the the Tour winners...
    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  21. #21
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    Who cares about standards?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    Who cares about standards?
    I do.

    The 135mm offset standard. Short axles, lighter and more versatile.

    However fat bikes are throwing up all sorts of new challenges for manufacturers jumping into the fat pond. Like how to create a design that uses their proprietary part so you can't buy anything but their bits etc.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
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  23. #23
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    The existence of 170mm hubs didn't make 135mm hubs vanish into thin air. 190mm hubs aren't going to make 170mm hubs vanish into thin air. There will be many options to choose from, for a long time.

    Just because something different and newer comes out, do you start having less fun out on your rides on your current bike? No, its just as fun as it ever was.

    Bike companies are always going to be trying to make money. Worrying about "standards" seems like a waste of energy. Just buy what you like and ride it.

  24. #24
    Fail again. Fail better.
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckfiddious View Post
    Dropped 25 or 30 pounds off my ass.
    That's the way to go ultralight. Good effort, congrats!

    "big dump > carbon fork"
    Roads? Where we're going we don't need roads. -Dr Emmett Brown

  25. #25
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    Nice job! I'm still well locked in Clyde status- in the best "shape" of my life, but I have had a heck of the time overcoming the eating aspect to go with the riding. The more I ride, the more voracious my appetite. My body does a great job maintaining status quo.
    I think I have the endurance/muscle to be competitive at some of the races I do- just need to drop 50lb so I can take my same effort level but increase my speed.

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