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  1. #1
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    Breaking the seal on tubeless ready rims.

    Breaking the seal on tubeless ready rims.-20151124_210948_resized.jpgBreaking the seal on tubeless ready rims.-20151124_211819_resized.jpg
    Finally had success with breaking the seal on the Mulefuts. Have tried several methods with lots of aggravation. This one came to me tonight after trying several others.

    I didn't even break a sweat to break the seal. Smooth as slicks on ice.

    Step 1. Inflate tire to 12 to 15 psi.

    Step 2. Use metal C-clamps just above the rim about 5 to 6" apart. Start closing the C-clamps in equal increments till the bead lock opens up.

    Step 3. Use tire lever to complete the breaking of the seal.

    Step 4. Carefully pour out the Stans into a container. (Saved most of the stans in the tire)

    Interesting part of this was even when the bead lock was broken, the tire was still holding air.

    As a side note, I have used the stretch wrap method of tubeless. When I removed the stretch wrap, not a single drop of stans had migrated to the rim strip indicating that it works just as well as any tape method. If interested in stretch wrap you can find the process here.

    Tubeless With Stretch Wrap by Bumpyride69 | Photobucket
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Breaking the seal on tubeless ready rims.-20151124_210858_resized.jpg  

    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  2. #2
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    Or just lay the wheel on it's side, slap on a pair of shoes/boots with a nice firm sole. Get your heel right up to the edge of the rim, and jam your weight downward.

    Worked every time with my LB's, but yes, they are surprisingly tenacious, it's true!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Or just lay the wheel on it's side, slap on a pair of shoes/boots with a nice firm sole. Get your heel right up to the edge of the rim, and jam your weight downward.

    Worked every time with my LB's, but yes, they are surprisingly tenacious, it's true!
    I do something very similar.

    1. place the tire on a step with the rim barely hanging off the edge of the step.
    2. Put one foot on the tire on the step, and push down on the rim with the other foot.

    Has worked with four different tires on mulefuts.

  4. #4
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    I weigh 138 lbs.. Tried several methods including stepping on the tire with both methods listed above. Can't generate enough force, though Thanksgiving is tomorrow and perhaps I can eat enough to gain the weight necessary.

    There are a bunch of us on fatbikes that really don't weigh all that much, or perhaps don't have the skill necessary to effect other methods to break the bead. This was meant to be a help for anyone who has tried the previously mentioned methods without success. I estimate that if you can lift your bike, you can break the bead without breaking a sweat. You can also do this on a bike stand without doing any damage to the rim/cassette/rotors. The second tire I did (not including time to put the bike on a stand nor pumping up to 12 to 15 lbs) took me 1 1/2 minutes to break the seal.
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bumpyride View Post
    I weigh 138 lbs.. Tried several methods including stepping on the tire with both methods listed above. Can't generate enough force, though Thanksgiving is tomorrow and perhaps I can eat enough to gain the weight necessary.
    I weigh 145 lbs and had good luck with the method I presented. It is entirely possible that your tires fit tighter. I think your C clamp method sounds reasonable.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by blizzard_mk View Post
    I weigh 145 lbs and had good luck with the method I presented. It is entirely possible that your tires fit tighter. I think your C clamp method sounds reasonable.
    My Floaters came of easily, and the step method worked on those. The Mission Commands did not, even immediately after putting them on the Mulefuts without Stans.
    Decided to try something else with a better mechanical advantage to do the work for me for the 2nd run at removing the tires.

    Calculate the mechanical advantage of the screw by dividing the circumference of the screw by the pitch of the screw. Using the previous examples, a screw with a pitch of 1/8 and a circumference of 0.79 inches would produce a mechanical advantage of 6.3 (0.79 inches/ 0.125 = 6.3).


    It was necessary to keep the tires inflated in order for them not to fold around the C-clamps and to use 2 C-clamps which spread the bead wider.

    I'm a builder, and have found that mechanical advantage saves me much grief. I can lift a 500 lb. beam in place by myself using leverage. Can't budge it just trying to pick it up.
    Last edited by Bumpyride; 11-25-2015 at 07:09 AM. Reason: Redundant
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  7. #7
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    I know when I set up my LB rims I spent about half a day trying to break the bead from the tires I had set up with a tube the day before to set the rim strip. I tried all kinds of hard and soft boots until I put my SPD boots on and the bead popped relatively easy. I felt stupid for working so hard before. No matter what, it's good you found an easy method.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    I think it's genius. Or resourceful at least. If you put a short piece of a 1x board or something similar, you might be able to break the bead with a single C-clamp. And it may be a little easier on the tire sidewall too since it'll spread the pressure out over a broader area.

    In any case, thanks for sharing your solution
    There is a season, turn, turn, turn
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  9. #9
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    Great solution, Thx for posting. I had to go bare foot to get a toe grip on the tire to get it off the mulefut.

    Can only imagine how much fun I would have if i had a flat and had to remove the tire this way on a remote, cold, deep snow ride. Now I can carry a c-clamp with me I see a market for titanium or carbon c-clamps!!!

    The foot method also excerts s lot of lateral force on the wheel that might have some negative affects on trueness, etc. This method eliminates that.

    Urmb

  10. #10
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    I was in a local shop that was trying to change out a tube on a bike of theirs they were building for stock, that came with a flat tube out of the box. It was the first tire change they had done on a Mulefut rim and they were having an awful time of it. Called Salsa twice (I think the bike was a 2016 Mukluk) for tips and they were still fighting with it.

    I left after doing my own business there, thinking to myself that I was glad that wasn't me building that bike and fighting with that tire. In a way, though, that tenacious bead lock does mean for a more reliable tubeless setup, so it's not all bad.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AthleticAL View Post
    I think it's genius. Or resourceful at least. If you put a short piece of a 1x board or something similar, you might be able to break the bead with a single C-clamp. And it may be a little easier on the tire sidewall too since it'll spread the pressure out over a broader area.

    In any case, thanks for sharing your solution
    This is my thought as well. I would not put a C-clamp on without a block to spread the point load out a bit. Actually i would not use a C-clamp at all since standing on it works well for me (different rims though).

    urmb, the standing method does not exert a lot of lateral force on the rim. Very little, actually, as your weight is on the tire if you're doing it right.

  12. #12
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    What's the best seatpost bag for carrying c-clamps on a ride?

    Not trying to be smarmy, because your solution gets full points for creativity and using what you have on hand. Just pointing out that eventually you'll need to do this on the trail, and c-clamps are often hard to find out there. At least on my backyard trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    What's the best seatpost bag for carrying c-clamps on a ride?

    Not trying to be smarmy, because your solution gets full points for creativity and using what you have on hand. Just pointing out that eventually you'll need to do this on the trail, and c-clamps are often hard to find out there. At least on my backyard trails.
    ..and this C-clamp method relies on there being some air pressure in the tire.

  14. #14
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    I can remove, and install on both my Mulefuts by foot and hand. I really don't know where all this aggravation is coming from, did they update the bead to be even stronger? Maybe the first run of Mulefuts is different?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by l3eaudacious View Post
    I can remove, and install on both my Mulefuts by foot and hand. I really don't know where all this aggravation is coming from, did they update the bead to be even stronger? Maybe the first run of Mulefuts is different?
    good question. all I know is that at a shop that does a good bit of fatbike business, the employee was having a problem with stepping on the tire to remove it from the rim. He put a 2x4 underneath the rim to prop it up a little and get more room to press down and the tire was holding firm. I left before he got it off the rim.

    I also know that quite a few people have had trouble with Nexties. I have always been able to pry my tires off of the Nexties by hand. I usually have to work at it, and I'd hate to have to do that in the cold woods in January. My first thoughts watching the employee fight with those tires/rims were that I wouldn't want to have that much trouble with them when trying to fix a flat in the woods, which goes back to what mikesee said.

  16. #16
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    10. “May I say that I have not thoroughly enjoyed serving with humans? I find their illogic and foolish emotions a constant irritant.” - Star Trek, season 3, episode 7 (“Day of the Dove,” 1968) Spock quotes.

    This is a shop fix. I certainly didn't think anyone would be carrying the paraphernalia on their bike. There are times when folks would like to do maintenance themselves, but their physicality limits what they can do. This is just another way to use mechanical advantage to solve a problem. When your changing over to winter/summer tires this would be appropriate. The trail is another matter. You need to choose your tires wisely, especially in the winter time. I had a heck of a time breaking the bead on the trail in the summer with a Floater, but did manage. I just installed a pair of Nates. I put those on by hand without levers, and have broken the bead by standing on them. This is partially determining what tires I will use in the winter. I want a tire I can slip a tube in on the trail without losing my fingers to frostbite.

    I would urge anyone that is going on a long primitive ride (especially in winter), to become well acquainted with slipping in/changing a tube for their particular tire, and whether or not it is feasible.

    Generalizations in certain situations can be way off base, so if you expect someone to be as good as you, you're probably in for a bit of a surprise. YMMV depending how much you weigh, how strong you are, your technique, the rims you run and (importantly) which tires you use.

    Different tires are just that--different tires. If all I rode was Nates year round, I wouldn't worry about it because they are running loose (for me). The Mission Commands are a different story. Can't do it. From what I've heard Snowshoes are not particularly easy to break the bead lock.

    My Nates are on for the winter.
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  17. #17
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    I spend couple hours yesterday trying to remove the Vee Snowshoe off these Mulefuts with no luck. Perhaps being 160lb is just not enough weight. I was so aggravated and mad I was about to take knife to them and cut them off. I never ever had so much trouble getting a tire off a rim. Yes, a nice seal is all good for tubeless but this is beyond ridicules. There is absolutely no way in hell one gets a tire off on the trail. There is no other way but to run these rims tubeless as you are not changing a tube on trail.

    Luckily another thread pointed me at this one and the c-clamp method finally did it. It took a few trails with varies air pressures. I tried putting two wood boards between the tire and the clamps but after one of the boards shot up in the air next to my head I decided its not a good idea. I really worried I will damage the tire but at this point I no longer cared. Even with clamps I had to use two screw drivers to pray the seal enough to fit a tire lever in. Then with 3 levers it took quite a bit of work to finally pray one side off the rim. My hands are scratched up and I can't feel my fingers.

    I plan on putting on Snowshoe XL with studs and hopefully these are stretched a bit (second season) and will not be so tight. I also tend to change my tires with Vee H-Billie depending on the trail conditions and if I have same trouble with these two tires then no way I can keep these rims. Only option would be to get a second set of rims (cassette, rotors) and maybe use them with the other set of tires. Well I guess I can move the cassette and rotors between the wheel sets as well...

    I was very excited to get a new fat bike with these rims but now I don't think it was such a good idea.

  18. #18
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    Maybe there's money in LBS classes; How to change a FatTire with tight beads? Sounds like a porno.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    I spend couple hours yesterday trying to remove the Vee Snowshoe off these Mulefuts with no luck. Perhaps being 160lb is just not enough weight. I was so aggravated and mad I was about to take knife to them and cut them off. I never ever had so much trouble getting a tire off a rim. Yes, a nice seal is all good for tubeless but this is beyond ridicules. There is absolutely no way in hell one gets a tire off on the trail. There is no other way but to run these rims tubeless as you are not changing a tube on trail.

    Luckily another thread pointed me at this one and the c-clamp method finally did it. It took a few trails with varies air pressures. I tried putting two wood boards between the tire and the clamps but after one of the boards shot up in the air next to my head I decided its not a good idea. I really worried I will damage the tire but at this point I no longer cared. Even with clamps I had to use two screw drivers to pray the seal enough to fit a tire lever in. Then with 3 levers it took quite a bit of work to finally pray one side off the rim. My hands are scratched up and I can't feel my fingers.

    I plan on putting on Snowshoe XL with studs and hopefully these are stretched a bit (second season) and will not be so tight. I also tend to change my tires with Vee H-Billie depending on the trail conditions and if I have same trouble with these two tires then no way I can keep these rims. Only option would be to get a second set of rims (cassette, rotors) and maybe use them with the other set of tires. Well I guess I can move the cassette and rotors between the wheel sets as well...

    I was very excited to get a new fat bike with these rims but now I don't think it was such a good idea.
    The C-clamps I used were pretty large with large pads and spaced them about 6 inches apart. No damage to the casings. The tire pressure was crucial to making sure that only the area around the C-clamps was pulled away from the tubeless bead, and then the tire lever pretty much freed the rest of the rim. Soap and water helps.

    Glad you were able to get the tires off without destroying them. I saw your post and was hoping that you didn't have to cut the tires. Different tires have slightly different circumferences and different bead locks. Seems like the Surly tires are a little looser, easier to break the bead lock. Happy snowshoeing.
    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by l3eaudacious View Post
    Maybe there's money in LBS classes; How to change a FatTire with tight beads? Sounds like a porno.
    lol that was good

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bumpyride View Post
    The C-clamps I used were pretty large with large pads and spaced them about 6 inches apart. No damage to the casings. The tire pressure was crucial to making sure that only the area around the C-clamps was pulled away from the tubeless bead, and then the tire lever pretty much freed the rest of the rim. Soap and water helps.

    Glad you were able to get the tires off without destroying them. I saw your post and was hoping that you didn't have to cut the tires. Different tires have slightly different circumferences and different bead locks. Seems like the Surly tires are a little looser, easier to break the bead lock. Happy snowshoeing.
    My clamps also have large plastic covered pads and looks like no damage to the tire. I was not able to get the tire lever in but had to use two screw drivers. Was worried I would damage the rim or tires but worked out ok. Once I pulled the bead out I was able to push in the tire lever and go from there. What a major pain. Thanks for your post and the details, really helped me to get this tire off. I did inject some soapy water with a syringe in to the edge there but not sure if it helped at all.

  22. #22
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    I also have the Park Tool TL-1 levers and they are not that good for this. I might gt maybe something like this

    BikeMaster Three Piece Tire Iron Set | 246-266 | J&P Cycles

    and this looks interesting

    J&P Cycles® Tire Bead Breaker

    J&P Cycles® Tire Bead Breaker | 2170080 | J&P Cycles

    also just found this video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qaom3dHtVNU

  23. #23
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    here are the instructions for the Bead Barker

    http://img.jpcycles.com/staticwebfil...df/2170080.pdf

  24. #24
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    It's really hard to believe that a tire could be so stuck to a rim that it would require such heroics. I've been working on cars, bikes, cycles for decades and your struggle is unique. Personally, I'd love to have a tire so stuck, it would allow super low tire pressure.

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    Dash Pt. State Park (Tacoma), Big Sky Montana during Snowboard Season, Duluth Mn, a couple of times of year incl. Xmas.

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    Here is a tool that I think would work very well. Its for motorcycle tires and the long handles gives plenty of leverage and are much more convenient then the screw based ones. Although the screw based ones would be more "convenient" to take along on the trail

    Motocentric Bead Breaker Motorcycle Tire Accessories | eBay

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    It's really hard to believe that a tire could be so stuck to a rim that it would require such heroics. I've been working on cars, bikes, cycles for decades and your struggle is unique. Personally, I'd love to have a tire so stuck, it would allow super low tire pressure.
    I'm with Ben on this one.

  28. #28
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    ive had best luck laying the wheel on some 2x4 pieces of wood to protect cassette/hub/rotor and put another longer 2x4 on the bead and then step on it. the leverage pops it off like a champ each time. if you are in the woods and need to put a tube in.... goodluck?!?! its truly a beast to get off the rim!
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    I went ahead and ordered that Motocentric Bead Breaker tool. As for the trails, I think best is to go tubeless and not to worry about removing the tire in the field.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by dariusf View Post
    As for the trails, I think best is to go tubeless and not to worry about removing the tire in the field.
    Tubeless is great, but what if you tear a sidewall and need to put in a tube to get home? It's one thing to use tools, 2x4s, or trash cans (my favorite) to unseat the bead, but how do we do it trailside? While it's nice not to worry, it's important to know how to deal with the "what ifs".
    Jason
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    Tubeless is great, but what if you tear a sidewall and need to put in a tube to get home? It's one thing to use tools, 2x4s, or trash cans (my favorite) to unseat the bead, but how do we do it trailside? While it's nice not to worry, it's important to know how to deal with the "what ifs".
    Once the tire has been on there for a little while, it's FAR easier to remove and reset. It's that initial set that was a PITA, before the tire was stretched. Putting my studded 5" tire on this winter was a breeze, compared to last year.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    Tubeless is great, but what if you tear a sidewall and need to put in a tube to get home? It's one thing to use tools, 2x4s, or trash cans (my favorite) to unseat the bead, but how do we do it trailside? While it's nice not to worry, it's important to know how to deal with the "what ifs".
    I'm not sure if I can describe this well but I've had good luck with this method on my Mule Futs. I sit down and anchors my left palm on the outside of the rim. I then place my left elbow up against my left thigh. I then use my right palm and all my body weight against the right side of the tire. I push until I see the bead move then I rotate two or three inches and apply pressure again. On about the third or fourth rotation the head will pop as long as I notice some movement at each push. Oh and make sure you do your Lamaze breathing during each push!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHowley2003 View Post
    I'm not sure if I can describe this well but I've had good luck with this method on my Mule Futs. I sit down and anchors my left palm on the outside of the rim. I then place my left elbow up against my left thigh. I then use my right palm and all my body weight against the right side of the tire. I push until I see the bead move then I rotate two or three inches and apply pressure again. On about the third or fourth rotation the head will pop as long as I notice some movement at each push. Oh and make sure you do your Lamaze breathing during each push!
    Also plenty of cursing helps

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    The tool has finally arrived. Looks very solid and while I have not tested it yet, it looks like it will do the job and make the whole tire changing much simpler, hopefully

    Breaking the seal on tubeless ready rims.-20151130_155927_resized.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    It's really hard to believe that a tire could be so stuck to a rim that it would require such heroics. I've been working on cars, bikes, cycles for decades and your struggle is unique. Personally, I'd love to have a tire so stuck, it would allow super low tire pressure.
    Believe it.

    I've done a number of tubeless setups including one Mulefut. That was with a Van Helga and I had to do the boot-step on the bead to break the bead, but overall no problem.

    I offered to convert a friend's MF with 2016 Snowshoe to tubeless. Breaking the bead required boards, C-clamps, and cursing. Even with C-clamps, one bead would break but the other wouldn't and more wresting was required. Getting the tire off was another challenge.

    I'm sure that the bead will loosen with time, but as you've said, as they are when new, the tires ain't coming off, even when flat, without some heroics or tricks. If you have tricks from the motorcycle world for breaking the bead, I for one would like to learn rather than struggle.

    I'd say the tubeless setup has evolved and we have our wishes granted for a good tire bead / bead seat interface. But it may now mean just like moto and car tires, we'll need bead breaker tools (or other inventive measures)

    And lastly - on the Mulefuts - as others have noted: There are holes in the beadseat from the manufacturing process and a seam / joint that is not welded. If these aren't covered with tape or other means (I use latex caulk before tape) then an airtight seal is much more difficult if not impossible.

  36. #36
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    If you can climb a hill you can take a tire off. You dont "step" like a little ***** foot, you stomp. 120 tpi tires need a bit of air in them my 60tpi hodags dont. I put the wheel on blocks and stomp stepping even over 200 lbs does nothing
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

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    Quote Originally Posted by solarplex View Post
    If you can climb a hill you can take a tire off. You dont "step" like a little ***** foot, you stomp. 120 tpi tires need a bit of air in them my 60tpi hodags dont. I put the wheel on blocks and stomp stepping even over 200 lbs does nothing
    I'll try it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldens Lowe View Post
    I'll try it!
    Thanks all for this great advice. I just got a Sturgis bullet and wanted to mount my surly Nates from a previous bike. I could not believe how difficult it was to get the Vee snow shoes off the mule fut! i've worked on thousands of tires and done dozens of tubeless conversions but never seen anything like this. I was minutes from cutting the tire off when I did a quick search and found your thread.

    I tried stairs and boots, 2x4s and leverage. Nothing would break it. In the end I used a vice and 2 C-clamps to get enough space in the bead to insert an old metal tire lever. It was then patience and swearing to work the bead off. My Nates went on with no problem and fit great!

    I will never use these Vee tires and plan to give them away. What a nightmare!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbone627 View Post
    Thanks all for this great advice. I just got a Sturgis bullet and wanted to mount my surly Nates from a previous bike. I could not believe how difficult it was to get the Vee snow shoes off the mule fut! i've worked on thousands of tires and done dozens of tubeless conversions but never seen anything like this. I was minutes from cutting the tire off when I did a quick search and found your thread.

    I tried stairs and boots, 2x4s and leverage. Nothing would break it. In the end I used a vice and 2 C-clamps to get enough space in the bead to insert an old metal tire lever. It was then patience and swearing to work the bead off. My Nates went on with no problem and fit great!

    I will never use these Vee tires and plan to give them away. What a nightmare!
    I don't think its specifically the Vee tires but the combination of new tires on these rims. I remember having very hard time getting some new Neo-Moto 650b tires on WTB i23 rims and then off again after a few rides. Once the tires stretched a bit it was far easier the fallowing times. I'm about to mount Vee H-Billie tires on the mule rims over the weekend. These tires are about a year old so will see how it goes. I did arm myself with a nice long (good leverage) metal tire lever and the motorcycle bead breaker tool pictured in my earlier post

  40. #40
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    +1 for laying the wheel down and stepping on the tire close to the bead. You're going to fix your equipment with the tools you bring, best to know you can put a tube in a tire trail side when it is 10 degrees and blowing 20 than the try and figure it out when faced with those conditions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHowley2003 View Post
    I'm not sure if I can describe this well but I've had good luck with this method on my Mule Futs. I sit down and anchors my left palm on the outside of the rim. I then place my left elbow up against my left thigh. I then use my right palm and all my body weight against the right side of the tire. I push until I see the bead move then I rotate two or three inches and apply pressure again. On about the third or fourth rotation the head will pop as long as I notice some movement at each push. Oh and make sure you do your Lamaze breathing during each push!
    LOL this description reminds me of that old Milton Bradley game Twister where people are climbing/falling over each other.

  42. #42
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    Haven't tried it outside but was playing around with what was already on the bike. Removed the post/seat, flipped it upside down and put the back of the saddle over the bead. Stood on it and pulled on the post for extra leverage.
    It worked.
    Sometimes Rickety, not a turd

  43. #43
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    It sounds as though many have come close, but have any of you had a tire that could not be removed non-destructively?

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    Attempting this at the moment and was able to break beads free stepping near the rim. However, I can barely get the tire irons under the bead sitting on the rim strip, and when I do they're threatening to break as I try to pry upwards. Are people using metal irons on these? I've always shied away for fear of bending a rim or tearing a tube, but maybe I'll have to track some down (like those mentioned earlier in the thread). Thanks for all the info.

  45. #45
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    After reading this thread, I am glad I have a motorcycle bead breaker in the barn, along with manual tire changing tools.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Nothing to see here, move along folks.

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    Well I got the sucker, nearly broken lever...mine are just too old and a bit too bendy for this, apparently. I've put on some tough tires, usually on the road bike, but I've never had this much trouble getting one off.

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    Metal levers

    Quote Originally Posted by dayooper View Post
    Well I got the sucker, nearly broken lever...mine are just too old and a bit too bendy for this, apparently. I've put on some tough tires, usually on the road bike, but I've never had this much trouble getting one off.
    Yes, I happened to have a set of metal levers from the 80s kicking around. I used them to pry and not slide around the rim. Painstakingly slow to use three of them an inch apart around the wheel. I didn't want to scratch by sliding like we do witha plastic lever. The good news is they didnt break. I agree though, the tight bead is beyond ridiculous.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by dayooper View Post
    Well I got the sucker, nearly broken lever...mine are just too old and a bit too bendy for this, apparently. I've put on some tough tires, usually on the road bike, but I've never had this much trouble getting one off.
    Yes my old Park tool blue levers did not work too well for the task. Had to use screw drivers

    I just purchased these two. Like the longer handles for better leverage and grip. Did not try them out yet to see how they work.

    MileWideSports Solo Bicycle Tire Lever

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    IceToolz DH Nylon-Coated Tire Lever

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  49. #49
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    Last night I was working with my LBS putting together a new Heller Bloodhound. Wheels case tubed. Front wheel, no problem. Rear wheel? Whole nother story. It was as if the fat bike deities made a tubular fat bike wheel. Couldn't get the rear tire off to save our lives.

    Today, my mechanic was told by QBP to ride the bike for a little bit and then bring it back in as riding it should loosen the tire up enough to remove it. Crazy.
    "Ride what you love, love what you ride"

  50. #50
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    Today I took off Vee H-Billie off the wheels on my other fat bike, generic rims that came with Framed Minnesota 3.0 No issues and came off super easy. Then I mounted the Snowshoe tires that I could not get off the Mulefuts. These tires have been laying in garage for maybe a week after I managed to get them off so they did not have any chance to stretch. They went on very easy, no issues at all. So its not the Vee tires its the Mulefuts rims that are the issue. Tomorrow I will be mounting the H-Billie tires on the Mulefuts. Will see hot that goes

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