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  1. #1
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    Can tires be inflated over 20psi?

    I'm using Origin8 Supercell. Not sure about the tubes, but they came with my other set of tires, another chinese brand.

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    yes
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  3. #3
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    Great, they feel like they could use a tad more, particularly when cornering.
    How much more, if I may ask? 4, 5 more?

  4. #4
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    Usually it will say somewhere on the tire what the max pressure is. have you looked closely for the little black raised lettering near the tread? My JJ say 30psi.

  5. #5
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    Check both the tires and rims. Some rims are 20psi max, others are 30psi
    '17 Cutthroat
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  6. #6
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    I guess the question I'd ask is why do you need > 20 psi on a fat bike? The spesh rims say 20 psi max, and they are very solid/beefy rims. I use 10-12 psi commuting on the road on my Pugs SS with FBNs on Marge Lites (another solid/beefy rim). If I had a rim that didn't indicate max pressure, I'd stay below 15 psi. I like the cush, even on the road, so maybe it's just me.

  7. #7
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    I'm 275lbs and don't go over 20 ever. Don't think I hit 20 when I air up for pavement

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

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    It's mostly the sound they make when I'm cornering faster/leaning more...

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    I have a Pugsley. I ride all summer long with the tires at 29-30lbs. Less rolling resistance. On Single Track it's btw 10 and 16, in the winter on snow, it's btw 2 to 7 depending on the condition of the snow. Of course, there are different tires for each of these condions (Road, Gravel/Single Track, and Snow).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    I have a Pugsley. I ride all summer long with the tires at 29-30lbs. Less rolling resistance. On Single Track it's btw 10 and 16, in the winter on snow, it's btw 2 to 7 depending on the condition of the snow. Of course, there are different tires for each of these condions (Road, Gravel/Single Track, and Snow).

    yep....this guy is spot on....I run 30psi on pavement with my Captiv8ors no problem...I've found that 24-25psi will give me equally as good rolling resistance, but will take some of the vibrations out of a rough road.

  11. #11
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    Watch the rims. Had clowns at the warehouse assemble a fat bike at shop I hang out at and inflated to normal mtb pressure they're used to, boom! Exploded rim. I was like WTF! Why'd they pump it up so high? Defeats the purpose!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by root View Post
    Watch the rims. Had clowns at the warehouse assemble a fat bike at shop I hang out at and inflated to normal mtb pressure they're used to, boom! Exploded rim. I was like WTF! Why'd they pump it up so high? Defeats the purpose!
    Never thought about this...

  13. #13
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    I pump my tires up to 29 or 30 all the time due to changing tires for different riding (I REALLY need another wheelset... and have never had an issue. You just have to go slow and make sure that the bead seats correctly. I only have the Rolling Daryls for my Pugs, but again, never had an issue. Now if a bikeshop doesn't take the time to read the max pressure and tries to pump up a 4 in tire to 60 or 70 pounds, then it's time to get some popcorn, sit back and watch the show!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slarti View Post
    ...Now if a bikeshop doesn't take the time to read the max pressure and tries to pump up a 4 in tire to 60 or 70 pounds, then it's time to get some popcorn, sit back and watch the show!
    Yeah, right?
    I'm on 100mm rims; there's lots of room in there for a few extra pounds, me thinks...

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    What happened with the exploded rim? Was it carbon? What pressure did they go to?

    I know you can destroy a road carbon clincher by over inflation but you have to work hard and go up to 210+ PSI vs the 120 limit.
    Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2aliE626vc

    On my track pump, anything above 110 has the head blasting off the valve due to the pressure.

  16. #16
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    I don't get it, no reason to inflate a fat tire to those pressures. except when initially seating the tires to the rims. They feel like riding on rocks when the pressure is that high, and they are not actually faster, despite feeling faster. You should not need to go over 20 psi, even on pavement. Why bother riding fat tires if you are going to inflate them that much?

  17. #17
    All fat, all the time.
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    ^^^
    Exactly!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    I don't get it, no reason to inflate a fat tire to those pressures. except when initially seating the tires to the rims. They feel like riding on rocks when the pressure is that high, and they are not actually faster, despite feeling faster. You should not need to go over 20 psi, even on pavement. Why bother riding fat tires if you are going to inflate them that much?
    Let me explain.
    I use my fatty mostly as a commuter, meaning (to the horror of many of you purists, I understand) that my 'needs' are different from yours. I actually started this thread with the (most road-like) tires I am currently using.
    I have never had this 'need' (to inflate at more than 20psi) when I was using the common (dirt) tires that came with the bike; I did have the 'need' to upgrade to a more road-sensible tire, with less roll resistance and (because I like it) with more grip when cornering hard/fast.
    I have my tires inflated at 20 (actually 21 in the front) and I still feel - if anyone has ridden a motorcycle (hard), when cornering with less than ideal pressure on the tires you'll know what I'm talking about - the "twitching" when I'm entering... and there's the obvious sound, although (and this is why I am asking) this is not a "real" road tire, as the surface doesn't really cover the circumference of the part of the tire that has contact with the road...

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    This is what my tires look like - notice how the contact surface is "ripped" when the bike is supposed to be leaning more; this might lead to the rubber 'bending' and making both the noise and the twitching

    Can tires be inflated over 20psi?-91rbqztl-ll._sl1500_.jpg

    This is what I want, but there are only 24 version of this type of tire?!? Do kids go through corners harder/faster than adults?...

    Do you understand now?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flugelbinder View Post
    Let me explain.
    I use my fatty mostly as a commuter, meaning (to the horror of many of you purists, I understand) that my 'needs' are different from yours. I actually started this thread with the (most road-like) tires I am currently using.
    I have never had this 'need' (to inflate at more than 20psi) when I was using the common (dirt) tires that came with the bike; I did have the 'need' to upgrade to a more road-sensible tire, with less roll resistance and (because I like it) with more grip when cornering hard/fast.
    I have my tires inflated at 20 (actually 21 in the front) and I still feel - if anyone has ridden a motorcycle (hard), when cornering with less than ideal pressure on the tires you'll know what I'm talking about - the "twitching" when I'm entering... and there's the obvious sound, although (and this is why I am asking) this is not a "real" road tire, as the surface doesn't really cover the circumference of the part of the tire that has contact with the road...

    This is what my tires look like - notice how the contact surface is "ripped" when the bike is supposed to be leaning more; this might lead to the rubber 'bending' and making both the noise and the twitching

    This is what I want, but there are only 24 version of this type of tire?!? Do kids go through corners harder/faster than adults?...

    Do you understand now?
    Not really. So you want a tire where the tread wraps further around the tire so you can lean it over further into corners? Something like the Hookworm? I don't think adding more pressure to your current tires is going to help that. Looks like your current tires are not ideal for that, they look a little scary is leaned over too far. Vee makes a couple of 26x3.5 tires that I think would be much better.

  20. #20
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    I commute on my Farley 9.6 all week long... and run my pressure at 20-22 psi during the week. Then on the weekend I drop the pressure to about 10-12 psi for dry trail work. I don't like the self-steer that I get below 10 psi, but like the softer ride and better grip that I get around 10. In the winter snow, I'll drop it lower than 10 though.

  21. #21
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    Are we talking about Surly Black Floyd tires now?

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    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

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    How fast are you going around what kind of turns? Trying to envision the speed and the lean angle involved so as not to stray out of your lane while ripping it.

    You may consider a narrower rim to make the tire profile "rounder" vs "flatter".

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    How fast are you going around what kind of turns? .
    FB is used to getting his knee down into corners

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackWare View Post
    FB is used to getting his knee down into corners
    Hehehe... I am, just not on bicycles...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    ...Something like the Hookworm?... Vee makes a couple of 26x3.5 tires that I think would be much better...
    Are you seriously putting a 2.5 on the table?

    The only "road" tires Vee produces are the Speedster and the Chicane (along with a scary, completely slick one) and the Supercell looked - and I still believe it is, read my Amazon review - much better than those offers.

  26. #26
    All fat, all the time.
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    100mm rims aren't helping anything if you are primarily riding hard surfaces.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    100mm rims aren't helping anything if you are primarily riding hard surfaces.
    I am very green to all this, would you mind explaining that statement, or why I would be better served with a different size (I am looking for a new set as we speak, but was looking at another 100mm)...

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackWare View Post
    FB is used to getting his knee down into corners
    as am i..lol
    "ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK"

  29. #29
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    Unless you ride in snow primarily 100mm rims are totally pointless. Hell for road use 80 is a total waste.

    And I'm guessing your one 3.8-4" tires on 100mm rims???

    That's pretty much your entire problem. You don't put 4" tires on a 100mm rim. Does nothing but SUCK. They did this bs on my son's mongoose fat bike I got him for his birthday and I literally emailed then and asked how they could possibly come up with that combo...

    Drop to a 65mm set of rims and let us know how that does for you. Bet you'll find it solves EVERY problem you have. 4" tires should never go on anything bigger than 80mm. 100mm rims are meant for 4.5+ tires and for high flotation over snow and such. Just added wait and total crap ride characteristics in about anything else. I ride my fat bike everywhere from pavement, trails, mud, sand, snow. Right now 3.8 tire rear, 4.7 front. 80mm rims.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    as am i..lol
    Hehehe

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Unless you ride in snow primarily 100mm rims are totally pointless. Hell for road use 80 is a total waste...
    For road use, a fat bike is a total waste period. But if you insist on using a fatbike for road riding, I would go with narrower rims. If you use it mostly for road riding I would consider a 29er wheelset and a tire like the schwalbe big apple, switching to the fat wheels for the occasional off road ride.

    Cheers

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Unless you ride in snow primarily 100mm rims are totally pointless. Hell for road use 80 is a total waste.

    And I'm guessing your one 3.8-4" tires on 100mm rims???

    That's pretty much your entire problem. You don't put 4" tires on a 100mm rim. Does nothing but SUCK. They did this bs on my son's mongoose fat bike I got him for his birthday and I literally emailed then and asked how they could possibly come up with that combo...

    Drop to a 65mm set of rims and let us know how that does for you. Bet you'll find it solves EVERY problem you have. 4" tires should never go on anything bigger than 80mm. 100mm rims are meant for 4.5+ tires and for high flotation over snow and such. Just added wait and total crap ride characteristics in about anything else. I ride my fat bike everywhere from pavement, trails, mud, sand, snow. Right now 3.8 tire rear, 4.7 front. 80mm rims.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    Like I said (many times) I am very green, so this is very useful info that I didn't possess.
    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abelfonseca View Post
    For road use, a fat bike is a total waste period. But if you insist on using a fatbike for road riding, I would go with narrower rims. If you use it mostly for road riding I would consider a 29er wheelset and a tire like the schwalbe big apple, switching to the fat wheels for the occasional off road ride.

    Cheers
    If you say so, except I would never ride anything else (bicycle speaking), other than a fatty... but that's just me.

  34. #34
    All fat, all the time.
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    Riding a fatty all the time is fun(I do it too all summer, but I hate pavement so I avoid), rim width makes a huge difference on firm stuff.

    I went from 82mm to 65mm , the narrower rims handle so much better on dirt.

    Only exception is sand or snow, wider is better for float.
    But if you were already considering different wheels, this is the perfect time. Keep your 100's for the snow. Ride 65's on the road.

    The narrow rim will give the tire a more round profile, better handling all around.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Riding a fatty all the time is fun(I do it too all summer, but I hate pavement so I avoid), rim width makes a huge difference on firm stuff.

    I went from 82mm to 65mm , the narrower rims handle so much better on dirt.

    Only exception is sand or snow, wider is better for float.
    But if you were already considering different wheels, this is the perfect time. Keep your 100's for the snow. Ride 65's on the road.

    The narrow rim will give the tire a more round profile, better handling all around.
    Sounds like a good option...

  36. #36
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    Hell ya fatty all the time is fun!!!! But it's slow on pavement. Unless I'm towing my toddler the fatty stays off the pavement (except today for fit test for new saddle and bars/stem) for the reason of slow and I don't want to bother with tire swaps all the time. Got a road bike for that.

    But not a damn thing wrong it it, fat is Fun doesn't matter where it's ridden. Accept it.

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    I try to ride 4-5 times a week to exercise...80-90% pavement/road. The rest of following the coast line on sand. I keep my tires at 28psi or so and it works great....I don't have a problem with "getting it".

    This is not my only fat bike, just the one I use to exercise on...the other is the one of the fun stuff that doesn't end up on pavement.Can tires be inflated over 20psi?-09-30-2016-gko-sand-picture.jpg

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    My two cents to the OP - if the tires and rims are OK with 20+ psi, go for it. If you want to ride the fattie everywhere, go for it - you bought it.

    If I were to ride on pavement all the time I'd probably keep mine at around 20. However, I ride a combo of pavement (to the trails, plus long distance training) and dirt on the trails. I have to keep the pressure lower (around 10 psi, +/-) because otherwise I get too much tire bounce when going over roots. In the snow I drop the pressures even lower, with larger tires (run 4.0 in non-snow weather, 4.6 inch tires in snow).

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flugelbinder View Post
    Are you seriously putting a 2.5 on the table?

    The only "road" tires Vee produces are the Speedster and the Chicane (along with a scary, completely slick one) and the Supercell looked - and I still believe it is, read my Amazon review - much better than those offers.
    I was not suggesting using the Hookworm, I was just using it as an example of a tire that has the tread going very far down the sidewall like I think you want.

    And yes, I was talking about the Speedster and Chicane. I think the problem with the Supercell is that the thread on the sides is a bit knobby, so when it's leaned way over it's not a smooth ride any more. I hope that makes sense.

    The Black Floyds are actually a good suggestion, I forgot about those. I also agree that if you are on 100mm rims that is contributing to the problem.

  40. #40
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    I'm currently using my FatNotFat 29er wheelset (25mm internal width) with 40c Marathon Cross for road commuting, but when I use my Voodoo Wazoo's default 80mm rims, I run 4.0" Jumbo Jim snakeskins at ~27/30PSI.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
    I'm currently using my FatNotFat 29er wheelset (25mm internal width) with 40c Marathon Cross for road commuting, but when I use my Voodoo Wazoo's default 80mm rims, I run 4.0" Jumbo Jim snakeskins at ~27/30PSI.
    Lower Your Air Pressure!!

    I don't even run my 29x2.2 tires that high!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    Lower Your Air Pressure!!

    I don't even run my 29x2.2 tires that high!
    Why would I want more rolling resistance and wear down my JJs quicker, by running them on tarmac commutes significantly under their maximum rated pressure, when it is not snowy or icy?

    I run them much lower when I go off-road, ~12/13PSI, but I'm one of those odd types that rides my fatbike mostly on commutes. The Marathon Crosses are a bit quicker, but my times both ways are heavily influenced by my luck at the traffic lights, ~1.25-3.5 minutes quicker over ~4.5 miles,

  43. #43
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    Good Lord!! why not fill em with concrete?? I've never had my JJ 4.8's at 10 psi let alone more... Perhaps the harsh ride is good for a road bike but they have rubber bands they claim are tires and every grain of sand is like hitting baby heads.
    Get fAt, Stay fAt, Ride fAt
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
    Why would I want more rolling resistance and wear down my JJs quicker, by running them on tarmac commutes significantly under their maximum rated pressure, when it is not snowy or icy?

    I run them much lower when I go off-road, ~12/13PSI, but I'm one of those odd types that rides my fatbike mostly on commutes. The Marathon Crosses are a bit quicker, but my times both ways are heavily influenced by my luck at the traffic lights, ~1.25-3.5 minutes quicker over ~4.5 miles,
    First of all, you didn't say you were running them on tarmac. Since you have 2 wheelsets I assumed you were using the 29er on tarmac and the fatties off road. So why would you run your JJ on tarmac to begin with when you have a perfectly good 29er wheelset which is perfect for that? And running the pressure lower actually does not increase your rolling resistance and wear down your tires faster, down to a certain point of course. Running the pressure that high will actually wear the center knobs quicker than running lower pressure. And if you are worried about tire wear, why would you run JJ on Tarmac

    And even 12-14 psi sounds high for offroad riding, unless you are north of 250 lbs.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by abelfonseca View Post
    For road use, a fat bike is a total waste period. But if you insist on using a fatbike for road riding, I would go with narrower rims. If you use it mostly for road riding I would consider a 29er wheelset and a tire like the schwalbe big apple, switching to the fat wheels for the occasional off road ride.

    Cheers
    This is generally a dumb conversation that I've tried to steer clear of but.......

    My Fat Bike at 27.5 pounds with 12 psi in the Barbegazzi's is about 10% slower than my Trek 8.4. And at least twice as fun which is why I've put about 2,000 road miles on it since I bought it one year. Mostly due to commuting and partially because I can ride to the single track.

    A "total waste" would not be an accurate description for me and my fat bike on the road.
    "At least I'm enjoying the ride"

    16' Trek 8.4 DS
    16' Farley 7
    and I'm OK admitting..
    16' Sturgis

    Minneapolis MN

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
    I'm currently using my FatNotFat 29er wheelset (25mm internal width) with 40c Marathon Cross for road commuting, but when I use my Voodoo Wazoo's default 80mm rims, I run 4.0" Jumbo Jim snakeskins at ~27/30PSI.
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    First of all, you didn't say you were running them on tarmac. Since you have 2 wheelsets I assumed you were using the 29er on tarmac and the fatties off road. So why would you run your JJ on tarmac to begin with when you have a perfectly good 29er wheelset which is perfect for that? And running the pressure lower actually does not increase your rolling resistance and wear down your tires faster, down to a certain point of course. Running the pressure that high will actually wear the center knobs quicker than running lower pressure. And if you are worried about tire wear, why would you run JJ on Tarmac

    And even 12-14 psi sounds high for offroad riding, unless you are north of 250 lbs.
    I was initially running the default 80mm rimmed wheels with JJs on tarmac because that was all I had until mid summer, when I bought the 29er wheels I swapped over to them, but even now I sometimes swap back for the extra plush ride of the JJs.

    The whole point of running fatbikes with low pressures off-road is to increase the contact patch size and gain extra traction, at the cost of extra rolling resistance. On the tarmac, when I'm against time to get to work and I still have a way to go fitness-wise from how I once was, I need all the extra help I can get from tweaks like high pressure to reduce rolling resistance.
    But the main reason I bought the 29er wheelset was to try and make my JJs last longer and give me access to relatively cheap throw-away tyres in comparison to "bargain" £80 pairs of JJs like I got back at Easter.

    Since my RTA almost three years back, I've rarely dipped much below ~90Kg, but after a summer of moderate eating and attacking my own Strava commuting segment times I'm down to ~80Kg. Next time I get round to going off-road, I might be able to knock down the pressures a bit from when I was ~95Kg all kitted out.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
    I was initially running the default 80mm rimmed wheels with JJs on tarmac because that was all I had until mid summer, when I bought the 29er wheels I swapped over to them, but even now I sometimes swap back for the extra plush ride of the JJs.

    The whole point of running fatbikes with low pressures off-road is to increase the contact patch size and gain extra traction, at the cost of extra rolling resistance. On the tarmac, when I'm against time to get to work and I still have a way to go fitness-wise from how I once was, I need all the extra help I can get from tweaks like high pressure to reduce rolling resistance.
    But the main reason I bought the 29er wheelset was to try and make my JJs last longer and give me access to relatively cheap throw-away tyres in comparison to "bargain" £80 pairs of JJs like I got back at Easter.

    Since my RTA almost three years back, I've rarely dipped much below ~90Kg, but after a summer of moderate eating and attacking my own Strava commuting segment times I'm down to ~80Kg. Next time I get round to going off-road, I might be able to knock down the pressures a bit from when I was ~95Kg all kitted out.
    It's all good. I'm just challenging your assumption that rolling resistance and wear will be higher if you drop the pressure. Dropping the pressure a bit could actually lower your rolling resistance and tire wear. That's what I'm getting at. And it will be more comfortable!

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff_G View Post
    This is generally a dumb conversation that I've tried to steer clear of but.......

    My Fat Bike at 27.5 pounds with 12 psi in the Barbegazzi's is about 10% slower than my Trek 8.4. And at least twice as fun which is why I've put about 2,000 road miles on it since I bought it one year. Mostly due to commuting and partially because I can ride to the single track.

    A "total waste" would not be an accurate description for me and my fat bike on the road.
    simple reason for your scenario is that the Farley 7 is a much better bike than the 8.2 DS...4-5 times the price as well.

    I have a Farley 7 setup with 29x3 for summer, and even like that it's way slower than my road or Cx bike on tarmac.

    If you have 1 bike...then use it everywhere, but if you have options, use the right tool for the job,
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2017 Trek Farley 9.6 with Lauf
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitrousOxide View Post
    Why would I want more rolling resistance and wear down my JJs quicker, by running them on tarmac commutes significantly under their maximum rated pressure, when it is not snowy or icy?

    I run them much lower when I go off-road, ~12/13PSI, but I'm one of those odd types that rides my fatbike mostly on commutes. The Marathon Crosses are a bit quicker, but my times both ways are heavily influenced by my luck at the traffic lights, ~1.25-3.5 minutes quicker over ~4.5 miles,
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff_G View Post
    This is generally a dumb conversation that I've tried to steer clear of but.......

    My Fat Bike at 27.5 pounds with 12 psi in the Barbegazzi's is about 10% slower than my Trek 8.4. And at least twice as fun which is why I've put about 2,000 road miles on it since I bought it one year. Mostly due to commuting and partially because I can ride to the single track.

    A "total waste" would not be an accurate description for me and my fat bike on the road.
    Good to know I'm not alone on this...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff_G View Post
    This is generally a dumb conversation that I've tried to steer clear of but.......

    My Fat Bike at 27.5 pounds with 12 psi in the Barbegazzi's is about 10% slower than my Trek 8.4. And at least twice as fun which is why I've put about 2,000 road miles on it since I bought it one year. Mostly due to commuting and partially because I can ride to the single track.

    A "total waste" would not be an accurate description for me and my fat bike on the road.
    That's definitely an individual case there. I'm faster on my 29er by more than 10% on pavement. My road bike it's same ground covered in half the time. My guess is the fun factor is actually causing your difference between bikes . My fat bike isn't the same but running same tires (guessing same rims too as my wheelset now looks like I came off a Farley except my mulefuts stickers aren't orange). No where near as fast on anything.

    Fat is faster on some trial segments but over 29er is 10-15% faster on a normal day. Pavement my fat bike is slowest. But my fat bike I have to say brings in the BIGGEST smiles.

    So who the heck cares what people think. It's about the fun. Don't live life to please others, they have a problem, we were taught the middle finger for a reason. It doesn't effect them in any way. Do it and enjoy yourself. Life's too short.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    That's definitely an individual case there. I'm faster on my 29er by more than 10% on pavement. My road bike it's same ground covered in half the time. My guess is the fun factor is actually causing your difference between bikes . My fat bike isn't the same but running same tires (guessing same rims too as my wheelset now looks like I came off a Farley except my mulefuts stickers aren't orange). No where near as fast on anything.

    Fat is faster on some trial segments but over 29er is 10-15% faster on a normal day. Pavement my fat bike is slowest. But my fat bike I have to say brings in the BIGGEST smiles.

    So who the heck cares what people think. It's about the fun. Don't live life to please others, they have a problem, we were taught the middle finger for a reason. It doesn't effect them in any way. Do it and enjoy yourself. Life's too short.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    People get by me all the time... do I care if I am slower than them?

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    i need 20 to hold my butt up

  53. #53
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    Give this a listen, KBS talks a lot but makes a lot of sense.

    https://fat-bike.com/2016/06/fat-cam...-other-things/
    Keep the Rubber Side Down

  54. #54
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    Check out CyclingTips Podcast and listen to the episode "Where the Rubber Meets the Road"....interesting discussion on tire pressure as well.

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    So the last week I've been playing with pressures on my exercise bike which has 120tpi Captiv8ors on 80mm wheels that I typically run at 30psi front/back. I let a little air out on each ride but stopped at 25 psi on the rear (to not dramatically increase the resistance). On the front I dropped it 4-5 psi per ride and got all the way down to 9psi which I did 15 miles of this morning. Resistance was considerably higher and the road chatter was pretty much gone BUT there was too much self steer for me to leave it at that pressure. I sometimes like to sit straight up while pedaling to loosen up/shake out my shoulders/elbows/wrists but am unable to do that under 15 psi...

  56. #56
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    If you don't have one, the first thing you should do is get a good, low-pressure tire gauge. What kind of gauge are you using to test the pressure? When I first got a fat bike I was using the gauge on my pump that goes up to 200. I was pumping up to an indicated 20 before I felt good on pavement. I couldn't understand how anyone was riding at 7-10 PSI. I finally got a 1-30 PSI Accu-Gage and discovered that my pump did not read correctly at low values. My indicated 20 was actually 10 PSI.

  57. #57
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    First ride today on my new supercells...I Hate losing the look of the 4.8 xl's but since i'm mostly on road it is nice and quiet and easier to go.

    the one thing I have to get used to is that it wants to steer away when turned a bit from going straight. it may be pressure related. I will try dif pressures and see.

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