Carbon Mukluk Fenders

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  • 11-26-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    4 Attachment(s)
    Carbon Mukluk Fenders
    These have been a while in the making and I feel they are far enough along now to share with you guys. The goals for this project were full coverage (not just me but more importantly the drivetrain), not too heavy, quick to get on/off, and lastly they need to blend in with the finish and materials of my 2012 muk2. Another late goal to the show is fitting Bud up front (thank you Santa!).

    Here are some pics of the build, I will follow up shortly with some of the final result.

    Pic 1: The core of the 'plug'. A couple good old boys you know with some carved extruded polystyrene taped to it.

    Pic 2: The above carefully wrapped with a blanket folded 3/4" thick (don't tell my wife) and then topped with heat shrink window film. There is also one layer of surface coat in this picture if you look close (epoxy resin with filler) .

    Pic 3: Garage porn: the finished mold after LOTS of sanding and polishing. There is a freshly laid up front fender in it, two cured rear fenders to the left (one trimmed, one un-trimmed), and some carbon cloth to the right. Also note my makeshift incubator; epoxy resin needs room temp to cure.

    Pic 4: All the carbon parts needed for two sets rough trimmed. The U shaped pieces will hold the front fender(s) to the fork crown and the 8 tabs will attach the stays. The long pieces will sandwich the front flap to the fender.
  • 11-26-2012
    Velobike
    Looks promising and nice and light.

    Admire your courage using the blanket, but for full marks the job should be done in the kitchen :)
  • 11-26-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    5 Attachment(s)
    The 2x2 3k twill weave carbon is covered with satin UV-resistant clear coat. The 6061 3/8" od thin wall aluminum stays are coated with rattle can truck bed liner (matches the black salsa anodizing just about perfect). It only takes 1 tool to get them on or off (4mm hex), no need to remove either wheel, and it's about a 30 second ordeal. Together they weigh just less than 1.75 lbs rtr.

    Bring on the slush!

    Pic 1: Glam shot

    Pic 2: Quick release pin with lanyard. Haters gonna hate but she holds just fine through the tough stuff. Bud worthy girth... 4.75" wide.

    Pic 3: This shows how the front flap is sandwiched and how the stays attach. The carbon tabs are epoxied to the fender and then riveted to the stay. The plastic washers protect the carbon and make for a pin type connection so the stays can fold flat for storage or pivot when the fender gets hit.

    Pic 4/5: The rear is attached to each stay bridge on the bike with releasable zip ties. You can't really see it, but the fenders are notched at both the fork and the seat stay to maximize clearance.
  • 11-26-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Velobike View Post
    Looks promising and nice and light.

    Admire your courage using the blanket, but for full marks the job should be done in the kitchen :)

    I was right up in her kitchen with the first pic!

    :eekster:
  • 11-26-2012
    Omiak
    Wow, nicely done.
  • 11-27-2012
    ocean breathes salty
    wooohoooo, a thread where someone built something rad!! It's been too long since we've had one of these in the fattie forum - the tinkerers have gone quiet of late. They look awesome, great job!
  • 11-27-2012
    GTR2ebike
    Wow, those look perfect.
  • 11-27-2012
    Rabies010
    The finish looks really good, and the quick release pin is a good idea.
    When do you start taking in orders ?

    Great job ! :thumbsup:
  • 11-27-2012
    Drew Diller
    Thumbs up buddy.

    Velo - my wife did not approve of a 40" wood lathe going in the kitchen, nor the... well I'll get to that later. Anyway I hear marriage is about compromise.

    Nicely done. Hits my nerd button!
  • 11-27-2012
    AC/BC
    nice work! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
  • 11-27-2012
    Drew Diller
    Also your incubator is just fine. You can get some (relatively) low wattage IR bulbs at Home Depot. Park a pair of them out about 5 inches and you can easily get above 250F.
  • 11-27-2012
    SJJ28
    BEAUTIFUL

    Nice work!
  • 11-27-2012
    Velobike
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    ...Anyway I hear marriage is about compromise...

    Sure is, that's why I let my wife use my "workshop" as a kitchen.

    (Checks over shoulder to make sure wife is not watching :) )
  • 11-27-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    Thanks for all the positive replies, I am pretty happy with how they turned out.
  • 11-27-2012
    nvphatty
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    Thanks for all the positive replies, I am pretty happy with how they turned out.

    well earned with greenie rep :D
  • 11-27-2012
    bbracket
    Crazy silly, but great work, but a excessive use of carbon. Love the look
  • 11-27-2012
    NOBBY605
    AWESOME!!! Can we be your distributor? :thumbsup:
  • 11-27-2012
    tracerprix
    That looks BEAUTIFUL! Good job. Now make some for a 9:ZERO:7!
  • 11-27-2012
    Tipstall
    Very cool.
  • 11-28-2012
    Sand Rat
    Makes me think that... 'maybe' I could do something like that?

    Great results! Thanks for posting your project.
  • 11-28-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    There are few if any specialized tools or skills needed to make something out of a composite. That's the beauty of working with them imo. What is needed is a TON of man hours. This is labor intensive work! I bet I have somewhere around 100 hours in just the molds, which btw both front and rear use the same one. It's kind of a hobby of mine so I don't mind that aspect of it though.
  • 11-28-2012
    Drew Diller
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dustin Mustangs View Post
    There are few if any specialized tools or skills needed to make something out of a composite. That's the beauty of working with them imo.

    That's what attracted me to composites as well. You're limited by imagination and patience. If those aren't limits, then... yeah. Patience is a problem for me, one that I'm working on... with some success.

    That said there are some specialized tools that make stuff easier. But generally, if you had to glance at my current workspace, one's first thought would probably be "woodworking".
  • 11-28-2012
    Shark
    Very nicely done! Looks very professional!

    Curious, does the front rear have to hang down so low? Seems like you may catch it on a log or rock depending how you roll over something on the trail? Just curious.

    Again, great job, look awesome!
  • 11-28-2012
    Dustin Mustangs
    Yeah, the front comes down very low . I wanted the flap, even when swinging back a bit, to protect the bottom portion of the crank sprockets, the chain and even the lower portion of the derailleur cage from crud coming off the front tire. It needs to be very close the ground to do that. And a flap can only be so long and still hang in an effective position when the wind is acting on it.

    I've got a good amount of saddle time on a prototype version that was even lower (by over an inch) and I never hit anything with it. Going over logs, through brush, up and down creek embankments, ect and not a single issue. The only reason I shortened the final version from that was so the bike would still stand on the fork with the front wheel off (as apposed to the back of the fender).

    I'm sure it will get hit eventually but I'm not worried about it. The stays can pivot at both ends and you'd be surprised how far that carbon can bend before it is damaged. For example, I accidentally bent the portion behind the stays on a rear fender all the way down to the tire. No damage at all, not even spider cracks.
  • 11-28-2012
    2silent
    100 HOURS????

    Holy hell man!

    I think I spent <20 on my entire bike