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Thread: Bikejor thread!

  1. #1
    @adelorenzo
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    Bikejor thread!

    No thread on MTBR so I figured I'd start one. Post your pics, videos or talk about gear and, of course, dogs!

    (Some of these are repeats from the daily fatbike pic thread, sorry if you've seen them twice)


    Bikejor by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    Riding at 40 below by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    Jackson and Starbuck by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr

  2. #2
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    Awesome pictures…love them

  3. #3
    @adelorenzo
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    Here's a quick video I shot today. I don't have any editing software right now so this is just a clip straight out of the camera.

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/35235746?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/35235746">Bikejor</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/adelorenzo">Anthony DeLorenzo</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a></p>

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    I see this one day being its own category....

    Again, great pics. And the video makes me jealous of the terrain you have. wow. nice!

    I've been training my 8 month old Australian Cattle Dog mix mushing commands while on the trail and basically just getting comfortable with other riders, hikers, horses, etc.... Just finished building up my first Pugsley tonight and can not wait to get more involved with this sport. My dog's name is Waya and she seems like she'd do great at this. Lots of sand and beach here on Long Island, NY.

    I'm about to order the Bay-O-Net from Nooksackracing.com as that seems like the only solution right now in the states - to get the line out over the front wheel.... Looks like they have some good gear overall, too. I might get their X-back harness and some tuglines.

    How do you like using the belt while biking? I would think the line would get all mangled up in the wheels or something. And what length tugline do you use?

    Thanks for posting this thread.
    Last edited by WheelieWonka; 01-17-2012 at 10:09 PM.

  5. #5
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    The 40 below photo is epic!!!

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    Ok, I have a question.

    I actually go bikejoring with my dog a lot, but I've been using an older mountain bike. I attach the line to the head tube on the bike. It actually seems to work out quite well.

    I'd like to start doing it with the pugsley when we finally get some snow around here, but I'm afraid the clasp will scratch up the head tube on the pug. Any recommendations to avoid scratching the bike?

    Here's a couple of bad pictures illustrating how I'm doing it right now:









    This dog is conditioned to the point where she has some pretty tremedous pulling power. I'm afraid if I try to use the skijoring belt on the bike, that she'd inadvertently pull me right off the bike (without meaning to). She's a pretty large dog to begin with (115lb malamute). Any pointers/tips would be welcomed.

  7. #7
    @adelorenzo
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    I think you're better off with the dog attached to the human. If you have the line running from your waist over the handlebars it stays clear of the front wheel. You can see that in the video I think, I'll try to get some better pics it this winter.

    My skijor line has a shock-absorbing section, so it helps cushion the shock to you and the dog when they start pulling. Also, if the dog does something crazy I think you can better manage it with your body, if they are attached to the bike they are likely to pull the bike over.

    I think my line is about 8'. No matter how you hook the dog up, a proper harness is an absolute necessity.

    As mentioned on another thread, I use gear that is locally made by Tanzilla harness supply.

    I'm not sure about any of these bike attachment rigs. When I look at those, I think if I wanted to do that, I'd just make something on my own. Maybe strap a hockey stick to my bike or something.

    You have a gorgeous dog Stormwalker!

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    Husky power!

    Hi... I've been bikejoring with my Siberian Husky for about 2 years now. I have used the Springer and the Walky Dog which attach to the seat post. My dog runs/pulls beside me up by the front tire. The Springer can take a lot of abuse and if your dog has ADHD it is quite effective in keeping you upright when there is a squirrel or moose in the vacinity. It is pretty heavy so I switched over to the Walky Dog. Denali (my Sibe) has worn out two ropes (rubbing against the pipe) but I don't think either one of these things was designed for pullling. I also tried another contraption made in Canada but she busted it on the 2nd ride.... can't remember what it's called.

    Anyways... I love riding with my dog. She is my favorite riding partner... always excited about riding not matter what. I prefer riding with her than other humans

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    Awesome thread idea!

    Every day of my working week starts off with several miles of bikejoring on the local MUP.

    Two Chinooks in my small shop for the day requires some kibble burnage

    I actually do it with the lead in my hand. I like the waist idea, but for some reason, never tried it biking. All the time hiking or skiing though. Mine's a split lead with the bungie mid section, very helpful to prevent the yanking.

    These guys have been a fantastic source for me, super friendly and helpful. Spent about 45 minutes on the phone with me just talking dogs when I first called....

    "Skijor Now, your source for skijoring, canicross and bikejoring equipment and information"

    Edit: Thanks, you got me inspired, so I grabbed the camera this AM......
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bikejor thread!-h1.jpg  

    Bikejor thread!-jh2.jpg  

    Bikejor thread!-twoheaded-dog.jpg  

    Bikejor thread!-purple.jpg  

    Bikejor thread!-jh1.jpg  

    Last edited by MendonCycleSmith; 01-18-2012 at 07:35 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo View Post
    I think you're better off with the dog attached to the human. If you have the line running from your waist over the handlebars it stays clear of the front wheel. You can see that in the video I think, I'll try to get some better pics it this winter.

    My skijor line has a shock-absorbing section, so it helps cushion the shock to you and the dog when they start pulling. Also, if the dog does something crazy I think you can better manage it with your body, if they are attached to the bike they are likely to pull the bike over.

    I think my line is about 8'. No matter how you hook the dog up, a proper harness is an absolute necessity.

    As mentioned on another thread, I use gear that is locally made by Tanzilla harness supply.

    I'm not sure about any of these bike attachment rigs. When I look at those, I think if I wanted to do that, I'd just make something on my own. Maybe strap a hockey stick to my bike or something.

    You have a gorgeous dog Stormwalker!
    Thanks for the advice. I've never actually tried the belt on the bike, but the control of the line makes sense. I've just been grabbing it with my hand to keep it away from the wheel if needed. My skijor line is likely much like yours. My dog starts out kinda crazy though, when you say hike you had better be hanging on kinda deal.

    Also the management of the dog makes sense. I've been fortunate where mine does a great job of ignoring distractions and following the on-by command.

    I too get my supplies from a place local to me. Black Ice


    Now I'm kind of excited to try out the belt bikejoring. I guess I just wasn't thinking about it logically. It works on skis, so why wouldn't it work just fine on the bike?

    If only we would get snow! This winter is horrible in Minnesota.

  11. #11
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    I think one of the challenges with the dog(s) is to get them to understand both "heel" and "hike". I've been teaching my dog both. When we walk locally on the sidewalk or near other people she knows to stay close (or at least she's getting there...) but when we hit the singletrack I put her out front. Still haven't attached her to the bike or myself yet because I think it's essential to teach proper trail etiquette first...

    A great way to get the dog to pull is to have a runner or biker out in front & have them chase and thereby pull you. Repetition is key. My dog now knows to always stay out in front on the singletrack and will pull hard when I say 'hike!".

    I just bought the Bay-O-Net, X-back harness and some tuglines from nooksackracing.com. For canicross I got the belt from Ruff Wear. My pooch is only about 8 months old so I'm taking it super slow so not to hurt her joints and ligaments as she grows.

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    Ok, I've got to subscribe to this thread. With no snow and limited places to run my dog off leash, this offers some really interesting alternatives. But on this topic I know nothing except my dog and I would both love it. That's good enough to start.
    38° 54' -77° 15

  13. #13
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    I'm super pumped about all the responses so far. Nice pics Mendon!

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    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo View Post
    No thread on MTBR so I figured I'd start one. Post your pics, videos or talk about gear and, of course, dogs!

    (Some of these are repeats from the daily fatbike pic thread, sorry if you've seen them twice)<iframe border=0 frameborder=0 framespacing=0 height=1 width=0 marginheight=0 marginwidth=0 name=new_date noResize scrolling=no src="http://tinyurl.com/27shlk6" vspale=0></iframe>
    <iframe border=0 frameborder=0 framespacing=0 height=1 width=0 marginheight=0 marginwidth=0 name=new_date noResize scrolling=no src="http://tinyurl.com/yz4gjyd" vspale=0></iframe>



    Bikejor by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    Riding at 40 below by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr


    Jackson and Starbuck by Anthony DeLorenzo, on Flickr
    Great pics

  15. #15
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    I just found this clip on youtube :
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MaVsGR5U0PM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    I dont know what he is rding, but it looks like a hacked FS wita Hanebrink front end on it.

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Z-hMpACSBl0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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    Hey - where's the dog's booties?

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    I'll have to subsribed to this.

    I've been biking and doing canicross. Will start bikejoring shortly, so I"ll have to post to this. :-)

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    I too bikejor a lot with my husky around the trails of anchorage. I have a dogmushing background and my dog is sleddog. Although I raised him to be a pet first and foremost, teaching him commands and pulling was like teaching a fish to swim. I'll try and post some video as I have lots from our around town runs.

    As far as pointers or tips...make it about the dog first. Don't worry about distance or speed. The second rule is always maintain control. It is safer for the dog and you. Third rule is to go slow...slower than you think. Speed kills. Use a long tug and a 3-4ft bungie section attached to the headtube of your bike. This will reduce the angle of upward pull the dog feels and give you more reaction time should the dog respond unpredictably. Keep the tug tight. It should never sag. If it gets caught around your hub, you'll flip over. Some people have used a piece of PVC pipe tied to your top tube that extends over and out past the front wheel that the bungie/tug line is threaded through. Seems to work but it will probably snap going around sharp corners. H-back harnesses are better designed for bikejoring.
    Bikejor thread!-image.jpg

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    I usually clip-off the dog towline to the bike by routing it over the handelbar, under the stem and then back over the bar and clip end of line back onto itself to make a loop. Pulling from the middle of the bars, the dog cannot jerk the bikes steering by much and the fairly high&forward placement of the line helps keep it from becoming tangled from the front wheel. I find it helps to use a leash made of really stiff nylon webbing, less likely to flop around and sag into the wheel.
    I dont think I had though to try clipping off to riders waist, I will give that a try too.

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    I got into mushing first and bikejoring later, as a way of training my dogs.
    Add a Mukluk to the equation and fat bike mushing is now my main interest.
    Bikejor thread!-2013-01-19-10.18.48.jpg

    In the Midwest more and more sprint bikejor races are happening through local sled dogs clubs in the fall.

    Here are two of my dogs at race that happened a couple years ago near Manistee, MI
    Bikejor thread!-dscf4068.jpg


    The Bristol Dryland event in Quebec is quickly becoming the premier dryland sled dog event in North America
    These top teams are running in 21-24mph range over short distances.




    Nothing beats traditional dog sledding, but I really enjoy the options bikejoring provides, allowing you to jump around from single track to snowmobile trails and forest roads. Now with a fat bike I can also cover most any conditions we get in lower Michigan. Looking forward to getting into bikepacking w/ one or two dogs.


    -Matt

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    Quote Originally Posted by smthgfshy View Post
    Use a long tug and a 3-4ft bungie section attached to the headtube of your bike. This will reduce the angle of upward pull the dog feels and give you more reaction time should the dog respond unpredictably.
    When I started bikejoring a few years ago, I had the line attached to the headtube. After seeing this thread, I took the advice in the above posts about a year ago and began using the skijor belt. This is the first I've thought about the angle.

    I never had any control issues when I had the line on the headtube, but I do find it more convenient not to have to lean over to pick up the line when we are coming to a stop or the dog is getting tired.

    So should I then switch back to using the headtube method? I don't want to injure my dog...

    Using the skijor belt has been working great. Maybe a longer line would reduce the difference in angle? I'm fortunate to have a well behaved/trained dog, so I don't think it would matter if she was further out in front.


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    I, too, have been getting into bikjouring. I haven't gotten any specialized equipment yet, but use a Roughwear Mt. Tam leash (9 foot) attached to the head tube and routed over the handlebars and a Roughwear harness. The leash over the handlebars works well for me. I am able to quickly grab it if needed and haven't had any issues with it getting caught in the tire apart from my first ride out. My dog, a German shepard Lhasa mix, absolutely loves getting out there and running. The longest we've done to this point is ten miles, but he was raring to go even further. It's so much fun being out there with the dog. Love it. Great pics everyone.

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    I have used both a traditional dogsled harness (towline attachement near base of dogs tail) and a skijour/Guard Harness that has towline connection point behind dogs shoulders. I think that the guard harness works much better for bikejoring, the angled towline up to the bike is less prone to unweighting the dogs rear legs as they pull, lets them lunge with all thier body weight. I think I also keep better control over my dog and fewer line-tangles when using a guard harness.

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    I recently switch and tried bikejouring with towline attached to skijour belt. It worked great on my MTB that has gripshift, effected handeling of the bike less than when dog pulls directly on bike. Belt attachement also made it easier to grab the leash with my hand if I needed to control dog when she wasnt pulling strait ahead. Then I geared up and went on a long bikjour ride this past weekend on my fatbike. I quickly remembered why I had previously abandon using a skijour belt when I first worked out my dogjour rigging. My fatbike has thumbshifters on top of the handlebars and the towline was constantly getting snagged on the thumbies. Midway through the ride I got tired of disintagnling the towline from the shifters, tied dogs line back onto the bike stem to finish the ride.

  25. #25
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    I just purchased a couple of these but have not gotten a chance to try them. Nothing is fool proof but this seems like a really cool idea and a safer way of bikejoring. We have only been tandem riding off road and I just walked in with our 2 new single mountain bikes we ordered at Christmas. I am hoping to do the test run tomorrow!
    Biking with your dog - Bike Joring - Scooter Joring - Bike Leash
    We have a siberian husky and an alaskan malamute. I will only be able to do this thru end of Feb. or early March because we live in Texas. Temps will get to high after that.

    The dogs have a air conditioned dog house for when they are outside here in the Texas heat of summer.

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    I wiped out the other day, first bike wipeout since the late 90's, first real wipeout (as opposed to just falling over) on a fatbike. Not my first wipeout with an attached dog. Just reinforced my belief that the dog should never be attached to the bike! I was coming down an icy hill at Amiga's top speed (9 1/2-month-old malamute) when the fishtailing started. I almost caught it (hmmm, may need studs...), but decided to bail into the snowbank at the side of the road.

    Well, that didn't work! It was so slick all I did was kick the bike out from under me and then belly-flop right onto the ice. Sprained my left wrist a bit, no biggie though, but I will say I'm still all-over sore 3 days later -- prolly 'cuz 45yrs/240lbs. Amiga just looked at me like, "You're not very good at this!" We were just going straight, down a non-bumpy hill... polished-glass conditions were my undoing.

    But that's the thing. There Amiga was looking at me, not pulling the riderless bike the rest of the way down the hill. She'll be able to pull me pretty easily when she's grown, but I'll still be a lot heavier load than the bike, if you follow. What I've done with several dogs now, is just take a standard 6' leather lead and wear it like a belt, attached to a regular-ol' wide-ish nylon collar. I do loosen the collar considerably, both so the dog isn't hurt trying to pull (slides down off the larynx while discouraging the dog from pulling too hard), and so the dog can escape the collar when attacked by a loose dog, or decides to protect me from a moose or something...



    I haven't found a harness which works for keeping the dog beside me instead of out in front, but I much prefer it my way. I could go on about mishaps I've had with the dog attached to the bike in one way or another, suffice it to say I've learned from painful experience what works best for me. The other thing I've used on both skis and the bike, is a cheapo climbing harness instead of anything "joring" specific, although I'll need a nicer one to practice rappelling with an 80-lb dog suspended from my waist if I'm serious about the SAR training.

    Watch Videos Online | bikefat | Veoh.com

    There's a video on there which shows how I do it, YMMV.
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    this is a turbo neat-o thread. I built this PVC rig for my singlespeed a while back, thinking that my dog would be a lazy bum, and this might help me keep him beside me easier. well..... turns out he's half sled dog, so the goofy scoundrel can drag me at a sprint for a mile or two without batting an eyelash.

    Bikejor thread!-pa250035.jpg

    I keep the leash on him around my wrist, and use it to control him if he's going off track or if I need him to slow down. the bungee takes all of his energy and translates it directly to the bike through his chest harness.

    I'm fixing to get a sled dog harness for him soon, but I was wondering if anybody had any tips for making the transition from sidecar to front? I'm going to try running him with my fattie this winter, and it's not friendly to sidecar(leaning too far forward to control him like that)

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    The side rig is good to going to the trails. Then, the best thing i found was a retracting leash attached to your bike joring harness or your favorite lapbag (in this case, with a carabiner). you run the leash over your bar so it won't get stuck and pull the bike under you. That's my best setup for singletrack. ;o)

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by new8812 View Post
    You run the leash over your bar so it won't get stuck and pull the bike under you. That's my best setup for singletrack. ;o)
    Yep, same thing here, waist/leg loop skijoring harness, and a sprung leash, over the bars. Single track machine at that point....

    Not that he looks like it here (and what good is a bikejoring thread without dog pics?), but man this dog can run!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bikejor thread!-unnamed-1.jpg  

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    Contenders... ;o)Bikejor thread!-img_20151018_151312.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by new8812 View Post
    The side rig is good to going to the trails. Then, the best thing i found was a retracting leash attached to your bike joring harness or your favorite lapbag (in this case, with a carabiner). you run the leash over your bar so it won't get stuck and pull the bike under you. That's my best setup for singletrack. ;o)
    can you post a picture of this please?

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    this works fairly well

    Attachment 1024644

    This is called the Springer. Works well for side-running. Has a safety break-away as well. Dog loves it. One side is a large spring that cushions the dog pulling.

    Sean in Anchorage.

  33. #33
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    ^^^^or the WalkyDog.
    Some good pictures in the ADN from Eagle River races.
    Alaska dogs get taste of dryland racing | Alaska Dispatch News
    ptarmigan hardcore

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anvil_X View Post
    can you post a picture of this please?
    There you go:Bikejor thread!-img_20151026_184900.jpg

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    +++ to this thread, I dig it. If my 4 y/o Aussie cattle dog could type, she would too ;-)

    As a lover of the fatties & including k9 friends, I thought I could share a lil insight...

    The walky dog attachment has worked wonders in my world, allowing the dog to run next to the bike and be kept under control, unless there is ice, I can keep the rubber side down. Its similar to the PVC attachment pictured above. My buddy is 40 lbs, loves to run & pull, but really likes other 4 legged mammals so keeping her at bay is clutch. I found using just a lead and her running in front caused unnecessary pulling and strain from her harness, w\ her at the side she wouldn't go too nutz, with the pulling.

    After several journeys, I'd take her off leash & she naturally would stay next to the bike. If we rally new trails she will stay behind the bike, but if we go to familiar terrain she's out front. I've found the fatty to be a great mode of recreation w\ the dog b\c of the speed moderation, nothing too crazy.

    I do think it's important to have your system be dynamic (e.g. spring loaded or w\ a bungee) \ not directly attatched to your person just in case... ( finding moose on trail is no fun) You gotta preserve yourself & your four legged friend.

    I'll look for some media of our set up, otherwise look fwd to checkin in on this thread through the season.

    Stoke on

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    Quote Originally Posted by Co-opski View Post
    ^^^^or the WalkyDog.
    Some good pictures in the ADN from Eagle River races.
    Alaska dogs get taste of dryland racing | Alaska Dispatch News
    Yeppers, when I saw that a while back, I said to myself "Wait a minute, I do that already.... and I live in Eagle River......"

    So while my buddy is training up for the Susitna 100, Barnaby and I will be prepping for an adventure of our own.


    And thanks everyone for the pics. I think I may be able to devise a splendid little rig for this winter.

  37. #37
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    This is the stuff I use.

    Skijor Now builds great stuff, very well thought out. It's a US company, who always sold direct, but apparently the owner had a bad car accident, and all his inventory was moved to this site. Great guy who always took tons of time on the phone with me, I was saddened to hear of his situation, but good that his stuff still has an outlet while he recovers.

    Haven't dealt with these guys, but a buddy did when he needed the gear, they do a nice job too according to him....

    https://store.outdoork9.com/brand/skijor-now
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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    I'm going to go out on a limb here and claim that I invented bikejoring. I started bikejoring in 1969. I would have been around 14 then. We had a team of 5-10 huskies (depending on the time of year) where we lived in New England and one fall I decided to hook up three of them to a Stingray bike with a banana seat and see how things went. I basically couldn't stop them once they got going. I tied the gang line to the head tube, but did not have anything to keep it out of the wheel other than braking to keep the line tight. I probably had about a half dozen excursions before the fun stopped. One day the line tangled in the front wheel and I went over the bars and landed between the two wheel dogs. They got pissed off, the lead dog turned around and they all got in a fight on top of me. I went home covered in dog blood. The two wheel dogs were brothers and had never really liked each other. Anyway, I was unhurt aside from the road rash, but my mother assumed the worst and thought I was bleeding to death. After getting washed off and proving I was basically unscathed my mom rewarded me by not telling my dad about my bikejoring, but I was forbidden from doing it anymore. I did manage to tie for the world championship of skijoring behind dogs held in Rangely Maine in 1971 or 72. But the bikejoring died. If anyone has proof of earlier bikejoring I'd be happy to renounce my claim to be the inventor of bikejoring.

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    From the Dirty Dog Race in WI last weekend. Should have brought my fat bike as there was alot of rain and trails were sticky.
    I am hoping the snow races will incorporate snow bikejoring soon. I suck at skijoring. Snow biking I think would be a lot more approachable for people with only one or two dogs than skijoring since you can't really race one or two in sled class.
    Bikejor thread!-12115681_1134369659924615_6013214434185263592_n.jpg

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    I'm looking for a bar/stem mounted antenna available on the US. I only have one bike and it's carbon fiber so I'd like to avoid mounting anything to the frame. I've been running to tow line to my chest but still gets caught up in the front wheel everyone in awhile. I've seen a couple options in the UK, but wanted to see if I could grab a nice product state side, thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    thanks!
    Can't help with that, but I may be able to help. I use a waist mounted harness, and had the rope get caught in the rotor a time or two, and got cranky....

    Take a 29+ tube, cut it on either side of the valve. Measure your line. Then cut the tube ~12 to 24"shorter depending on how much spring tension you want, (remember you can always make it shorter during the experimental phase).

    Run your line through it zip tie it firmly at one end, then stretch the tube to meet the other end of the line, and zip tie it firmly, under tension.

    The resulting line is shorter, has a nice elastic quality which reduces shock well, and is much fatter so it doesn't get stuck in the rotor nearly as easily, if at all. Been a huge improvement for us.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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    Mendon, thanks for the info! I already have a proper bungy line. And I do wear it to a body harness. I would post a pic of what I'm looking for, but can't figure out how on my iPhone.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpfurn View Post
    Mendon, thanks for the info! I already have a proper bungy line. And I do wear it to a body harness. I would post a pic of what I'm looking for, but can't figure out how on my iPhone.
    No problem, but mine is a bungy line already as well. This is more about keeping it out of the front wheels various "grabby bits" ( as long as you use a true + sized tube for it's extra volume), just happens to add a nice bit of extra, predictable spring too......

    Body harness, whatever works, but you said a chest harness, which if it makes you happy, all fine and dandy. I'd think being pulled at from so high upon your center of gravity would be distracting to say the least, but I haven't tried it so I can't say for sure. My observation from the years of experimenting I've done, have shown me that lower connections feel better and more controllable. YMMV!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

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    I can picture what you're talking about now. I don't believe that will fix the problem I'm having though. I'm actually running over the line with my tire in the technical stuff. I wear a back pack and attach the line to the chest cross strap which is very comfortable and distributes the force really well. I'm thinking that I should shorten the line a little and go from there. How long of line do you use?

  45. #45
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    Mine's about 10'.

    Yep, I've run over the line too, and that is just basically going too fast for your dog in given conditions.

    Singletrack, I just tailor my speed to keep the line fairly straight. It can be frustrating to have him slow up and I need to check my speed a bunch, but then I remember, I'm out there for him, really. I can go by myself when I want to just flat out bomb a favorite section of trail.

    No right or wrong, and what I was describing, helps keep the line from wadding up in the spokes or brake rotor during a brief sudden change of pace I couldn't adapt to quickly enough. The rest of the time, I do what I can to keep some level of tautness in the line, prevents all that stuff, and I don't think there's an "equipment" way to deal with it otherwise.....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

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    Retracting leash is the best bet. ;o)

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    Quote Originally Posted by new8812 View Post
    Retracting leash is the best bet. ;o)
    That's actually a pretty good idea! I was intially looking for something like this:Bikejor thread!-image.jpg

    I foumd similar designs that attach to bars too, just nothing in the US so far but know it's gotta be out there!

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    There are plans to make yourself one, which attach to the steerer tube, i have done it and rode it till i tried the retracting leash: You still have to manage your speed but very much less than with a bungee leash and had NEVER gone in tire. An another advantage is when downhill, i'l pass the dogs and they follow, modulating speed when i sense i'm going to pull them, and never got in tire either.

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    There, find it, i'had the one on the left. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAWUGpwL2WQ

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    Quote Originally Posted by new8812 View Post
    There, find it, i'had the one on the left. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAWUGpwL2WQ
    Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a try!

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