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  1. #51
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    Hi sndg, could you show us the xc ski groomer?

  2. #52
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    I have been talking with a dealer for the snow dog in Canada He says he is having troubles with the carb and clutch freezing up on the 10 hp one. we are looking to get th 13 hp one. So he is holding off on selling it till that problem is resolved. Any one else have issues?

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbudell View Post
    I thought this was interesting: SNOWDOG CLUB Looks like the Russian Baltmotors tracksled is working on districbution in the US.
    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    Attachment 1113060

    just had my snowdog out this am... we got socked with 12 inches of new snow overnight. almost too much, had to break trail walking it in some deeper sections, others, the sled worked well.. I tossed on a pair of marquette fat skies and that helped getting through the deep stuff. after one pass , subsequent passes much easier.. I agree there is a learning curve, certainly making a stand up ride on grooming plate for it.

    center of gravity question... again learning curve. so deep today it was easy to start rolling over, but you can catch it, once a track is set, very little issue, I did have it start to go over and shut down.. but started back up with no issue. the quality of the build and thoughtful design is nice...https://youtu.be/0_kpKLde9t0

    Why would anyone buy or use one of these things? It looks like an ass backwards snowmobile. A regular snowmobile can do everything it can, much faster and more easily and then still be used for a ton of other things. You can tow whatever groomer attachment you like off the back of a snowmobile so I'm trying to understand why this machine even exists? It's cheap compared to new snowmobile, I'll give it that but plenty of good used work/utility snowmobiles can be bought for the same price and are actually easy to get parts for, can carry two people, and be used to haul somebody out if they are hurt back in the woods, keep the wind off you when riding it, etc, etc. This thing looks like a 1950's snowmobile design that never went anywhere because it is so impractical.

  4. #54
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    Because snowmobiles cannot fit on single track trails, add a groomer and you are limited to double track.

    The idea is having a machine that can be manipulated in tight areas, even turned around, by one person, which is necessary when grooming narrow and windy trails.

    Not to mention, snow mobiles are loud, fidgety, and hungry.

    Our state park went as far as to say no to snowmobiles, but yes to a Rokon.

    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    Why would anyone buy or use one of these things? It looks like an ass backwards snowmobile. A regular snowmobile can do everything it can, much faster and more easily and then still be used for a ton of other things. You can tow whatever groomer attachment you like off the back of a snowmobile so I'm trying to understand why this machine even exists? It's cheap compared to new snowmobile, I'll give it that but plenty of good used work/utility snowmobiles can be bought for the same price and are actually easy to get parts for, can carry two people, and be used to haul somebody out if they are hurt back in the woods, keep the wind off you when riding it, etc, etc. This thing looks like a 1950's snowmobile design that never went anywhere because it is so impractical.

  5. #55
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    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-sled.jpg

    This is my current project. It should be ready for field testing next week after final welding, aluminum decking, hood, and paint. Planning to bolt on the handlebar so that it can be moved if placed wrong.

  6. #56
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    This looks rad I want one Message me if it works!!




    Quote Originally Posted by Deadman View Post
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    This is my current project. It should be ready for field testing next week after final welding, aluminum decking, hood, and paint. Planning to bolt on the handlebar so that it can be moved if placed wrong.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbudell View Post
    I thought this was interesting: SNOWDOG CLUB Looks like the Russian Baltmotors tracksled is working on districbution in the US.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Because snowmobiles cannot fit on single track trails, add a groomer and you are limited to double track.

    The idea is having a machine that can be manipulated in tight areas, even turned around, by one person, which is necessary when grooming narrow and windy trails.

    Not to mention, snow mobiles are loud, fidgety, and hungry.

    Our state park went as far as to say no to snowmobiles, but yes to a Rokon.
    How wide are the trails you are trying to groom? Many snowmobiles can have their front ends narrowed up either with available adjustments or aftermarket front ends.

    Regarding noise, these gasoline engine powered track contraptions are going to make noise as well and very likely use carburetors. Modern sleds are fuel injected, can be had in either 2 or 4 strokes and are not at all figety. I bet a Ski-doo 600 ACE gets better mileage than the tracked lawnmower type machines I'm seeing in this thread.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak-rider View Post
    How wide are the trails you are trying to groom? Many snowmobiles can have their front ends narrowed up either with available adjustments or aftermarket front ends.

    Regarding noise, these gasoline engine powered track contraptions are going to make noise as well and very likely use carburetors. Modern sleds are fuel injected, can be had in either 2 or 4 strokes and are not at all figety. I bet a Ski-doo 600 ACE gets better mileage than the tracked lawnmower type machines I'm seeing in this thread.
    We're grooming 24" singletrack. A snowmobile is very limited to how narrow it can be made due to the wide engine and hood. It would take a lot of modification to even try and get a snowmobile less than 36" in width, and forget anything even close to 24".

    A tracksled is about half the weight of a snomobile and much easier to manuver, has double the floatation over deep snow, and can go many places a snowmobile wont fit, like between trees, under and over logs, etc. Snomobiles are also terrible for the beginning and end of season when the snowpack is minimal and rocks and roots are near the surface. Tracksleds are all season and can be ridden over rocks, roots, in sand, mud. Sometimes conditions are such that theres enough snow to pack a trail for fat biking, but too little to safely ride a snowmobile.

    They are also much simpler and easier to work on. Some of the Sleddog models are a bit heavy at 350 lbs, but my Intrak is around 250 lbs, and I can transport it on the back of a car in a hitch cargo carrier.

    I've ridden snowmobiles alot and for what they were built for theyre great. Not sure what fuel mileage the newest crop of sleds get, but the older used ones that are cheap and affordable get crap fuel economy, like 10 mpg or worse average. Just putting around a tracksled is going to be more fuel efficient, and with the proper exhaust, much quieter.

  9. #59
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    XC ski groomer

    This is what we use for Xski trail grooming. Scheme in PDF is under the link.
    Groomer is 9 inches wider than the track, coming up ti 29,33 inches wide.
    Snowdog track is 20` wide. I would be very thankful for the feedback, how wide of the trail groomer that will feet your needs the best ?

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-img_2896.jpgBest Tracksled Grooming Experience?-img_2897.jpgBest Tracksled Grooming Experience?-img_2898.jpg

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bw...1VWWHlBLUYxMXM
    Quote Originally Posted by dudeist View Post
    Hi sndg, could you show us the xc ski groomer?

  10. #60
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    That looks great, Snowdog. Thanks. Do you sell them and how mucho$$? We would probably want only 20-24 inches wide. Our bike trails are narrow and have lots of trees and rocks on the sides. (and in the middle) . Probably should taper the front a bit so it doesn't get caught on stumps and rocks. Others may want more width, but I'm curious how that works. I guess one needs a little overlap for the corners. Some trails will need reroutes or added B-lines for a machine anyway.

  11. #61
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    First shipments of XC ski groomer will be available in USA this February. But I have got few suggestion how to improve it from Cuyuna Lakes Mountain Bike for Fat bike trail grooming and we are making something very convenient for use and factory manufactured. I am hoping to fit into $450-600 MSRP price.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadman View Post
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    This is my current project. It should be ready for field testing next week after final welding, aluminum decking, hood, and paint. Planning to bolt on the handlebar so that it can be moved if placed wrong.
    Looks good! I was originally thinking of going that route, and just putting a motor ontop of a complete snowmobile track and skid, but wanted to try and in-track motor design. Where did you get the CV clutch, is it one for a go kart off ebay? I've been eyeing those to possibly try on my next build.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sndg View Post
    This is what we use for Xski trail grooming. Scheme in PDF is under the link.
    Groomer is 9 inches wider than the track, coming up ti 29,33 inches wide.
    Snowdog track is 20` wide. I would be very thankful for the feedback, how wide of the trail groomer that will feet your needs the best ?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bw...1VWWHlBLUYxMXM
    Desired width can vary depending on preference. Some fat bikers like narrow 24" trails and others like wider 30-36" wide. I would suggest making the groomer 24" wide and then making some side attachments that can bolt or clip on the sides to make the groom wider when desired. That way, when grooming if you wanted certain sections of trail wider or narrower, it would just be a matter of adding or removing a couple side attachments.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sndg View Post
    This is what we use for Xski trail grooming. Scheme in PDF is under the link.
    Groomer is 9 inches wider than the track, coming up ti 29,33 inches wide.
    Snowdog track is 20` wide. I would be very thankful for the feedback, how wide of the trail groomer that will feet your needs the best ?

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1113449Click image for larger version. 

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    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bw...1VWWHlBLUYxMXM
    I've put about 15 hours in on the snowdog now for grooming very narrow old school hand built single track. There is no way another machine such as a standard snowmobile could even come close to fitting into the locations that the snowdog fits.

    With this being said, the width of the track is all the wider a drag / grooming attachment should be, any wider and it would not fit between the trees or rocks on our trails. So far I've been using the sled that comes with the snowdog, but will soon be building a drag similar to the drag used a Black's Grove MN. Having a snow comb on the back would be nice, along with having something that will help level / cut up ice.

    regardless myself and others in my area really appreicate that a machine like the snowdog was designed and built as without out it we would not have groomed single track!

  15. #65
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    Yes, the clutch is a Comet knockoff. Some in our group think a hydrostatic drive from a lawn mower is the direction. It would be nice to have reverse and variable speed at full power.

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    Watch those Comet knockoffs. They will go SPLAT! on you. Drop the extra coin for a real Comet, you won't regret it.

    You don't need a transmission. Grooming is done at fast walking speed, depending on the size of engine, it will be about 3/8 to 1/2 throttle, max.

    If you make it light enough (as close as you can to 200lbs), you will find you don't need reverse. Just pull the unit backwards.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    Watch those Comet knockoffs. They will go SPLAT! on you. Drop the extra coin for a real Comet, you won't regret it.

    You don't need a transmission. Grooming is done at fast walking speed, depending on the size of engine, it will be about 3/8 to 1/2 throttle, max.

    If you make it light enough (as close as you can to 200lbs), you will find you don't need reverse. Just pull the unit backwards.
    In this regard, I really like the 5 spd tranny with the auto clutch with the 3 wheeler motor. The gearing is so low I can start in 4th gear from a dead start no problem. I find that just leaving it in 2nd or 3rd gear is plenty fast so no need to even shift gears at all. But its nice to have the option depending on what I'm using the machine for. 1st gear is way low and really useful for snow plowing or pulling heavy loads. I built it primarily for grooming, but it is a multi use machine.

    I'll post a more detailed report in my Intrak build thread, with my observations. The biggest thing I noticed is it does take a lot of effort to steer the thing, but there's a lot of room for optimization such as changing underside track profile, increase leverage etc. The COG is low, but my machine would still be a handful for a small person to manuver. I dont think theres anyway around having to build much smaller tracksleds for smaller people.

    Once I get the steering dialed in, I'll be happy with the tracksled.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    You mean like this one?

    Attachment 1111960
    This looks ideal. I assume the fold out wings are angled to chamfer the sideslopes? Have you built any of these and if not would you be able to send a .dxf file of this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    This looks ideal. I assume the fold out wings are angled to chamfer the sideslopes? Have you built any of these and if not would you be able to send a .dxf file of this?
    This actually the "old" version. It's based on the first groom we had with the improvements we wished for. I'm working on a new one that will be modular. It will be designed to work with tracksleds, snowmobiles, Rokons, and everything inbetween.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    This actually the "old" version. It's based on the first groom we had with the improvements we wished for. I'm working on a new one that will be modular. It will be designed to work with tracksleds, snowmobiles, Rokons, and everything inbetween.
    This sounds great, looking forward to see your groomer design.

  21. #71
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    Snow Dog looks like a good solution, following this thread for more info. We are ready to buy a groomer for fat bike riding as soon as we get some snow.
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by sick4surf View Post
    Snow Dog looks like a good solution, following this thread for more info. We are ready to buy a groomer for fat bike riding as soon as we get some snow.
    Suggestion: Buy your groomer before the snow hits. Once the snow falls you'll want to get on it, not start shopping and find a week/month/whatever lead time.

    We (cramba.org) bought our groomer and snowmobile in autumn, then when snow came to SE Michigan last year we got things done. It's been great! (Wildcat groomer and small sno-scoot-like snowmobile.)

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by belterskelter View Post
    I have been talking with a dealer for the snow dog in Canada He says he is having troubles with the carb and clutch freezing up on the 10 hp one. we are looking to get th 13 hp one. So he is holding off on selling it till that problem is resolved. Any one else have issues?
    I have the 10 hp. compact.. no problems so far,

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by c0nsumer View Post
    Suggestion: Buy your groomer before the snow hits. Once the snow falls you'll want to get on it, not start shopping and find a week/month/whatever lead time.

    We (cramba.org) bought our groomer and snowmobile in autumn, then when snow came to SE Michigan last year we got things done. It's been great! (Wildcat groomer and small sno-scoot-like snowmobile.)
    yes, to the above.... having it ready to go and keeping on top of each snowfall sounds like the key to having a good season...as I stated previously mine arrived day after 12 inches of new fell on top of about 8-10 base, then 55 degrees and an inch of rain, now back to 18 degrees. taking more work to get the trails packed down,, but I believe at least for our trails, this will be the best solution...(still working on a standup groomer to ride on)

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by twright205 View Post
    ...(still working on a standup groomer to ride on)
    Mine is due to arrive Monday. Please post pics of what you end up with for a grooming sled. I have a bunch of scrap steel and am going to start cobbing something together.

    Can you give me dimensions of the hitch? It looks like a mini-pintle hitch?

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    Curious what people are using for insurance when grooming using tracksleds that do not require a license plate. Snowmachines with license plates are way to provide insurance (at least in Canada).

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    guess if your land manager allows lawnmowers, weed whackers, or chainsaws perhaps.. tracksled is ok, kind of like on same level or a motorized wheelbarrow

    that's one of the perks for me, no reg. no insurance no need to have a trailer.. plus with 20 inch track packs a nice size swath..

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    or lawn Tractor.

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by hehnerca View Post
    Curious what people are using for insurance when grooming using tracksleds that do not require a license plate. Snowmachines with license plates are way to provide insurance (at least in Canada).
    I have checked with ICBC and the track sled does not need to be registered, that is for bc, alberta, sask, and manitoba. that is all i know so far.
    Our organization still is going to be getting liability insurance to cover, trails society and land owners and directors and volunteers. we just put our money down on a 13 hp snow dog today!!!! so cool things will be happening in Rossland

  30. #80
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    A quick note from those considering any type of tracksled.

    Length and weight are the two determining factors on the maneuverability of tracksleds. I know its tempting to go all 'Merica and go bigger, but the heavier you go, the more muscle powered required to move the machine. The longer you go, the further you have to move the bars to get a tight turning radius. When you combine long and heavy, you need your He-man volunteers to use it.

    The big advantage of tracksled, beside cost and narrowness, is that (at least with smaller/lighter variety) they are easy enough to maneuver that volunteers (teenagers, smaller women, etc.) that may not have strength to manhandle a snowmobile or Rokon down singletrack can now groom. By going long and heavy, you negate that advantage.

    If someone approached me and asked me describe the perfect tracksled based on our 2yrs of experience, it would 36" to 48" long, 6hp to 9hp and have weight at or below 200lbs.

  31. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sndg View Post
    This is what we use for Xski trail grooming. Scheme in PDF is under the link.
    Groomer is 9 inches wider than the track, coming up ti 29,33 inches wide.
    Snowdog track is 20` wide. I would be very thankful for the feedback, how wide of the trail groomer that will feet your needs the best ?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bw...1VWWHlBLUYxMXM
    I think a 20"-24" sled trail laid down by a 1.25" lugged track is perfect, no additional grooming required. That said, there's a lot of "bike" trail a skandic will never be able to negotiate like your Snow Dog could.
    What's the machine behind you in the last pic? It looks like something different. Thanks
    Last edited by Johanneson; 01-09-2017 at 02:39 AM.

  32. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadman View Post
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    This is my current project. It should be ready for field testing next week after final welding, aluminum decking, hood, and paint. Planning to bolt on the handlebar so that it can be moved if placed wrong.
    You're probably going to need a track with taller lugs, I've seen where anything less than 1 3/4" lugs spins up easily.
    Mongoose product development

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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    A quick note from those considering any type of tracksled.

    Length and weight are the two determining factors on the maneuverability of tracksleds. I know its tempting to go all 'Merica and go bigger, but the heavier you go, the more muscle powered required to move the machine. The longer you go, the further you have to move the bars to get a tight turning radius. When you combine long and heavy, you need your He-man volunteers to use it.

    The big advantage of tracksled, beside cost and narrowness, is that (at least with smaller/lighter variety) they are easy enough to maneuver that volunteers (teenagers, smaller women, etc.) that may not have strength to manhandle a snowmobile or Rokon down singletrack can now groom. By going long and heavy, you negate that advantage.

    If someone approached me and asked me describe the perfect tracksled based on our 2yrs of experience, it would 36" to 48" long, 6hp to 9hp and have weight at or below 200lbs.
    thanks for the info.
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  34. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    A quick note from those considering any type of tracksled.

    Length and weight are the two determining factors on the maneuverability of tracksleds. I know its tempting to go all 'Merica and go bigger, but the heavier you go, the more muscle powered required to move the machine. The longer you go, the further you have to move the bars to get a tight turning radius. When you combine long and heavy, you need your He-man volunteers to use it.

    The big advantage of tracksled, beside cost and narrowness, is that (at least with smaller/lighter variety) they are easy enough to maneuver that volunteers (teenagers, smaller women, etc.) that may not have strength to manhandle a snowmobile or Rokon down singletrack can now groom. By going long and heavy, you negate that advantage.

    If someone approached me and asked me describe the perfect tracksled based on our 2yrs of experience, it would 36" to 48" long, 6hp to 9hp and have weight at or below 200lbs.
    I would have to agree with this assesment, that if one's primary use of the tracksled will be grooming using volunteers, a smaller lighter machine is better. The smaller machines will struggle in non-grooming use such as pulling a cargo sled through deep snow. Also, for heavy snowfall, and neglected trails a larger machine with a longer track and taller lugs is going to be much more effective, at the expense of greater effort/strenght expense.

    IMO, the ideal situation is to have one of each, but if grooming is the primary use and only one machine can be had, I'd say get the smaller 6-9 hp machine and stay on top of grooming from the start of the season. I have an old honda 5.5 gpx160 generator motor lying around I think I'm going to build another one with, with about a 3' track footprint, and see how light I can make it. It'll be one speed, no transmission, just a centifugal clutch. I will use a longer lugged track something around 1.5"-1.75".

  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    I have an old honda 5.5 gpx160 generator motor lying around I think I'm going to build another one with, with about a 3' track footprint, and see how light I can make it. It'll be one speed, no transmission, just a centifugal clutch. I will use a longer lugged track something around 1.5"-1.75".
    Something like a Technomaster maybe?

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-technomaster-ruff-tm-02.jpg

  36. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    Something like a Technomaster maybe?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yeah, I'd like to build something like that, thats along the lines of what I'm thinking. Your suggestions have convinced me thats a good option to explore.

  37. #87
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    Where did you guys find that Tecnomaster thing?
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    I found pictures of this one on Unusual Locomotion.

    Technomaster is the distributor for Ruff. The new Ruff models look all 1950s with curves and cherry/cream paintjobs.

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-minisnegohod-yersh-02_534x400.jpg

    The Russians have all manner of snow machines, from the Мотобуксировщик (lit. "motor snow dogs"), which we call tracksleds to mini and micro snowmobiles. Some of seen the Fisher 2MP or my favorite the SnowFly (picture below).

    Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-show-fly-02_534x400.jpg

    If you want ideas and can read through Google Translate or have someone that can read/speak Russian, take a look at motodog.ru . They have forums, include DIY build forums with pictures. If you want to see what machines are purchasable in Stalin's neighborhood, check out master-tehno.ru .

  39. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by skota23 View Post
    Where did you guys find that Tecnomaster thing?
    I posted this on page 1 of this thread and may have found it from a link CycleKrieg posted earlier. Cool stuff in it: ONE, 2 OR 3 TRACKED RIGID VEHICLES, LIGHT

  40. #90
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    awesome, thanks
    Mongoose product development

  41. #91
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    I bought a Snowdog 10hp compact, along with the sled and seat. Demo'd one, made sure it fit in the back of my Subaru, and bought it. Will work on grooming this weekend!
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAGI410 View Post
    I bought a Snowdog 10hp compact, along with the sled and seat. Demo'd one, made sure it fit in the back of my Subaru, and bought it. Will work on grooming this weekend!
    I bought the same set-up and have done just a few test runs around my property. Unfortunately we have a hard & sketchy crust that is not really groomable at the present time. The thing is going to be fun! I'm going to try hauling some sizable rock slabs to a wet spot on a snowmobile trail for armoring in the spring. Need to build a stone boat to haul them on first.

    How about that steel shipping frame? That thing is awesome and will become a project in itself. Not sure what I'm going to turn it into yet...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Tracksled Grooming Experience?-snowdog-package-2-large-.jpg  


  43. #93
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    I picked mine up from a dealer, so I missed out on the steel frame! Groomed about 3.5 miles tonight. That little headlight on there is plenty bright, but I supplemented it with my helmet light as well.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  44. #94
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    This is the track that came with the skid as a $15 package. Once the thing is proven to run I will change it to a more aggressive track. It will only take about 30 minutes total to change. It should run by Monday!

  45. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadman View Post
    This is the track that came with the skid as a $15 package. Once the thing is proven to run I will change it to a more aggressive track. It will only take about 30 minutes total to change. It should run by Monday!
    If you are just using the machine for grooming, the track you have should be fine. If you are wanting to also use the machine to play in deep snow, you'll probably want a more aggressive track and a bigger motor.
    I built mine for grooming, but now that it's running and I've experienced how awesome these machines are in and of themselves, tracksleds and using them as utility/exploration/fun machines is turning into a winter activity on its own, not to replace fat biking of course though.

    Here's a vid of mine in 2' plus deep snow. My track is same as yours and does ok. More aggressive would be better though.

    https://youtu.be/ipTiJd1bsAo

  46. #96
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    The tracksled continues to impress me!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCFlmrWaCTA

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    Fun in and of itself!
    But how does it compact/groom? After 1 or 2 passes shown above can you bike the tread?

  48. #98
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    ...

  49. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by bme107 View Post
    Fun in and of itself!
    But how does it compact/groom? After 1 or 2 passes shown above can you bike the tread?
    Not with a big high floatation sled behind it. Also, number of passes doesnt matter, the first pass compresses the snow as much as its going to, and addition passes wont compress it any more unless you add weight to the machine and sled or decrease the footprint. I'll be making a much smaller footprint groomer to stand on that will compress the snow enough to bike on.

    This is just a generalization, good hard snow packing depends on variables such as snow consistency, temperature, etc. White fluffy sugary snow does not pack well. Slushy snow does not pack well. Some kinds of wet dense snow do pack very well though.

    Generally, you're never going to be able to make a pass and then bike right away. The groomed trail needs to set up for a while, overnight is usual. With the right wetter snow conditions, I have had the high floatation black sled in the video make a track that overnight set up super hard and was perfect for biking, but generally, you don't want high floatation for grooming.

  50. #100
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    first try in Rossland BC

    this was our first test on the 13 hp snowdog !! and it worked great with the ghetto drag that we made out of old skis and what ever we could scavenge


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