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Thread: Canyon Dude

  1. #1
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    Canyon Dude

    Are there any reasons not to buy the Canyon Dude CF 8.0. This seems like a reasonably good deal. Any other suggestions as well?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    beer thief
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    Might be info in this thread: The Canyon Dude Wait Club

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    For $300 more I'd get the 9.0, which includes a Bluto and better components.

    As an alternative, I'd look at the Wozo, better adjustability on drop outs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    For $300 more I'd get the 9.0, which includes a Bluto and better components.

    As an alternative, I'd look at the Wozo, better adjustability on drop outs.
    I think you may have been looking at the versions available in overseas. It looks like both USA versions have the carbon fork.

    I'll look at the Wozo, thanks.

    I have a set of 29plus wheels looking for a bike. Prefer going the fat bike route so I can have one bike for all seasons.

  5. #5
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    I was looking at that bike (online) over the weekend. If it ever becomes a reality and available, it's a smoking deal and they'll sell the shit out of.

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    Just imagine if they built a full suspension fatbike!

    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedaddict View Post
    I was looking at that bike (online) over the weekend. If it ever becomes a reality and available, it's a smoking deal and they'll sell the shit out of.

  7. #7
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    I own a Dude 9.0 unlimited, which I use for winter riding. For the money it's pretty unbeatable imho, but there are a few minor niggles:

    - The fork can't fit a brake rotor smaller than 180mm.
    - The rear can only fit a 160mm rotor.
    - The adjustable dropout at the rear only give two positions, and is much too finicky to use trailside.
    - The forward dropout position won't fit a true 4.8" tire on hundos.
    - Only one bottle cage mount.
    - The e*13 cranks are less-than-ideal for a bunch of reasons (although it looks like the 8.0 comes with Race Face cranks anyway...)

    A lot of these things are subjective, so ymmv. Otherwise there's a lot to like about the bike.

  8. #8
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    I literally just received my Canyon Dude cf 8.0 this week, and I highly (HIGHLY) recommend it. I was tempted because Canyon had a sale which meant I got mine for AUS$2500, and took a bit of a risk as I'd not seen one in the flesh.
    Well I'm mightily impressed. The bike is pretty light (a little over 12kg), but it really climbs well. My other bike is a Santa Cruz trc and it out climbs that easily, despite being 1.5kg heavier. Mine is fully rigid but it doesn't feel harsh like a regular rigid bike would as the front tyre's so huge and squashy. I'm not seeing any real need to put the Bluto on the front at the moment.
    That said I've changed the grips on mine, as the stock ones are thin and super hard. Down the line I'd be tempted to swap the aluminium bar out for a carbon one too as that'll also provide a little more comfort.
    But these are the details, the important bits are the frame, wheels and drivetrain, all of which are excellent. I hadn't used the SRAM NX gears before but they seem just fine.
    Value for money wise I think it's an awesome deal. Rides great out of the box, and has potential for a few choice upgrades down the line. For me adding a dropper post and going tubeless are on the cards, and I can see me riding this more often than the Santa Cruz.

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    Only a 160mm rotor out back? That's a bummer.

    I can't imagine changing drop out positions on the trail, that's a garage or camping change when swapping wheels.

    Forward position not fitting a 4.8 is not a suprise, the forward position is short and a 4.8 is tall.

    [QUOTE=JoCo;13324937]I own a Dude 9.0 unlimited, which I use for winter riding. For the money it's pretty unbeatable imho, but there are a few minor niggles:

  10. #10
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    180 mm rotor back Ė no problem (itís a bit overkill Ė but the 200 mm rotor with Shimano Zee at the Bluto is great).

    Front drop out position = 160 mm rotor
    Rear drop out position = 180 mm rotor

    Think the adjustable dropout is not designed to do the change at trailside because you have to change the disc rotor too.




  11. #11
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    If the 12kg weight is accurate before going tubeless, that 8.0 is a steal at that price IMHO

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    Pretty sure the weight is accurate. Mine feels that light. And like you said, make it tubeless and you're around 11.5kg, which is impressive for the price.

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    Definitely on my long-term upgrade list. If only I could get one out in Africa. Reckon they would sell the crap out of all their bikes if they sorted distribution.
    Unless I'm missing something, most fatties at this price are the best part of 30lbs

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I can't imagine changing drop out positions on the trail, that's a garage or camping change when swapping wheels.
    Or for changing your front/rear weight bias when riding in different types of snow.

    If it took 20secs to change then it's definitely something I would use regularly, at least at the start of each ride, depending on the conditions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoCo View Post
    Or for changing your front/rear weight bias when riding in different types of snow.

    If it took 20secs to change then it's definitely something I would use regularly, at least at the start of each ride, depending on the conditions.
    The reason for the changeability is to give you a shorter wheelbase with smaller wheels for better control (or rearwheel less far out from your body). the idea the closer the rear wheel is to you the better riding control. So you only would change it when you change wheel sizes. You also would have to adjust chain length.

    As for the bike, I had seriously considered buying it since it has a very good $/value ratio. Also the very high quality components (DT Swiss hubs etc.) show they didn't cut corners. This bike should be better quality than most LBS brands since they don't tell you anything about the hubs (or have their own name brand).
    I called them about availability of the 8.0 and they said end of October. I ultimately bought a Sturgis NX from BikesDirect for $1,100 since I felt as a beginner this is too good for me. But still think it is a great value.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    The reason for the changeability is to give you a shorter wheelbase with smaller wheels for better control (or rearwheel less far out from your body). the idea the closer the rear wheel is to you the better riding control. So you only would change it when you change wheel sizes. You also would have to adjust chain length.
    Riding in snow is a very different set of rules when it comes to things like the effects of chainstay length.

    Also, a 16mm difference in length is well within the capacity of most rear derailleurs.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue66 View Post
    180 mm rotor back Ė no problem (itís a bit overkill Ė but the 200 mm rotor with Shimano Zee at the Bluto is great).

    Front drop out position = 160 mm rotor
    Rear drop out position = 180 mm rotor

    Think the adjustable dropout is not designed to do the change at trailside because you have to change the disc rotor too.



    You gotta change the caliper position when change the dropout position?

    Okay, now that's crappy design!

    Wozo.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    You gotta change the caliper position when change the dropout position?

    Okay, now that's crappy design!

    Wozo.
    Yes, youíre right, you have to change the position of the caliper too.
    As I said before Ė I donít think itís designed to do the change at trailside. For example at my DH-Bike (alu frame) itís possible to change the drop out position at trailside including the position of the caliper too (see pic below). But I donít know if a similar design is possible at a carbon frame and the system at my DH-Bike is definitely heavier. And to be honest Iíve done this only once at both bikes after IĎve found my preferred position.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue66 View Post
    Yes, youíre right, you have to change the position of the caliper too.
    As I said before Ė I donít think itís designed to do the change at trailside. For example at my DH-Bike (alu frame) itís possible to change the drop out position at trailside including the position of the caliper too (see pic below). But I donít know if a similar design is possible at a carbon frame and the system at my DH-Bike is definitely heavier. And to be honest Iíve done this only once at both bikes after IĎve found my preferred position.
    The carbon Farleys use a similar system. You're right though, it's heavier (and crucially: more expensive).

    I can only speak for myself, but, I think a sliding design is preferable on a snow bike, both for squeezing in different tires and adapting to different types of terrain.

  20. #20
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    I use the rear drop out position for summer (4.0) and winter tires (4.8) Ė even in the rear position the Dude is extremely manoeuvrable (compared with my DH-Bike).
    I have to admit that Iím too lazy to change the setup contstantly - prefer more riding the bike.

  21. #21
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    There is nothing wrong with the design. It was meant to be adjusted on the trail. Find a setting you like, that fits the tire you like and leave it at that

  22. #22
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    I don't see the issue with the design, you might swap it 2 times a year when you go between 4.8s and 4.0 tires. I just left mine in the longest setting and use B&L all the time.

    There's a guy in the Facebook group who managed to fit 2XLs, but on 65mm rims.

  23. #23
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    same idea as the Farley (as mentioned above) and i change my Farley twice a year.

    Farley needs a 20 mm socket and ratchet, so that's not a trail side repair either.
    Mike
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    2017 Trek Farley 9.6 with Lauf
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc

  24. #24
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    Does anyone know what the rear spacing is on the Dude? Canít seem to find it on their site. What about the B.B. shell?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Does anyone know what the rear spacing is on the Dude? Canít seem to find it on their site. What about the B.B. shell?
    It has a 197mm rear thru axle. The BB shell is 41mm x 121 press fit. I've had my Dude 8.0 for a month now and am thouroghly pleased.

    More info on another thread in the Canyon Forum.

    Caynyon Dude Fatbike - 2018 Model Comming Soon to the USA?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff_L View Post
    It has a 197mm rear thru axle. The BB shell is 41mm x 121 press fit. I've had my Dude 8.0 for a month now and am thouroghly pleased.

    More info on another thread in the Canyon Forum.

    Caynyon Dude Fatbike - 2018 Model Comming Soon to the USA?
    Thank you! Really wish I could buy this bike, but the wide q factor kills it for me (although it's not bad for a bike able to fit 4.8" tires). I'll probably be looking at the RM Suzi Q or Otso.

  27. #27
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    Canyon Dude being pushed to the limits by the GMBN team

    https://youtu.be/wjy9Jgnjv6U

  28. #28
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    The Canyon cyberweek sale price was too good to pass up, so my med. Dude 8.0 arrived yesterday, 6 days from order to Minn. Sturdy box and well packed, gorgeous bike ! Easy assembly and brief test ride before dark went well. Wt. is 7-8# less than my Scott big Jon which will go up for sale or to a nephew or serve as guest bike. Med fits fine @ 5í10Ē, 29Ē seat height with 1Ē of seatpost left. Also got a spare derailleur hanger while I was at it. Longer ride planned for tomorrow as temps climb out of the teens, only 2Ē snow so for so no test there. Came with 15psi FR, dropped to 8-10 and that felt good on streets. A lot of bike for the money- now gotta get my motor worthy of it.

  29. #29
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    Dude pic showing the lines of the CF, also since Iím new here, itís a chance to check out posting pics. Really like the gloss/flat contrast and no flashy logoís.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Canyon Dude-d6ecc161-15a7-410c-ace8-9b7588bb4805.jpg  


  30. #30
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    I just wish this had been my first fatty.

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