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  1. #1
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    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?

    I was curious if anyone out there would be willing to share how well the Best Tracksled is working for grooming? Any comparison to a Rokon/roller combo or other implement would be great.

    We recently got the ok to groom a 15 mile singletrack loop and are trying to determine what will be the best option for grooming. We are using snowmobiles pulling a roller and a Rokon pulling a roller on some of our other trail systems but the Tracksled looks pretty interesting. Seems like it is a more simple device (aka less to break/fail/maintain), the price is right and looks like it can handle tight singletrack.

    Ken

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    Cuyuna - We got the first one.

    The newer version designed around what worked and what didn't with ours is much easier to maneuver.

    This is a demonstration at Marquette in 40d weather and (very) wet snow. I was there along with another Crew member: https://youtu.be/MRlutC-7ak4

    https://youtu.be/MRlutC-7ak4

    If you want more details, PM me.

  3. #3
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    Sure looks like a lot more work than sitting on the Skandic, I could see it if the trails are to tight for a snowmopile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Sure looks like a lot more work than sitting on the Skandic, I could see it if the trails are to tight for a snowmopile.
    Yes, either in trail width or in radi of turns (or both). Also, the groomed width is true singletrack, 20" wide, if you go with the narrowest groom.

  5. #5
    N8R
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    I'm in the process of building a tracksled for grooming my own trails and should have it finish within a couple weeks. I'll let you know how it does

    My design is significanlty better than the Best Tracksled in several ways, including a much lower center of gravity. I'm using a 13hp 5 spd Honda ATC 200 with an automatic centrifugal clutch as the power plant. These old Honda motors go forever and are about as reliable as you can get.

    13 hp is fine for grooming established trails that have been packed and groomed frok the start of the season, but is not a lot of power for making new trails in deeper powder. Should still be doable if multiple passes are made to precompress the snow before trying to pull a groomer.

    As far as it being alot more work than a sled......not necessarily. If you dont want to stand up, just put a seat on it. I'll have a wide bike saddle on the groomer so I can sit when I want. It will take a little more effort to steer due to you pivoting the entire mass of the track sled, but still not something to make a deal about.

    One big advantage of the tracksled is all your body weight is directly on top of the groomer so you dont have to carry extra dead weight for compaction which is a very significant advantage in a low hp machine. The Best Tracksled groomer shown in the videos is a rather poor design as it has no notches to create a corderoy pattern in the snow for bike tire traction. Not absolutely necessary, but if you're going to make a groomer, why not make it to make the best trail with the most amount of traction. Also, it has a fairly large footprint which compacts less. Using a small 4" corrugated roller has a much smaller footprint and will give way more compaction for the same weight.

    My design will also have a bike mount ontop of the tracksled so I can take my fat bike with me when I groom, in case of a machine failure, I can ride out. Plus it'll look awesome with my steed mounted on it. Another bonus, the extra 35 lbs on top of the tracksled will be welcomed additional traction.

    One flaw, if it can be called that, with the Best Tracksled design is the front track profile. Its low and a perfect semi-circle which is a poor design for powder perfomance in breaking trail/compacting initial contact snow. Look at snowmobiles and the front underside of the track angles up to help precompact the snow for the rest of the track. I'll be incorporating this feature in my build.

    All in all, the Best Tracksled is a noble attempt at making a simple trail groomer and they did a decent job, but still much can be improved upon. IMO, its a much more capable trail groomer than a Rokon. Rokons are also only about 13 hp, and have way less traction and deep snow potential, even being 2wd.

    I'll be making several more tracksleds after my prototype and keep working to improve the design and may even offer a few for sale if theres interest, although I dont really want to turn it into a job. I'll start a new thread in a couple weeks or so with my finished machine and pics/video. I really think a tracksled is the best way forward for fatbike grooming narrow single track, and it can easily fit on a hitch rack on the back of a car or truck. Much easier to load and transport.

  6. #6
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    I would suggest that that adding weight vertically is going to have unforeseen issues. Our first one had a 13hp motor. It was extra-ordinarily tippy in off-camber or bermed corners conditions. Like "nearly kill volunteers" tippy. The newer ones have 7hp engines and pull fine and far less tippy.

    We are testing a new one created by a local company. The first thing we requested is as little weight above the track as possible. We've found that tracksled seems to do best when it's floating on the snow vs. plowing through it.

    As to the flatness of the groom, the new grooms we use have a whole bunch of 1/2" deep skegs vs. 2 or 3 deeper ones. Otherwise its flat. At Cuyuna we haven't found a bike traction/ice issue with this design, generally the fat bike tires come along and "chew up" the top 1/8" of the groomed surface anyway. I would like to see a "mini-roller" style groom, with a bunch of 4-8" textured rollers in front of foot plate, I think that type of design would be great to refresh the already groomed trail.

    If you are thinking you've hit cats meow with your tracksled design, and live decently close to MN, PM me and I will send you some information.

    I'm with you, the Best Tracksled is work in progress, but I think over the long haul some type of tracksled based device will the grooming answer.

  7. #7
    N8R
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    CycleKrieg, hope I didn't come across as being cynical towards your design in my post. I'm a critical thinker and am always trying to point out flaws and potential design improvements, even in my own work to continuously improve, and not to discredit past achievements. I think you guys have done a good job and watching your demo vids convinced me tracksled is the way to go. I've been pondering for a while the best machine for fat bike trail grooming, and its down to the tracksled and snow bike, with tracksled having some distinct advantages.

    I've spent a lot of time thinking about the ideal groomed trail, and its not the same IMO as the perfect ski groomed trail. Skiis are long and are better suited to nice flat trails without deep curves and dips. Bikes on the other hand, are well suited to big dips, rollers, etc and this is part of what makes it fun. An overly long machine has a hard time following the contours of deep dips and is less manuverable which is the major flaw I see with current snow bikes fitted with a Timbersled kit. I have a pretty cool short wheelbase snow bike design I may build in the future, but the tracksled is so much simpler, with better weight placement with much lighter overall weight potential, I may never even get to the snow bike design.

    I've got some more ideas for the tracksled, and I'm even planning on building a 50-100 hp version for powder and backcountry use. I wasn't going to give away my design idea yet, as I wanted to be the first to build it. However, I'm more interested in the progression of fat bike snow grooming. To get the center of gravity as low as possible, I'm putting the engine and entire drivetrain inside the track, not ontop. The bottom of the engine will only be about 2" off the ground. The top of the track will go over the engine, and the only thing above the track will be the gas tank. But I may even put the has tank below inside the track on a future build and use a fuel pump to get the fuel to the carb.

    With this motor-in-track design, even a high hp large motor can be used and still have a really low COG. I'm not interested in having a large business making and selling tracksleds, maybe just a few here and there so I'm more than willing to share ideas and collborate on design with you guys, and like I said, I'm more interested in progressing the sport than anything else. I'm in Utah so too far to meetup, but shoot me a p.m. with your contact info and we can talk design.

    Also, on the groomer side of things, the reason the top of the groomed snow gets chewed up by tires is because it isnt packed down densley enough, had time to set up enough, or its too warm out and snow is softening. If the snow gets packed down hard enough with enough weight and as little foot print as possible, the top edges of the grooves in the groom should not be damaged much by low psi tires. If snow is compressed enough, it turns into ice. So if we can achieve the sweet spot of super hard pack, groomed snow but not quite to the point of turning to ice, I think we'll have some durable, fast, good traction trails that retain the ridges in the groom as long as it stays below freezing. How feasable this is, I dont know yet. It could well be that its not easy to achieve this and the top of the groom will always get chewed up by tires, but I'm motivated to try and perfect the art of fat bike grooming.

  8. #8
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    I'm not affiliated with Best Tracksled at all, other then being a customer. I am a big supporter of the tracksled for fat bike grooming, though, and think more clubs should go that way. We (being fat bike groomers) need to work with builders to create the best solution possible.

    We have different needs. In the Midwest, we need something that can go up punchy climbs, fit between trees, turn tight and is safer than a Rokon, etc. That is why we like the МОТОБУКСИРОВЩИК (literally, "Motor Sled Dog") style tracksled, similar to the units you can buy in Russia from Praxus, Boltmotr or Lebedev. We also would like something a 120# woman can use, so versus the tipsy beast that was the 13hp one, we have downsized.

    The style you are talking about is similar to Crosley T28 or the more refined Crosley T28E-1. The Ski-zee from Canadian uses a small power unit like that. The Russians had something similar, though that was 2-cycle and with the tank up by the user. ( http://i027.radikal.ru/0912/ba/dfab2ad449ae.jpg )

    Yeah, if you were closer, I would invite you to our groom learning/cross-pollination session.

    We are getting pretty good compaction and its not instantly getting chewed up. But a few days with fat bike tires on it does chew up the top little bit. That's why a refreshing groom would be nice. Don't over compact, just uniformly chew up and squish back down.

    At our race last year, we ran 300 racers over tracksled groomed sections and those sections held up better than the doubletrack which was groomed with a Yellowstone groomer.

    I do wish I had some actual "building things" skills because I would build something like the Technomaster Ruff TM-02, but with drop in grooms under the seat.

    Look forward to seeing your version!

  9. #9
    N8R
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    Great info, and thanks for the links I'll check them out. I think an in-track design is going to be hard to beat for stability and can accomodate any engine size. I'm projecting total machine weight to be 250lbs or less for my first build and with light weight components, future builds could be sub 200lbs. Have you weighed your Best tracksled? I started a build thread you can follow here:

    Intrak Tracksled groomer build- Mtbr.com

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    Thanks for the warning about Cuyuna's old tracksled, I've tossed a few messages back and forth with Aaron about buying it. It looked clumsy to me, but if the price was right (it isnt) I would have been willing to try. We have 10 miles to groom here in Fargo-Moorhead. Still looking for a solution! I'll have to hit you up when I head to Cuyuna again. The groomed riding there this January was amazing! Then again every trip to Cuyuna is amazing.
    Jason
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    We have 10 miles to groom here in Fargo-Moorhead. Still looking for a solution!
    PM me with your email address/contact info, we (Cuyuna) are working on some learning/cross-pollination/ideas/come-to-Jesus stuff that will help everyone in upper midwest with grooming.

    I will say the newer models Best Tracksled is pretty easy to use. You are still going to get an upper body workout, but you won't be toasted after a mile. Also, it's not so overpowered and heavy that it drives volunteers vs. the other way around. (In Soviet Russia, tracksled drive you.)

    As I said before, this will be a user based solution and we will have work on it ourselves. That may mean in short run caring less about keeping secrets and more about sharing and communicating.

  12. #12
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    Still waiting for this to come to market: Home | MTT136 Yvon Martel.
    Advantages I see: 1. low maintenance motor, 2. maneuverability, 3. light weight, fits in SUV, 4. stealth (electric motor) to facilitate grooming trails in areas where motorized vehicles are prohibited.

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    wow, jealous of your abilities.... I'm in Western NY and have been having the hope and dream of grooming some of our local trails. done the snowshoe, marquette skies, pulling a tire, pan of a wheelbarrow, etc.... then bought a gravely tractor, then a rokon, then a small arctic cat panther sled, now trying a ski doo alpine, twin track..... problem is that last week, we got 20 inches of snow in 36 hours... so anything but a deep powder snowmachine is going to bog down especially when trying to follow the trail...

    I too, have been looking at all the ingenuity on youtube, (seems like a lot of ideas come out of Russia)... I'd be willing to help fund a local project for a "tracksled" type contraption, I really like the idea of the INtrak mockup you have N8R. be willing to buy blueprints, parts list, and a how to book if any of you are thinking of going that way.

  14. #14
    N8R
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    wow, jealous of your abilities.... I'm in Western NY and have been having the hope and dream of grooming some of our local trails. done the snowshoe, marquette skies, pulling a tire, pan of a wheelbarrow, etc.... then bought a gravely tractor, then a rokon, then a small arctic cat panther sled, now trying a ski doo alpine, twin track..... problem is that last week, we got 20 inches of snow in 36 hours... so anything but a deep powder snowmachine is going to bog down especially when trying to follow the trail...

    I too, have been looking at all the ingenuity on youtube, (seems like a lot of ideas come out of Russia)... I'd be willing to help fund a local project for a "tracksled" type contraption, I really like the idea of the INtrak mockup you have N8R. be willing to buy blueprints, parts list, and a how to book if any of you are thinking of going that way.
    I never build anything with blueprints, I just make a quick concept drawing, sometimes, or just have the idea in my head and build as I go. Fabricating isn't all that hard, especially with the internet and youtube tutorials on about everything. Best thing is to just jump in and start doing it! My 2 pieces of advice to anyone wanting to learn is to not worry too much about making mistakes, they are valuable learned lessons, and always safety first! I'll be documenting the build in the link I posted above, so feel free to ask any questions there on how I'm doing anything.

  15. #15
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    Tracksleds can handle deep snow.

    https://youtu.be/3sfhOyA8qQA

    Some models in Russia have an removable upward curving "bill" in front of the track to increase length and floatation. Yeah, it would be a two or three pass groom, first with tracksled and small Otter sled and then coming back with the actual groomer, but with some throttle work and not putting your biggest volunteer in there first, it should be doable.

    twright205, if you know someone that can build one of these, give it a shot. Otherwise some manufacturers are coming online. Best Tracksled is there, the new prototype we are testing for another company is almost there. N8R might be getting there also.

    What's going to happen in the long term, I think, is that there will be a messy beginning with lots of Darwinian sorting going on with tracksled designs and features before a "typical" model is birthed. It might be 2 models, a small one, for east of the Rockies that can handle tight spaces, corners and trees and a large one, for west of the Rockies that can handle long grooming sessions in the mountains.

  16. #16
    N8R
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    CycleKrieg, thanks for all the links of the Russian tracksleds. I didnt even know they existed so it will be a huge help examining their designs. It'll be fun to see where we end up with them.

  17. #17
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    Might be some worthwhile ideas here: ONE, 2 OR 3 TRACKED RIGID VEHICLES, LIGHT

    Subscribed

  18. #18
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    I think the tracksleds are definitely the future of singletack grooming. For the time being our group took an AD Boivin Snow hawk JR and made a custom roller to pull. Our trails are very tight with steep elevation, this set-up worked well, however it didn't have enough power and the Snow Hawk engine is a piece of junk. During the off season we put a new 6.5 hp engine in the Snow Hawk and it pulls the 60 pound roller no problem, 1 pass and our singletrack trails are perfect. The only thing that could make the set up better would be a little wider track on the snow Hawk.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-fat.jpeg  

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-image1.jpg  

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-img_1357.jpg  

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-img_1356.jpg  

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    So if we can achieve the sweet spot of super hard pack, groomed snow but not quite to the point of turning to ice, I think we'll have some durable, fast, good traction trails that retain the ridges in the groom as long as it stays below freezing. How feasable this is, I dont know yet. It could well be that its not easy to achieve this and the top of the groom will always get chewed up by tires, but I'm motivated to try and perfect the art of fat bike grooming.
    I don't think that you will ever retain the ridges after a bike rides over your work. I used to operate snowcats at ski resorts and that high speed tiller in the back beats the arms off of the snow crystals night after night to quickly turn the trail into hardpack and the ridges would still deform quite easily. I don't think it is important to maintain those ridges for fat biking though.

    One resort I worked at modified cats to spray water on the trails and that would create a really strong base at least, but not practical for the application you guys are talking about here as the weight would be tremendous.

    Pretty neat to follow this discussion though. The machines people are posting here look as fun as actually biking the trails.

  20. #20
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    I thought this was interesting: SNOWDOG CLUB Looks like the Russian Baltmotors tracksled is working on districbution in the US.

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    If you haven't yet, hit up the NTN. Earlier this year at the Fatbike Summit they tried one out on the North Trails and I was told they were purchasing one. The resulting groomed surface was nice to ride, and they were able to get it through narrower corridors and up/down greater slopes than they could with the snowmobile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bbudell View Post
    I thought this was interesting: SNOWDOG CLUB Looks like the Russian Baltmotors tracksled is working on districbution in the US.

    That looks pretty cool and reasonably priced.

    Their dealer locator shows dealers in the U.S.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
    That looks pretty cool and reasonably priced.

    Their dealer locator shows dealers in the U.S.
    I'm somewhat suprised the snowdog has not gotten more traction as a groomer. I believe it's safe to say that one of these snowdogs will make it's way into western WI in the near future for grooming singletrack.

    The price is right for one of these, and as mentioned above it's nice to have a dealer backing. The design also looks spot on, which only makes sense as the Russians typically have to deal with lots of snow.

    As a bonus it appears this unit may work well for hauling equipment in the summer months.

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    Just pulled the trigger on the 10hp compact snowdog model. expect it to get to me in Western NY by 12/28... of course two weeks ago we got over 20 inches of snow in 36 hours. now with a chronic thaw, melt, rain cycle, who knows what I will have to play with when it gets here.. but Winter just started so I am sure there will be opportunities... I'll be sure to post up some pics and videos if it works like I am hoping... if you are in the market.. I dealt with Vlad v.filatenko@snowdog.club .... if you happen to be in Southern Ontario check out Scott at jsperformance@computan.com I know he had a compact 10hp... and a few of the regulars coming in....

    Merry Christmas and here's to a grooming new year

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by blum585 View Post
    I'm somewhat suprised the snowdog has not gotten more traction as a groomer. I believe it's safe to say that one of these snowdogs will make it's way into western WI in the near future for grooming singletrack.

    The price is right for one of these, and as mentioned above it's nice to have a dealer backing. The design also looks spot on, which only makes sense as the Russians typically have to deal with lots of snow.

    As a bonus it appears this unit may work well for hauling equipment in the summer months.
    One of our local trail groomers in northern WI is thinking about buying one of these.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  26. #26
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    Whats the price of the Snowdog?
    Jason
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    Whats the price of the Snowdog?
    Prices are given on the web site; about $3k+/-: SNOWDOG CLUB

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    Thanks, I missed that. I'm tempted! This from the FAQ is concerning though:

    Why Snowdog`s engine shut down when going up the hill?

    Snowdog is equipped with an automatic oil level sensor that shuts the engine with a low oil level or when Snowdog is at a large angle of inclination. We recommend to place the Snowdog in the horizontal position, check the oil level and start the engine.
    Jason
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    Thanks, I missed that. I'm tempted! This from the FAQ is concerning though:

    Why Snowdog`s engine shut down when going up the hill?

    Snowdog is equipped with an automatic oil level sensor that shuts the engine with a low oil level or when Snowdog is at a large angle of inclination. We recommend to place the Snowdog in the horizontal position, check the oil level and start the engine.
    Well, Having purchased a snowdog for our local club 2 days ago then grooming for the past 2 nights I can say that the engine does not shut down on anything it can actually climb. It does shut down if it's about to tip over, it's got to be at a 45 deg angle or greater. With this said, like every tool, it does have it's limitations. It tracks much better on side hills when the left side of the unit is on the up hill side of the hill. And it's not something that you can just unload and go. unless you are grooming really flat areas. If you are grooming singletrack it will take some time to learn to use it, trust it, and find it's limits. I groomed some of the tightest single track found in La Crosse WI, and after learning how to use it go through nearly everything. It does have width limitations, but then again so do your handle bars. I got through trees that seem tight in the summer with 720mm wide bars.

    We picked our unit up and Kinni Sport and Power in Riverfalls, WI. The snowdog is new as of this year to the states. We paid $3165 (tax included) for the unit, the sled, seat and cup holder. Haven't used the seat, and have only groomed with the sled. We will be working on testing attachments that may led to better grooming. All of this fatbike grooming is still a work in progress.

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    The tracking on hills is due to the gyroscopic forces of the clutch mechanism. (We have had the same thing with our tracksleds, they are not Snowdogs.) If it really bothers you, groom the trail in a direction determined by which side (left or right) has the most uphill to it. Otherwise, you get used to it.

    Build a groom vs. using the otter-style sled. You will get better results, the groom can be easier to maneuver. We've only used pan grooms so far, but have ideas to build a small roller groom (6" lawnmower wheels) and leveling/de-icing groom (reverse V).

    Another thing we found: grooms work best if they have a skeg (the vertical runners) every 2" or so across the bottom. The skegs then can be shorter (3/4") in height and you will get better tracking and easier to maneuver because you get more vertical surfaces to interface with the snow. Having only 2 skegs, one on each side means the downhill skegs is just flapping in the breeze without much snow push against. A series of them across the bottom give you uniform bite across the whole surface.

    Questions:
    Did you get the 7hp or 10hp model?
    Compact model?
    Is the include headlight worth anything?

  31. #31
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    Our trails are very flat, this thing looks ideal. I'll reach out to the dealer in St. Cloud! Thanks for the info!

    Edit: The 10hp Compact model, sled, and seat would be $~3280 after tax. In stock too!
    Last edited by JAGI410; 12-23-2016 at 08:52 AM.
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    mine is set to arrive in Western NY on Tuesday or Wednesday,,, I got the 10hp.. compact model, looking into fabricating other stand on grooming attachments as well. please post up pics of ideas if anyone has one.. thanks for the update on your experience, really hoping this does the trick.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    looking into fabricating other stand on grooming attachments as well. please post up pics of ideas if anyone has one.
    You mean like this one?

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-tracksled-groom-pan.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    The tracking on hills is due to the gyroscopic forces of the clutch mechanism. (We have had the same thing with our tracksleds, they are not Snowdogs.) If it really bothers you, groom the trail in a direction determined by which side (left or right) has the most uphill to it. Otherwise, you get used to it.

    Build a groom vs. using the otter-style sled. You will get better results, the groom can be easier to maneuver. We've only used pan grooms so far, but have ideas to build a small roller groom (6" lawnmower wheels) and leveling/de-icing groom (reverse V).

    Another thing we found: grooms work best if they have a skeg (the vertical runners) every 2" or so across the bottom. The skegs then can be shorter (3/4") in height and you will get better tracking and easier to maneuver because you get more vertical surfaces to interface with the snow. Having only 2 skegs, one on each side means the downhill skegs is just flapping in the breeze without much snow push against. A series of them across the bottom give you uniform bite across the whole surface.

    Questions:
    Did you get the 7hp or 10hp model?
    Compact model?
    Is the include headlight worth anything?
    We bought the 10 HP Compact Model, the light is a dual LED is and is more than bright enough to groom with at night. I bring a spare light along mainly to use as a flashlight. Do you have any photos of the groom that you've use? The sled that comes with the unit has 4 or 5 runners on the bottom, and it does float a bit too well.

    Kinni Sport and Power in Riverfalls are selling these unit's for $2999 plus tax. This is for the 10 HP contact, with sled and seat (and beer holder)...

  35. #35
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    We don't have a picture of our groomer that shows the unit in any detail.

    Its very similar to the one shown here, at Black's Grove.

    https://twitter.com/BlackGroveRCR/st...55470000250880

    Instead of the plastic boat runners, we have skegs made with 3/4" angle iron.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    We don't have a picture of our groomer that shows the unit in any detail.

    Its very similar to the one shown here, at Black's Grove.

    https://twitter.com/BlackGroveRCR/st...55470000250880

    Instead of the plastic boat runners, we have skegs made with 3/4" angle iron.
    That drag is even being pulled by a Snowdog. Looks like a winner.

  37. #37
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    Is there a boxer style engine (like BMW motorcycle opposed cylinders) made that would work? Lower center of gravity.

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    it's a single cylinder engine, probably 2 strokes, so you can turn it any way you want. you'll have to refit everything then. not sure there is somethings to win.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    We don't have a picture of our groomer that shows the unit in any detail.

    Its very similar to the one shown here, at Black's Grove.

    https://twitter.com/BlackGroveRCR/st...55470000250880

    Instead of the plastic boat runners, we have skegs made with 3/4" angle iron.
    Do you have any better contact information for this club? Their website is not very helpful for contacts...

  40. #40
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    Yeah, they are no good at the web stuff.

    I have found their FB page to be the only way to get a hold of them consistently.

    https://www.facebook.com/RiverCrossingMountainBikeRace/

    Its a shame I'm a little booked up with other things. I'm designing a grooming system I plan on open-sourcing that would work for tracksleds, snowmobiles and Rokons.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    Yeah, they are no good at the web stuff.

    I have found their FB page to be the only way to get a hold of them consistently.

    https://www.facebook.com/RiverCrossingMountainBikeRace/

    Its a shame I'm a little booked up with other things. I'm designing a grooming system I plan on open-sourcing that would work for tracksleds, snowmobiles and Rokons.
    Awesome, can't wait to see what you build!

  42. #42
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    I'm curious what the COG is like on the sled dogs. I'm about 90% finished building my Intrak tracksled and am very pleased with how low the COG is, at least on flat level ground not running. Its pretty effortless to tip it over to a 45 deg or more angle in riding position behind with the steering pole and doesnt feel like it wants to tip over at all. Its super stable. That is with an empty tank of gas though, so we'll see how much difference 8 lbs of gas makes. May play with putting a large gas tank down low infront of the motor with a fuel pump that pumps fuel into a tiny tank above the tracks and recirculates back down into the low larger tank . Then the small tank above will gravity feed to the carb. That way if the fuel pump ever dies, you still have a very small tank on top that you can just manually fill to get home.

    I'm already designing my next model that will have the motor cylinder in a horizontal position which will get the engine mass and carb even lower and allow the machine to be quite a bit lower. I'm not sure its even necessary as the current prototype has such a low COG, but always have to improve regardless.

  43. #43
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    More pics please

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    Quote Originally Posted by blum585 View Post
    I'm somewhat suprised the snowdog has not gotten more traction as a groomer. I believe it's safe to say that one of these snowdogs will make it's way into western WI in the near future for grooming singletrack.

    The price is right for one of these, and as mentioned above it's nice to have a dealer backing. The design also looks spot on, which only makes sense as the Russians typically have to deal with lots of snow.

    As a bonus it appears this unit may work well for hauling equipment in the summer months.
    I'm picking one of these up and delivering it to a trail in northern WI today. If I get to see it in use maybe I'll be able to provide some feedback.

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    Again, I want to put a gentle reminder out there.

    There is some planning for a tracksled demo. The planning is in very early stages and may not happen. However, if you are in MN, WI, IA, ND or SD and are interested in the idea of a tracksled, PM me with your email address and I will add you to invite list.

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    Delivered a Snowdog to northern WI yesterday. Got a chance to try it out on some tight twisty single track. It works real well. Little bit of an arm workout but not that bad.

    The new owner was able to groom some trail that wasn't possible with the snowmobile.





    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    I'm curious what the COG is like on the sled dogs.
    I'm curious about that too. Though the Snowdog uses a 20" (500mm actually) track vs. the 15" ones the USA built ones are using. Based on our experience, a wider track should make it less tippy on off-camber turns.

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    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-15823353_10211520998808669_5473607376141465652_n.jpg

    just had my snowdog out this am... we got socked with 12 inches of new snow overnight. almost too much, had to break trail walking it in some deeper sections, others, the sled worked well.. I tossed on a pair of marquette fat skies and that helped getting through the deep stuff. after one pass , subsequent passes much easier.. I agree there is a learning curve, certainly making a stand up ride on grooming plate for it.

    center of gravity question... again learning curve. so deep today it was easy to start rolling over, but you can catch it, once a track is set, very little issue, I did have it start to go over and shut down.. but started back up with no issue. the quality of the build and thoughtful design is nice...https://youtu.be/0_kpKLde9t0

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    Hello folks.
    As we just found out that Fat bike racing activity is big time in USA couple weeks ago we began working on a special accessory for fat bike trail grooming based on our X-country ski trail groomer. We will not be able to provide them this year but some demo`s in February, but next year you will be able to purchase it before the season starts.

    Vlad Filatenko
    Snowdog team.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sndg View Post
    Hello folks.
    As we just found out that Fat bike racing activity is big time in USA couple weeks ago we began working on a special accessory for fat bike trail grooming based on our X-country ski trail groomer. We will not be able to provide them this year but some demo`s in February, but next year you will be able to purchase it before the season starts.

    Vlad Filatenko
    Snowdog team.
    My organization is interested in buying a Snowdog, but we'd really like it to come with a stand-on sled for grooming single track fat bike trails. If you can come up with a factory solution for this -- so we don't have to build our own -- it'd be excellent. If you offered a single track grooming package specifically, that'd be all the better.

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