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  1. #1
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    Camera for Fat Biking?

    I'm just curious on the setup that you guys use.

    Being new to the scene it seems like fat biking and photography goes 1 on 1 with each other.

    It just happens that photography is my main hobby. I currently shoot a Nikon D500 with a 70-200VRII, Nikon 17-55 2.8, and other lens as my main set up. So yes it's a very heavy setup. I use a Lowpro Flipside 300 camera bag so it's well protected but I still worry that is I take a spill there will be damage. I get that I can take it easy but on snow/ice it's going to happen.

    I used my cellphone yesterday but going from a dslr to a cell is just meh lol.

    I'm thinking of a quality small P&S. On the lines of a Sony R100 or one of Canons 1" sensored P&S.

    cell shots here
    Camera for Fat Biking?-20180209_162528.jpg
    Camera for Fat Biking?-20180209_162323-1-.jpg
    Last edited by Tyr-Sog; 02-10-2018 at 09:38 AM.
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  2. #2
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    I use a Ricoh GR (APS-C sensor, fixed 28mm-e lens). Previous camera was the first version of the Sony RX100, which is a great little camera as well though the Ricoh is a step up in image quality.

    Camera for Fat Biking?-1166639d1510274626-daily-fatbike-pic-thread-gr001-3607_wozo-pond-1024.jpg

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I thought about the Ricoh or a used Nikon Coolpix A for it's APS-C sized sensor but I'm just worried about the fix lens being limiting at times.

    I know Canon just released a new APS-C sized PowerShot G1 X Mark III but at $1300 it's a pretty big risk. I'm not sure on it's size either. It may be pretty big.

    I've also seen the full-framed Sony RX1 going used for under $1000 now which I'm highly interested in. The IQ is amazing but again it has the big front lens so there's a risk and it's fixed. Plus is it much smaller than Sonys FF mirroless cameras? I don't know.
    Last edited by Tyr-Sog; 02-10-2018 at 07:01 AM.
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  4. #4
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I mount a go-pro to the handlebars using the metal mounts you can buy on ebay, and then set it to take pictures ever 30 seconds or minute or so, usually get some fantastic shots.Camera for Fat Biking?-44.jpgCamera for Fat Biking?-17155529_10101067929687538_6748835983280998884_n.jpgCamera for Fat Biking?-17016926_10101068095490268_2277070258528518523_o.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
    aka bOb
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    Interesting thread, I have plus bike cameras dialed but struggle with fat bike cameras.

    I would think some good info could be found or discussed here Photography for mountain bikers - Mtbr.com but probably not fat bike specific.

  6. #6
    FB&H rider
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    What bdundee said - lots of good info there.
    Also, I'd suggest using a frame bag rather than the backpack - a camera will be better protected by the frame in a spill than on your back (properly stowed).
    2016 Trek Farley 5 "Farley"
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  7. #7
    All fat, all the time.
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    Wide angle lens that is fat bike compatible is very important

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Interesting thread, I have plus bike cameras dialed but struggle with fat bike cameras.

    I would think some good info could be found or discussed here Photography for mountain bikers - Mtbr.com but probably not fat bike specific.
    I, too, struggle with fat bike specific cameras. All that rubber is really hard on lenses.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr-Sog View Post
    I've also seen the full-framed Sony RX1 going used for under $1000 now which I'm highly interested in. The IQ is amazing but again it has the big front lens so there's a risk and it's fixed. Plus is it much smaller than Sonys FF mirroless cameras? I don't know.
    I have a RX1. Image quality wise it's perfect but it has its shortcomings, slow AF, the size of the lens, no remote release possibility and the fixed 35mm lens is not for everyone.

    I have cameras of all sizes but sadly I only take my phone (and it's not even a good "camera phone") or a Sony action cam on my rides.

    I will add a compact eventually, still not sure which one. The Panasonic LX15 (LX10) is nice and "more a camera" that the Sony RX100 but missing a viewfinder is an issue outdoor...

  10. #10
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    Canon Powershot G1X Mark II, that I often put in a custom made camera bag I had made for me by Jason Snell from Barking Bear Bagworks in Michigan. I also use a couple of Go Pros.

  11. #11
    i don't give a shift
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    These days, I shoot all my photos with a GoPro Hero 5 Session. Some recent shots:

    Camera for Fat Biking?-powder.jpg Camera for Fat Biking?-slope.jpg

    Camera for Fat Biking?-forest.jpg Camera for Fat Biking?-chasseral.jpg
    blogging @29in.CH

  12. #12
    Anchorage, AK
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    I would recommend getting a camera that takes aa batteries. That way you can use the same type of batteries in your camera, head lamp, and gps.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    --Peace

  13. #13
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    Contrary to the snarky posters, I think the needs for winter fatbiking camera are indeed different than other bikes.

    A phone camera is far too cold sensitive and lacks quality.

    My favorite summer biking camera is a high end point and shoot, the Canon S110. It does a little better with the cold but as I found out yesterday is very sensitive to condensation. I kept it in warm in a pocket, and it fogged up inside the lens immediately when exposed to 10 degree temps.

    Probably the best camera would be a quality double A powered waterproof point and shoot.

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teton29er View Post
    Contrary to the snarky posters, I think the needs for winter fatbiking camera are indeed different than other bikes.

    A phone camera is far too cold sensitive and lacks quality.

    My favorite summer biking camera is a high end point and shoot, the Canon S110. It does a little better with the cold but as I found out yesterday is very sensitive to condensation. I kept it in warm in a pocket, and it fogged up inside the lens immediately when exposed to 10 degree temps.

    Probably the best camera would be a quality double A powered waterproof point and shoot.
    It depends on how far you want to go, with quality and everything else. I know someone that packs a DSLR sometimes, takes some pretty good pics, but most of his pics are no better than you can get with a good phone these days. I'm not saying you can't do better, but is it worth it? I thought I was going to be smart on this last ride to the glacier a few days ago and pack my go-pro with a few boot-heater pads and wrap it in insulation to keep it warm on it's mount, but that cause condensation in the case and while it stayed nice and warm, the pictures got fuzzy and I only realized it towards the end of the ride, when I cleared the condensation out. My phone pictures on the other hand turned out beautiful. I usually run the go-pro without insulation and it does ok with the extended battery pack, but still shuts off early.

    I almost think a mechanical camera is the best for the cold...

    Camera for Fat Biking?-img_4583s.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  15. #15
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    If you're used to DSLR quality then p&s stuff just doesn't cut it. Especially in low contrast light like the 2 shots you posted.

    I carry my DSLR on most rides. Sometimes with a 28-200, other times with a 14mm prime. Just depends on the day, the light, the pace.

    I use one of these. It's a crappy pack, except for the ability to use the camera without removing the pack. And for that feature alone it is priceless.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Camera for Fat Biking?-8a3a4137.jpg  

    Camera for Fat Biking?-8a3a5167.jpg  


  16. #16
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    I tried to take two similar pictures.

    Sony RX1
    Camera for Fat Biking?-p-f.ch_180213_1509_08931_rx1.jpg


    Action Cam Sony FDR-X3000
    Camera for Fat Biking?-p-f.ch_180213_1607_00013_x3.jpg

  17. #17
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    I would just try to find a nice fat bike specific camera and then take a lot of picture of your bike, trees, maybe a bridge or something, stuff that everybody who follows you on instagram or facebook also fat bikes by regularly.
    it's a challenge some of us are ultimately worthy of.

  18. #18
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    My standard camera nowadays is a Leica M-D. It fits with iPad Pro, two lenses, and my other photographic essentials into a Peak Design Sling 5L:



    The Sling 5L is great for bicycling: It nestles snugly into the lower middle of my back and doesn't move around at all as I ride, it's easy to swing around to my chest and access the contents too. Nicely made, nicely padded, small and light even with all that gear in it.

    Lately, however, I've been carrying a Light L16 (see http://light.co for pictures and details). It's about half the weight of the Leica and about the size of the Leica body only, yet gives me more choices (28-150mm focal length settings, lots of post processing options). Fitted into the same Sling 5L, it leaves a lot of room to spare. The only downside of using the L16 is that its software is really pretty young so far and it takes some work to get the results I want out of it. But it does produce the results, so I don't mind.

    My other camera for cycling I'm just getting up to speed on.. It's a Rylo 360° action cam. Very interesting to work with because you basically just have to work out a couple of mounting points to use to hold it and point it roughly where you want it to be looking, and then just ride. All the magic happens in the video editing after the fact. I'm still waiting on a couple of mounts to make it work for my fat bike and my motorcycle, but I think there's a huge lot of stuff to be had out of it!

    G

  19. #19
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    Todays photography is 50% photo and 50% Post.

    A larger sensor camera open the doors to better DR, shadow/highlight recovery, color, less noise, retaining detail for larger prints, less DOF, etc, etc.

    I personally shoot RAW nearly all the time just so I have complete control over my photo. Even when shooting the crop sensored Nikon D500 I miss the flexibility of a Full-frame camera in this sense.

    I might look at the FF Sony mirrorless line with a prime or two. I've just read horror stories about Sony and cold all though the bike will be used all year.

    I do like the idea of having a mounted camera taking photos at intervals. That's neat!
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by eFat View Post
    I tried to take two similar pictures.

    Sony RX1
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Action Cam Sony FDR-X3000
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looks like less DOF on the RX1
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr-Sog View Post
    Todays photography is 50% photo and 50% Post.

    A larger sensor camera open the doors to better DR, shadow/highlight recovery, color, less noise, retaining detail for larger prints, less DOF, etc, etc.

    I personally shoot RAW nearly all the time just so I have complete control over my photo. Even when shooting the crop sensored Nikon D500 I miss the flexibility of a Full-frame camera in this sense.

    I might look at the FF Sony mirrorless line with a prime or two. I've just read horror stories about Sony and cold all though the bike will be used all year.

    I do like the idea of having a mounted camera taking photos at intervals. That's neat!
    Both the Light L16 and the Rylo 360 are computational photography ... it's more like 75% image processing work for either of them. The Light utilizes sixteen cameras with 28, 70, and 150 mm FoV equivalents, picks up to ten of them to make the exposure that you have specified, and then the post-processing software integrates all those exposures into a single frame while letting you choose the DoF zone and make other adjustments. Its output ranges from 16 to 80 MPixel depending upon the circumstances and taking environment.

    The Rylo is a pair of fish-eye lenses, back to back, capturing a full 360° spherical clip. It allows you to process a given capture clip in a huge variety of ways, telling it what to point at as the clip flows along, what focal length to use, whether to target a point or track a moving subject, levels horizons, implements image stabilization, etc, in post. It's pretty awesome for something essentially the size of my thumb.

    These are both bleeding edge photographic/video video devices. My Leica M-D is for my traditional workflow and classic photographic efforts. FF sensor, 24 Pixel... It only captures raw files, has no options other than focus, aperture, shutter time, ISO, and whether you want sequence, single, or self timer operation. A very simple camera. All of the magic comes from what I see, how I set the exposure, and how I render the results.

    I like to keep things interesting...

    G


    Shimmer – Cork, Ireland 2017
    Leica M-D + Summicron-M 50mm f/2

  22. #22
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    I use a Sony NEX-6, and carry it in a Lowe case attached to the stem and handlebar:

    Cockpit

    It works fine in the cold, if I keep the battery warm. I did a bike trip last week were I took a few photos at -40 and the camera worked fine, with a bit of battery juggling. Generally I keep on on the back of my bike gloves or in my mitten, and the other in the camera, and swap back and forth as the one in the camera stops working.

    I have also used the Olympus PEN style mirror less cameras in the past, and those have worked well too, I just switched to the NEX as it was pretty cheap and had a view finder.

    Happy photo taking!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr-Sog View Post
    Looks like less DOF on the RX1
    The difference is of course massive.

    And here the RX1 is limited by the brightness of the scene. At f/2 the minimum shutter speed is 1/2000 so here I had to close to f/4. Or use a ND filter.

    The perpective is way different too. with the RX1 35mm lens I was at about 5m of the bike. With the action cam it was more like 50-70cm.

  24. #24
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    Hi everyone, my bike camera is a Sony NEX 5 that I brought years ago. I normally use the E mount 20mm pancake lens or the E mount 50mm.

    Makes for a very small kit and I just picked up an Ortlieb Hip Pack Two bag to carry it and not have to worry about and rain.

    Camera for Fat Biking?-img_2261.jpg

    Camera for Fat Biking?-dsc09345.jpg

    OZ.

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