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  1. #1
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    BB7 brakes and steel frame

    They're good enough for this guy, so what's your excuse?

    Great Lakes Fat Bike Series Champion – Jorden Wakeley’s 616 Race Bike | FAT-BIKE.COM
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  2. #2
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Wah wah wah, I need carbon everything, I cannot POSSIBLY expect to be ACTUALLY competitive unless my fatbike weighs less than a 6 pack of tallboys, and has fewer metal components than a tupperware bowl of jello......

    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Wah wah wah, I need carbon everything, I cannot POSSIBLY expect to be ACTUALLY competitive unless my fatbike weighs less than a 6 pack of tallboys, and has fewer metal components than a tupperware bowl of jello......

    LOL...I LOVE your sig line!
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  4. #4
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    Fabian Cancellara, riding an out of tune thrift-store huffy, could probably destroy my best time anywhere. There's a guy who does the Furnace Creek 508 (that's 508 miles, not K) on a beat up raleigh fixie. There are people for whom the bike really doesn't matter.

    For the rest of us, let us have our illusions that we can buy performance.

  5. #5
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    I have just as much fun on my carbon Tallboy as I do on my steel Moonlander.
    Actually, I suck on both,but, still have fun.
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Moonlander

  6. #6
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    I'm not sure the picture at the bottom of him dragging his foot to slow down is the greatest endorsement of BB7's

  7. #7
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    the dude's legs look as skinny as mine.. how does he do it?

  8. #8
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    Didn't purchase my Beargrease 'cause I need to be faster because most of my riding buddies can kick my behind even if they had 50 lbs of dead weight tied to their Pugsley's. I've never owned a carbon bike & since I love fatbikes it just felt right to pull the trigger on the BG. Carbon is cool, but so is steel & other such things
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    I'm not sure the picture at the bottom of him dragging his foot to slow down is the greatest endorsement of BB7's
    Doesn't it look like his rear wheel is washing out? His front wheel appears to be more vertical than the rear. Maybe approaching a RH turn? I'm not sure any kind of brake would be good to apply in that situation and at that time. Best left to a foot dab.
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  10. #10
    Nuts
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    A friend of mine has a 616 and it comes in @ 27 pounds about the same as my Yampa. The difference is mine is obese and the 616 is racing size skinny fat. I would've never thought the fat bike forum would turn their noses up so much at a carbon bike. I like running obese and carbon was a way I could do it and keep the weight down.
    And I love beer!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    A friend of mine has a 616 and it comes in @ 27 pounds about the same as my Yampa. The difference is mine is obese and the 616 is racing size skinny fat. I would've never thought the fat bike forum would turn their noses up so much at a carbon bike. I like running obese and carbon was a way I could do it and keep the weight down.
    I'm certainly not trying to give the impression of turning my nose up at carbon. I was more so just showing how even the most "primitive" of frame material and disc brakes can be good enough for the elite. I still lust for a carbon Beargrease to compliment my steel Moonlander!
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by marathon marke View Post
    I'm certainly not trying to give the impression of turning my nose up at carbon. I was more so just showing how even the most "primitive" of frame material and disc brakes can be good enough for the elite. I still lust for a carbon Beargrease to compliment my steel Moonlander!
    It's not news that the bike does not make the champion

    So one step further, single speed, coaster brakes and 40ish pounds.

    And I love beer!!

  13. #13
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    The foot dab is due to a 180 right hander after a fast downhill. Don't let the legs fool ya, I'm still 185-190ish. My 616 is a bit over 27 lbs with Sarma Naran wheels.

    Jorden
    Live slow, Race fast!

  14. #14
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    way to go Jordan - you're killing it all over Michigan and beyond. Looking forward to the VASA in a couple weeks .. hilly fun. BB7s rock in the snow.
    GET Bret Weir, I said.

  15. #15
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    BB7 brakes and steel frame-image.jpg

    My steel 616 w/ Avid BB7's that bdundee mentioned in a previous post...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTB23 View Post
    The foot dab is due to a 180 right hander after a fast downhill. Don't let the legs fool ya, I'm still 185-190ish. My 616 is a bit over 27 lbs with Sarma Naran wheels.

    Jorden
    Well, there ya have it, folks. Steel and BB7 can rock and roll!

    Incredible work there, Jorden!
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  17. #17
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    I love steel bikes! It is all I own. But I never broken the top 200 in any race I entered... and I have bb7s on the pugs.... but am still slow...

    Sent from my SM-T310 using Tapatalk
    My bike is heavier than yours - it does not have Carbon or Titanium parts - I love it!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by marathon marke View Post
    Well, there ya have it, folks. Steel and BB7 can rock and roll!

    Incredible work there, Jorden!
    Not that it would make any difference because I'm sure he would've won anyways but you do know he has carbon wheels right? Just kind of ironic is all.
    And I love beer!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    Not that it would make any difference because I'm sure he would've won anyways but you do know he has carbon wheels right? Just kind of ironic is all.
    I know, I know. So he has carbon wheels. And he could have a carbon frame if he wanted to. But he doesn't.

    Now how about those awesome BB7s, hey?
    - Mark Ehlers
    The Prodigal Cyclist

  20. #20
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    I sometimes wonder if my negative opinions on BB7s are due to the fact that I was not riding them recreationally, but on a commuter.

    To me they're a rapidly wearing pad (regardless of compound) with rotors that were very, very loud regardless of which method I used to deshriek them. I found the constant adjustments tedious, and did not personally like the knobs.

    But on a commuter you've got the miles adding up a lot faster, at much higher speeds (factor in decelerating my fat self as well) in an environment filled with toxic street goop instead of relatively basic muds and sands.

    Seems like it's not really the environment the standard BB7 is designed for. My Shimano CX-77s are SLIGHTLY less powerful, but the silence, smoothness and straightforward adjustments (which thus far are less often) are extremely satisfying.

    I'm not going on a Shimano vs Avid tirade, we are each entitled to our own opinions there. But I do believe that it has to be, at least in part... A matter of having the right tool for the Job.

    And given how many different calipers are now made under the "Avid BB7" moniker (at least 3, right? a road, a mountain and a lightweight one?) it may be easier to understand the wide range of opinions on a single brake.

    on the other thing. Steel is awesome. Steel is always awesome. I've loved plenty of aluminum bikes. But Steel is awesome.

  21. #21
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    BB7 brakes and steel frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    I sometimes wonder if my negative opinions on BB7s are due to the fact that I was not riding them recreationally, but on a commuter.

    To me they're a rapidly wearing pad (regardless of compound) with rotors that were very, very loud regardless of which method I used to deshriek them. I found the constant adjustments tedious, and did not personally like the knobs.

    But on a commuter you've got the miles adding up a lot faster, at much higher speeds (factor in decelerating my fat self as well) in an environment filled with toxic street goop instead of relatively basic muds and sands.

    Seems like it's not really the environment the standard BB7 is designed for. My Shimano CX-77s are SLIGHTLY less powerful, but the silence, smoothness and straightforward adjustments (which thus far are less often) are extremely satisfying.

    I'm not going on a Shimano vs Avid tirade, we are each entitled to our own opinions there. But I do believe that it has to be, at least in part... A matter of having the right tool for the Job.

    And given how many different calipers are now made under the "Avid BB7" moniker (at least 3, right? a road, a mountain and a lightweight one?) it may be easier to understand the wide range of opinions on a single brake.

    on the other thing. Steel is awesome. Steel is always awesome. I've loved plenty of aluminum bikes. But Steel is awesome.
    The Avid branded pads are crap. Use EBC Golds. Every brake--disc, rim, drum, coaster--is noisy sometimes, and the noise can come and go during a ride.

    The great thing about BB7s is they are so adjustable, so you can get the feel you like.
    The bad thing is they are so adjustable, so you can really screw them up if you do not understand how they work.

    The "lightweight" version is exactly the same as the standard brake, except for using some ti bolts and pads with aluminum backing plates. All to lose a few grams and add hugely to the price, especially since you do not really want to use the pads in the first place.
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  22. #22
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    I understand how they work. heck, I even understand the science behind how they work.

    I've heard a lot of feedback from people that mix the EBC gold pads with SLX rotors (Or any other modern shimano rotor) and get the best of everything. the BB7 power, the shimano quiet, and getting to use the caliper they know best.

    As a commuter I will still pick the CX-77. there is only one way to adjust them, and it requires allens. more than a few times I've had people play with my BB7 knobs. (I don't think Co-workers realize how much of a hassle they can create by just "looking at it")

    All in all, a brake that requires you to buy pads from a different company, that seems to have the most success with their competitors rotors and sets up in a way I just personally don't like... is not right for me.

    My CX-77s do me just fine. original pads and SLX rotors, silent, low maintenance and worry free. the slight reduction in power has not been a worry yet, but depending on other peoples needs. would be the one concern.

    I mean, this is the fat bike forum IN a Mountain Bike forum. I imagine the amount of power the brake has would be a lot more important than the maintenance. given where and when these bikes are getting ridden.

  23. #23
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    BB7 brakes and steel frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    I understand how they work. heck, I even understand the science behind how they work.

    I've heard a lot of feedback from people that mix the EBC gold pads with SLX rotors (Or any other modern shimano rotor) and get the best of everything. the BB7 power, the shimano quiet, and getting to use the caliper they know best.

    As a commuter I will still pick the CX-77. there is only one way to adjust them, and it requires allens. more than a few times I've had people play with my BB7 knobs. (I don't think Co-workers realize how much of a hassle they can create by just "looking at it")

    All in all, a brake that requires you to buy pads from a different company, that seems to have the most success with their competitors rotors and sets up in a way I just personally don't like... is not right for me.

    My CX-77s do me just fine. original pads and SLX rotors, silent, low maintenance and worry free. the slight reduction in power has not been a worry yet, but depending on other peoples needs. would be the one concern.

    I mean, this is the fat bike forum IN a Mountain Bike forum. I imagine the amount of power the brake has would be a lot more important than the maintenance. given where and when these bikes are getting ridden.
    Since 2000 the only issue I have ever had with BBDB/BB7s is with the pads, which are a wear item, so I do not care.

    I have great results with the stock rotors (avoid G3--too narrow), though I do have a couple of other brands I like.

    I can not help that your "friends" can not keep their hands to themselves, but it not like they are readjusting the mounting bolts.
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  24. #24
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    Who said friends? I said co-workers.

    Many, many people have horrible experiences with these brakes. there is no denying that, and given how affordable hydraulics have become, I don't know anyone who still feels the need to mountain bike on them.

    that being said, my original post in this thread is simply to admit, that Avid BB7 mountains (with 3 different sets of rotors over the years, two of which were G3s) May have failed for me simply because they were being asked to do a task that is not in line with what they were designed for.

    add to that, most people I know that hate BB7's rode them on commuters. I don't hear as much negative feedback on them in the MTB world.

    I mean, I still do. mostly for noise. but I hear less.

  25. #25
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    BB7 brakes and steel frame

    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    Who said friends? I said co-workers.

    Many, many people have horrible experiences with these brakes. there is no denying that, and given how affordable hydraulics have become, I don't know anyone who still feels the need to mountain bike on them.

    that being said, my original post in this thread is simply to admit, that Avid BB7 mountains (with 3 different sets of rotors over the years, two of which were G3s) May have failed for me simply because they were being asked to do a task that is not in line with what they were designed for.

    add to that, most people I know that hate BB7's rode them on commuters. I don't hear as much negative feedback on them in the MTB world.

    I mean, I still do. mostly for noise. but I hear less.
    You used the wrong rotors. The G3 brake track is too narrow.

    I have and so use BB7s for everything from trail to freeride to commuting. All works the same. Very well.

    But you prefer something else, fine.
    mtbtires.com
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