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  1. #1
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    Carbon Mukluk Fenders

    These have been a while in the making and I feel they are far enough along now to share with you guys. The goals for this project were full coverage (not just me but more importantly the drivetrain), not too heavy, quick to get on/off, and lastly they need to blend in with the finish and materials of my 2012 muk2. Another late goal to the show is fitting Bud up front (thank you Santa!).

    Here are some pics of the build, I will follow up shortly with some of the final result.

    Pic 1: The core of the 'plug'. A couple good old boys you know with some carved extruded polystyrene taped to it.

    Pic 2: The above carefully wrapped with a blanket folded 3/4" thick (don't tell my wife) and then topped with heat shrink window film. There is also one layer of surface coat in this picture if you look close (epoxy resin with filler) .

    Pic 3: Garage porn: the finished mold after LOTS of sanding and polishing. There is a freshly laid up front fender in it, two cured rear fenders to the left (one trimmed, one un-trimmed), and some carbon cloth to the right. Also note my makeshift incubator; epoxy resin needs room temp to cure.

    Pic 4: All the carbon parts needed for two sets rough trimmed. The U shaped pieces will hold the front fender(s) to the fork crown and the 8 tabs will attach the stays. The long pieces will sandwich the front flap to the fender.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carbon Mukluk Fenders-img_1892.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-img_1891.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-10_04_2012-0751-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_05_2012-1437-.jpg  

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  2. #2
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    Looks promising and nice and light.

    Admire your courage using the blanket, but for full marks the job should be done in the kitchen
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
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    The 2x2 3k twill weave carbon is covered with satin UV-resistant clear coat. The 6061 3/8" od thin wall aluminum stays are coated with rattle can truck bed liner (matches the black salsa anodizing just about perfect). It only takes 1 tool to get them on or off (4mm hex), no need to remove either wheel, and it's about a 30 second ordeal. Together they weigh just less than 1.75 lbs rtr.

    Bring on the slush!

    Pic 1: Glam shot

    Pic 2: Quick release pin with lanyard. Haters gonna hate but she holds just fine through the tough stuff. Bud worthy girth... 4.75" wide.

    Pic 3: This shows how the front flap is sandwiched and how the stays attach. The carbon tabs are epoxied to the fender and then riveted to the stay. The plastic washers protect the carbon and make for a pin type connection so the stays can fold flat for storage or pivot when the fender gets hit.

    Pic 4/5: The rear is attached to each stay bridge on the bike with releasable zip ties. You can't really see it, but the fenders are notched at both the fork and the seat stay to maximize clearance.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_26_2012-1505-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1516-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_26_2012-1507-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1514-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1515-.jpg  

    Last edited by Dustin Mustangs; 11-30-2012 at 11:39 AM.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Looks promising and nice and light.

    Admire your courage using the blanket, but for full marks the job should be done in the kitchen
    I was right up in her kitchen with the first pic!

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  5. #5
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    Wow, nicely done.

  6. #6
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    wooohoooo, a thread where someone built something rad!! It's been too long since we've had one of these in the fattie forum - the tinkerers have gone quiet of late. They look awesome, great job!

  7. #7
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    Wow, those look perfect.

  8. #8
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    The finish looks really good, and the quick release pin is a good idea.
    When do you start taking in orders ?

    Great job !

  9. #9
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    Thumbs up buddy.

    Velo - my wife did not approve of a 40" wood lathe going in the kitchen, nor the... well I'll get to that later. Anyway I hear marriage is about compromise.

    Nicely done. Hits my nerd button!
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  10. #10
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    nice work!

  11. #11
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    Also your incubator is just fine. You can get some (relatively) low wattage IR bulbs at Home Depot. Park a pair of them out about 5 inches and you can easily get above 250F.
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  12. #12
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    BEAUTIFUL

    Nice work!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    ...Anyway I hear marriage is about compromise...
    Sure is, that's why I let my wife use my "workshop" as a kitchen.

    (Checks over shoulder to make sure wife is not watching )
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 57º36' Highlands, Scotland

  14. #14
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    Thanks for all the positive replies, I am pretty happy with how they turned out.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    Thanks for all the positive replies, I am pretty happy with how they turned out.
    well earned with greenie rep

  16. #16
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    Crazy silly, but great work, but a excessive use of carbon. Love the look

  17. #17
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    AWESOME!!! Can we be your distributor?

  18. #18
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    That looks BEAUTIFUL! Good job. Now make some for a 9:ZERO:7!

  19. #19
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    Very cool.

  20. #20
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    Makes me think that... 'maybe' I could do something like that?

    Great results! Thanks for posting your project.

  21. #21
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    There are few if any specialized tools or skills needed to make something out of a composite. That's the beauty of working with them imo. What is needed is a TON of man hours. This is labor intensive work! I bet I have somewhere around 100 hours in just the molds, which btw both front and rear use the same one. It's kind of a hobby of mine so I don't mind that aspect of it though.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    There are few if any specialized tools or skills needed to make something out of a composite. That's the beauty of working with them imo.
    That's what attracted me to composites as well. You're limited by imagination and patience. If those aren't limits, then... yeah. Patience is a problem for me, one that I'm working on... with some success.

    That said there are some specialized tools that make stuff easier. But generally, if you had to glance at my current workspace, one's first thought would probably be "woodworking".
    Disclaimer: I run Regular Cycles (as of 2016). As a profiteer of the bicycle industry, I am not to be taken very seriously.

  23. #23
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    Very nicely done! Looks very professional!

    Curious, does the front rear have to hang down so low? Seems like you may catch it on a log or rock depending how you roll over something on the trail? Just curious.

    Again, great job, look awesome!

  24. #24
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    Yeah, the front comes down very low . I wanted the flap, even when swinging back a bit, to protect the bottom portion of the crank sprockets, the chain and even the lower portion of the derailleur cage from crud coming off the front tire. It needs to be very close the ground to do that. And a flap can only be so long and still hang in an effective position when the wind is acting on it.

    I've got a good amount of saddle time on a prototype version that was even lower (by over an inch) and I never hit anything with it. Going over logs, through brush, up and down creek embankments, ect and not a single issue. The only reason I shortened the final version from that was so the bike would still stand on the fork with the front wheel off (as apposed to the back of the fender).

    I'm sure it will get hit eventually but I'm not worried about it. The stays can pivot at both ends and you'd be surprised how far that carbon can bend before it is damaged. For example, I accidentally bent the portion behind the stays on a rear fender all the way down to the tire. No damage at all, not even spider cracks.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  25. #25
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    100 HOURS????

    Holy hell man!

    I think I spent <20 on my entire bike

  26. #26
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    100 hours x $whatever/hour = most expensive fenders ever!

    They do look nice, though...

  27. #27
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    You don't want to know what my billable rate is! lol Maybe you guys missed it, but composites are a hobby for me. And imo hobbies are about the journey, not the destination.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  28. #28
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    OOOOOEEEeeeee!!!!!! Those are sweet. I envy your tactile tenacity.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    Maybe you guys missed it, but composites are a hobby for me. And imo hobbies are about the journey, not the destination.
    Preach on, brother. Amen.
    Responds to gravity

  30. #30
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    Love the fenders. Love that you've spent an inordinate amount of time on them - the only way that new and truly unique and really rad sh!t comes into existence, is through people like you that have ideas and the passion to throw down and make them happen. The bar for fenders just got a little higher.

    I'm impressed with the straightness of the edges. They had to've been all raggedy after coming off the mold and at that point they must also have been all kinds of floppy and hard to handle. How'd you manage such a tidy job with the trimming?

  31. #31
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    The fenders stay in the mold until they are about 90% cured, so they are quite stiff when I literally pop them out. Then I dress up like a redneck would going into a fallout zone and have at them with an arsenal of cutting and shaping tools that includes a rotary tool with carbide cut-off wheel, a bench mounted belt sander, and finally a hand file. The pic showing the mold in use also shows fenders in each of of these stages.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  32. #32
    DIY all the way
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    Nice to see another composite buff

    Magura

  33. #33
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    I took them off to replace that gorilla tape so here are a few pics off the bike.

    Pic 1: Stays folded for storage. This is a bigger feature than I initially thought. Not only does it make them much more compact, but the stays are also less vulnerable to damage.

    Pic 2: Cutout for the seat stay, zip tie attachment, and self retaining hardware. All hardware needed to mount them stays attached to the fenders when removed.

    Pic 3: Opposite side of pic 2, shows the lizard skin 'bumper' used to isolate the fender from the frame. This stuff is used in a couple of different places on the fenders and on the bike, carbon and metal do not play well together.

    PS - I updated a few of the original finished pics here now that the guerrilla tape has been replaced with lizard skin.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1510-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1511-.jpg  

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-11_30_2012-1512-.jpg  

    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  34. #34
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    ...is very sweet.

    You should be proud!

  35. #35
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    This is my first post here! LOOKS SWEEEEEEETTTTT!!!!!!!!!!

  36. #36
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    Absolutely sensational and fantastic work done by an enthusiast

  37. #37
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    Thanks guys. I've got quite a few miles and a whole winter on them now and I'll have to say they are just what the doctor ordered. I get a little slop over the back every once in a while but most times its just when I loose traction and the wheel spins. Never being able to leave good enough alone, I will probably try experimenting with a rubber spoiler style flap back there just for fun.

    I changed the rear one a bit at the chainstay bridge since originally posting this. That is a pinch point clearance wise so I modified the fender to sit on top of the bridge as apposed to passing between it and the tire. This makes it so the only thing compromising the clearance there is the zip tie.


    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-04_10_2013-2679-.jpg

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-04_10_2013-2681-.jpg


    Oh, and BFF (bud fits fine)...

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-04_10_2013-2647-.jpg
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  38. #38
    Specialized Fatboy
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    Very Nice!

  39. #39
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    Thanks! I am well into the third season on these now and they are holding up great. Plenty of hard crashes and bush whacking along the way too.

    I think I might make another run of them this summer just for fun. Not that it really matters on a fatbike, but I figure I can save the better part of a pound by vac bagging a slightly thinner layup.
    Whatever floats your bike, dude

  40. #40
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    Super cool.

  41. #41
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    Very nice work. I am considering to ake some fenders myself. Previously I have made 3 climbing/caving helmets out of Carbon and Kevlar. Lightweight and solid. Facebook pics This was my very first one. Outer finish and weight was improved in the 2. and 3. go.

    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-1233220_10153144603745431_1966047713_o.jpgCarbon Mukluk Fenders-1040721_10151464059722414_512163023_o.jpg

    Chinese carbon frame and rims, ICAN SN03.
    Carbon Mukluk Fenders-2015-01-03-13.55.46.jpg

    What kind of weight did you end at?

    Are there similar kind of plastic fenders commercial available?

  42. #42
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    Thanks man.

    They weigh a bit less than 1.75 lbs, so about the same as a full water bottle. I have a vac bag setup now and figure it and a thinner schedule could get these a good half pound or more lighter over the wet layup I used originally. Weight isn't a big concern for me on a fat bike so I probably won't bother until one breaks.

    Not sure what the current fender options are but there were no direct bolt on offerings when I made these.

  43. #43
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    How many layers of carbon fabric did you use? I think I had 5 layers in my helmets; Car-Kev-C-K-C. Rock solid helmet, about 200 gram, or about 6.5 oz. I first made a mold of my skull, out of gypsum. I added about 5mm of extra material to the mold, so that I had room for some softer 2 x 2 cm pads on the inside of the helmet. So its a very "personal" helmet.

  44. #44
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    I used what I call the Oreo. Two layers of carbon sandwiching a layer of biaxial glass, can't remember if it was 12 or 17 oz. Not the lightest layup but it looks good and has great material performance.

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