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  1. #1
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    Argus: A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly

    The Argus is said to be Mongoose's "real" fatbike.

    Alloy frame, Juggernaut tires, 180mm brakes, sealed BB and 27 speeds.

    It **even** comes in 3 sizes.

    Recently, Nashbar had the Mongoose Argus on sale for $449 with free shipping.

    I grabbed one for a backup bike and it arrived today.

    ------> Jump forward to Argus Expert assembly:

    Argus: A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-argus2.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 09-28-2016 at 01:47 PM.

  2. #2
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    Got mine today too. Great bike for the money. I feel like a kid again.

  3. #3
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    Here is the Left side of the bike:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-argusl.jpg  


  4. #4
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    Here is the Argus fresh from the destroyed box (thank you UPS).

    No double boxing or tracking number from Nashbar, but the bike did arrive in 3 working days.

    After building 3 Dolomites and 2 Porters for my LBS (Iron Horse Porter VS. Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)) it was refreshing to see the forks pretty well protected.

    33lbs said the bathroom scale.

    Frame and Forks were wrapped in pipe foam:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-1.jpg  


  5. #5
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    Here is the Saddle and alloy Post.

    Nice scale along the backside allowing you to quickly set up without having to scratch your measurements into the Post.

    Saddle has nice looking stitching and is very lightweight.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-2.jpg  


  6. #6
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    Scale along the Saddle Rails:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-3.jpg  


  7. #7
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    Funny warning sticker not to mount the Rear Reflector too low:

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-4.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-5.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Long neck
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-6.jpg  


  9. #9
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    Remember: never ride at night
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-7.jpg  


  10. #10
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    Looks very nice for that price. My first fatty (SE F@E) looked very similar, though yours looks nicer and you got it for half the price.

  11. #11
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    Inside the Goodie Box:

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-8.jpg

    The included manual did not have any information pertaining to the Argus, but fortunately, there were a bunch of Shamano pamphlets about the bike's features.

  12. #12
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    You can't peel the graphics off, because they are under the clearcoat

    De-badgers everywhere are weeping
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-9.jpg  


  13. #13
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    Front Brake from above:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-10.jpg  


  14. #14
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    Fork had some lubrication, but I like to really pack in the grease to keep water out.


    Fork off:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11.jpg  


  15. #15
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    I'm feeling a little better about the SE now... as it came with hydros, instead of mechanical disc brakes. But your Argus came with pedals!

  16. #16
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    Thanks for the report.

    I probably have some bias because the people who do that bike are members of our community and ride posse but they really are passionate about it and try very hard for good stuff at a low price. Their being good citizens extends to their doing trail work near their office, and helping their home IMBA chapter.

    The 2017 Argus with Bluto looks really nice.

  17. #17
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    Here you can see, that just in shipping, the black paint has worn off the cup.

    Wipe out all the factory grease (and paint flakes).

    Soak the bearings in Turpentine to remove all the grease and flakes.

    Repack the bearings with fresh grease. Really pack it in there.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-12.jpg  


  18. #18
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    Head properly greased and put together
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-13.jpg  


  19. #19
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    Handlebar installed
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-14.jpg  


  20. #20
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    Great looking TIG welds, and lots of attachment points.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-15.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Front Hub with rubber dust cap removed
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-16.jpg  


  22. #22
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    Not much grease from the factory.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-17.jpg

    Bed the bearings in a nice layer of grease.

    It will keep water out, and hold the bearings in place during assembly.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-18.jpg

    In typical China bike fashion, both the front and rear hubs had the Cones cranked down way too tight from the factory.

    The rear hub was so tight, I could not turn it with my fingers.

    DO NOT ride this bike (not even down the driveway) until you adjust the front and rear Cones - or damage will result.

    How to adjust Cones:

    Iron Horse Porter VS. Mongoose Dolomite - (they are not the same bike after all)

  23. #23
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    Drop and Derailleur
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-19.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 08-12-2016 at 12:40 PM.

  24. #24
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    Cassette
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-20.jpg  


  25. #25
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    The rear hub uses a spacer washer between the Cone and Lock Nut.

    Don't forget to put it back in it's proper place after repacking the grease!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-21.jpg  


  26. #26
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    Vid1900: Outstanding tutorial on prepping a bike out of the box; here and on your Iron Horse vs Mongoose thread!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTowpathTraveler View Post
    Vid1900: Outstanding tutorial on prepping a bike out of the box; here and on your Iron Horse vs Mongoose thread!
    Thank you, sir!

  28. #28
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    Rear brake
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-22.jpg  


  29. #29
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    You want to put some No-Ox on the threads of the BB, so that the aluminum does not corrode permanently to the bearing assembly.

    First, remove the crank bolt:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-23.jpg  


  30. #30
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    Nice write up and nice bike!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Remember: never ride at night
    Good thing my bike didn't come with that sticker... I'd hate to break the law.
    I like turtles

  32. #32
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    Bravo Vid!
    Mongoose product development

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    Continuing to remove the BB:

    Next we remove the crank arms with a Puller Tool
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-1.jpg  


  34. #34
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    Now using a Bottom Bracket tool, we remove the Left side.

    The Left side is standard threading, so turn the tool CCW.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-2.jpg  


  35. #35
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    On the Right side (the chain side), the threads of the BB are REVERSE THREADED.

    So turn the BB tool CW to remove.

    Here you can see the BB Bearing:

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-3.jpg

    You can also see in the picture that the Front Derailleur mounting bracket is mounted using the BB Bearing.

  36. #36
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    After removing the BB Bearing, we need to COMPLETELY clean out the threads of any metal shavings or crud.

    This Argus was completely clean (Yea Mongoose!), but that does not mean yours will be.

    Use an old toothbrush or Brass Brush to scrub the threads, and then blast it out with your Air Compressor (apartment dwellers, use Canned Air).

    The No-Ox keeps the Aluminum frame from permanently corroding to the steel BB parts.

    Dissimilar metals do crazy things when they get wet.

    Put the No-Ox on both the Aluminum and the Steel threads.

    When you reassemble, the parts will go together like butter.

    Here you can see the Aluminum threads completely slathered with No-Ox:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-4.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 08-12-2016 at 11:32 AM.

  37. #37
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    Finally, before you reinstall the Arms, make sure you lightly grease the square part of the axle.

    This will allow you to easily remove the Arms for future service.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-6.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 08-12-2016 at 11:28 AM.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by rentalrider View Post
    Nice write up and nice bike!
    Quote Originally Posted by skota23 View Post
    Bravo Vid!

    Thank you both

  39. #39
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    Basically looks like my vinson did but with better components. Cool bike.

  40. #40
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    Here is the Front Derailleur
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-7.jpg  


  41. #41
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    Front Derailleur Lever
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-8.jpg  


  42. #42
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    Great thread! Subscribed!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  43. #43
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    The Argus looks to be pretty much exactly like the Vinson with the exception of a few minor parts. The front derailleur is crap from the get go. using an e-type with that anti-rotation notch doesn't work well long term. I switched to a problem solvers mount and a direct mount FD. I liked my Vinson a lot more after I switched it to 10 speed with X5 shifters, X7 FD and X9 RD. The best upgrade was Avid brake levers and good cables and housings. The stock mech brakes weren't all that bad actually. For me the aluminum forks, QRs and Weinmann rims were its biggest drawbacks. By the time I costed out a carbon fork, and new wheels, I just decided it would be best to give it a good new home and start over.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowride454 View Post
    The Argus looks to be pretty much exactly like the Vinson with the exception of a few minor parts.
    Exactly.

    The Argus is just a fancy version of the Vinson.

    Better brakes, more gears, better tires, better post, better paint.


    Quote Originally Posted by slowride454 View Post
    By the time I costed out a carbon fork, and new wheels, I just decided it would be best to give it a good new home and start over.
    Yeah, trying to upgrade an inexpensive bike can quickly become a money pit, lol.

  45. #45
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    Good job!

    I like this bike, but I'd rather have it as a 1x9, not 3x9.
    Also, does anyone know if there are suitable fenders for fatbikes like this?

    BTW, amazing thread. Just a good, old-fashioned awesome job.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Also, does anyone know if there are suitable fenders for fatbikes like this?
    My LBS sells fat bike fenders that are thermally formed from ABS Haircell plastic.

    But then you don't get all that mud up your back.


    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    BTW, amazing thread. Just a good, old-fashioned awesome job.
    Thank you.

  47. #47
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    Specs:

    ================================================

    BRAKES: 180mm rotors both Front and Rear

    LEVERS: Radius (alloy)

    CASSETTE: Sunrace 9-speed, 11-36T

    CHAIN: KMC Z99 9-speed with EPT anti-rust coating

    CRANKSET: Prowheel 951 Triple, 40/30/22T chainrings

    BOTTOM BRACKET: Feimin FP-B921/9SS 160mm

    FORK: alloy, 28.5 mm stem clamp

    HEADSET: VP-Z104 semi-integrated

    STEM: 3D forged 6061 aluminum, 31.8mm clamp diameter

    FRAME: Mongoose MTB aluminum fat tire hardtail

    FRONT DERAILLEUR: Shimano FD-410 E-type BB mount

    GRIPS: Mongoose rubber

    HANDLEBAR: Double-butted aluminum, 31.8mm clamp diameter

    PEDALS: Nylon platform reflectors

    REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano RD-M3000

    SADDLE: Mongoose MTB trail

    SEATPOST: Aluminum 31.6mm x 350mm Micro Adjust

    SHIFTERS: Shimano M-370 3x9-speed ALTUS

    TIRES: Kenda Juggernaut 26 x 4.0" Sport

    WHEELSET: Rims: 26" aluminum, 32 hole, 100mm wide with cutouts

    HUBS: Alloy disc, 32 hole, Front=135mm quick release axle. Rear=190mm quick release axle

    SPOKES: Stainless steel

    SIZES: S M L

    Large Size measurements:

    Where Seat Tube meets Top Tube: 30"

    Where balls hit Top Tube if you slip from seat: 32"

    Where Top Tube meets Head Tube: 35.5"

    -

    Medium size:

    Where Seat Tube meets Top Tube: 29.5"

    Midway between Seat Tube and Head Tube: 30.5"

    -

    Small Size:

    Need data from someone !
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-argus.png  

    Last edited by vid1900; 08-25-2016 at 02:50 PM.

  48. #48
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    > REAR DERAILLEUR: Shimano RD-M390
    Rear Derailleur received is RD-M3000; low-end Shadow. Mine shifts very poorly.

  49. #49
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    Here are some requested pictures.

    Fork
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-1.jpg  


  50. #50
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    Seat Stay clearance
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-2.jpg  


  51. #51
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    Chain Stay:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-3.jpg  


  52. #52
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    Derailleur Hanger

    This piece is supposed to self destruct if you smash your Derailleur into something, rather than allow your frame to get bent.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-5.jpgArgus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-4.jpg

    You probably want to carry a spare with you on the trails.

    Wheels Manufacturing sells their version #94 for $22

    Wheels Manufacturing Derailleur Hanger 94


    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-6.jpg

    Or you can get a real Chinese one from Aliexpress for $3.88 shipped, item #12 .

    Wholesales Universal MTB Road Bike Bicycle Tail Hook Mountain Bike Alloy Rear Derailleur Hanger For All Bike Frame-in Bicycle Derailleur from Sports & Entertainment on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group

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  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Remember: never ride at night
    .. then why those silly reflectors in spokes??

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    .. then why those silly reflectors in spokes??
    The Consumer Products Safety Commission requires it:

    ----------------------------------------------------------

    " To make sure that motorists can see bicycle riders at night, bicycles (other than sidewalk bicycles) must have a combination of reflectors. Because of the complexity of these requirements, we have not attempted to include all of the tests and detail in this summary. You should carefully read the provisions of §1512.16 for more specific information.



    Generally, bicycles must have a colorless front reflector, recessed colorless or amber reflectors on the back and front sides of the pedals, and a red reflector on the rear. They must also have a reflector mounted on the spokes of each wheel, or reflective front and rear wheel rims or tire sidewalls. See §1512.18(n) for tests that measure the reflectance value of reflectors.



    The front and rear reflectors must be mounted so that they do not hit the ground when the bicycle falls over. The requirements of the regulation also include specific angles for mounting the reflectors. See §1512.18(m) for tests that apply to front and rear reflectors.



    The side reflector on a front wheel must be colorless or amber, and the rear wheel side reflector must be colorless or red. Reflective material on the sidewall or rim of a tire must go around the entire circumference, must not peel, scrape, or rub off, and must meet certain reflectance tests. See §1512.18(o) for these reflectance tests and §1512.18(r) for the abrasion test for reflective rims. "

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    The 2017 Argus with Bluto looks really nice.
    Much nicer tires and rear derailleur, but 24/38T chainrings seem crazy; 30T seems to me ideal with 11-36T cassette.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    You can also see in the picture that the Front Derailleur mounting bracket is mounted using the BB Bearing.
    Did you happen to measure the thickness of that front derailleur mounting bracket? I suppose that eliminating it would want spacers of that thickness...

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    The Consumer Products Safety Commission requires it
    OK, similar to mandating auto seatbelts, then mandating airbags rated for occupants NOT wearing seatbelts.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    Did you happen to measure the thickness of that front derailleur mounting bracket? I suppose that eliminating it would want spacers of that thickness...
    The bracket is 5mm.

  59. #59
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    what size did you get, and what's the stand over height? i have a friend looking to pick one up for winter commuting and he's 5"4" with a 30" inseam. guessing the Small would fit, but since it's an online order i don't want him to be surprised with something he can't straddle.

  60. #60
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    Its a shame this more expensive bike wasn't able to address the biggest drawbacks with the Vinson. Namely the noodly fork, QR axles that pop open under load, and flexy/inaccurate shifting FD mounting.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madcityfatty View Post
    what size did you get, and what's the stand over height? i have a friend looking to pick one up for winter commuting and he's 5"4" with a 30" inseam. guessing the Small would fit, but since it's an online order i don't want him to be surprised with something he can't straddle.
    I can't find the standover height in any of the specs.

    I got the Large (I'm 6'7") and Bflaker (who is 5'8") got the Medium.

    I'll measure the standover for you, Hopefully Bflaker can measure the Medium.

  62. #62
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    by those measurements, i'm guessing the small will fill pretty well. he tried out a lower spec Mongoose Vinson in a local store, and it was slightly large, but still probably doable. the vinson frame ( one size fits all) has a little more than an inch longer top tube, and the seat tube is almost 2 inches longer. i'm pushing him to move up to the Argus as the price difference through Nashbar is all of $20 more for better specs and what looks like a better fit.

    honestly, he's using it for winter commuting, and won't likely be trail-bound more than once or twice a year, so either would probably work well.

    also, thanks for getting back to me!

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowride454 View Post
    Its a shame this more expensive bike wasn't able to address the biggest drawbacks with the Vinson. Namely the noodly fork, QR axles that pop open under load, and flexy/inaccurate shifting FD mounting.
    =====================

    The Argus at $450 shipped, is about the same price as the Vinson, so I did not expect too much.

    It has many better components than the Vinson, and it comes in a bigger frame size option than the Vinson (important to me). So that means that the Argus is a better VALUE; not necessarily a miracle bike.


    The gears did not shift properly out of the box, but once I set them up correctly, they work totally fine.

    I've been beating up the Argus on the trails behind my house for a week and have not had the QR Axles pop a single time. I have other bikes with QR, ridden for many years, and they don't pop either. If your QRs are popping, they are probably worn out or locked at the wrong angle.

    The fork is an aluminum fork, so it's what you'd expect from an aluminum fork. You can replace it with a Sarma CF or a steel one if you feel you need it. Hell, you can buy the Argus Expert for $1200 and it comes with the Bluto already installed.

    I don't think there is a better value out there for $450 shipped right now. If there was, I would have bought it.

  64. #64
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    medium stand over height

    Quote Originally Posted by Madcityfatty View Post
    what size did you get, and what's the stand over height?
    My medium Argus Sport top tube is about 29.5 inches directly above BB and 30.5 midway between head and seat tubes.
    I have a 32 inch stand over, and
    it feels small to me because the steerer tube is short.

    The stem seems too long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    My medium Argus Sport top tube is about 29.5 inches directly above BB and 30.5 midway between head and seat tubes.
    I have a 32 inch stand over, and
    it feels small to me because the steerer tube is short.

    The stem seems too long.
    based on this info and comparing the measurements of the Vinson (which he tried and found a little large) and the Argus size small, it think the small will work very well.

    I'll make sure to post a picture of us with our Fatties once i get his set up per this excellent thread!

    Thanks Guys!

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    The Large Argus Sport is:

    30" where the top tube connects to the seat tube.

    32" where you would hit your balls if you slipped directly out of the seat.

    35.5" where the top tube connects to the head tube.

    (These measurements could vary slightly depending on the air in the tires, but it should get you guys in the ballpark)

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    large = 32" stand over vs medium ~ 30

    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    The Large Argus Sport is:
    32" where you would hit your balls if you slipped directly out of the seat.
    Thanks for that; I had wondered whether the medium was a mistake. With a 26x4.5 front tire, I could be in trouble on a large.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    Thanks for that; I had wondered whether the medium was a mistake. With a 26x4.5 front tire, I could be in trouble on a large.
    Yeah, you made the right choice for sure.

    -

    I've found a guy with a Small Argus locally. Now if I can find a Medium, we can have them all side by side latter for the video in the review portion of this post.

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    This advertisement for the KMC chain is partially under the clear Mylar chainslap guard.

    I suspect that it peel fine from the bike frame, but maybe not so well from the Mylar.....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-29.jpg  


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    shifting

    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    The gears did not shift properly out of the box, but once I set them up correctly, they work totally fine.
    I removed large and small chainrings and replaced the rear derailleur with a used RD-M770 GS. I had been unable to consistently shift into 8 or 2 from 9 and 7 or 1 and 3, respectively. Before replacing the original RD, I removed the rear wheel and tested the M3000 for rigidity; it failed.
    With RD-M770 installed, flex is noted only in the hanger (replacement on order).

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    ADJUSTING THE PEDAL CONES

    =======================================

    Like just about everything that comes on a Chinabike, the Pedal Cones were way too tight.

    The Pedals should spin freely, not spin 2 revolutions and stop.

    You have to take the Pedals off to do this adjustment, or you won't be able to **feel** where you are at.

    Turning the Pedal Axle while in your hands, you will feel the hallmark "tuk, tuk, tuk" of too tight bearings.

    1. Using a Scratch Awl, pop off the nylon dust cover.

    2. Using a 1/2" Socket Wrench, loosen the Lock Nut 2 turns.

    (The Right Pedal's Axle has a reverse threaded Lock Nut. This keeps it from loosening while in use.)

    3. Even your thinnest, thin wall socket won't fit down inside to adjust the Cone, so carefully slip a Standard Screwdriver blade along one of the flat sides of the Cone.

    4. Turn the Pedal Axle until you get a smooth as glass action.

    5. Once you find the perfect action, loosen the cone 1/4 turn. We do this because the threads are not precision cut, and when you tighten the Lock Nut, it will put addational pressure on the cone.

    6. Tighten the Lock Nut.

    7. Test your spin. If you have no play, but no grinding or tuk, tuk, tuk feel, you've properly adjusted your Pedal.

    8. If you don't get it right the first time, simply loosen the Lock Nut and try again. It may take you a few tries.

    9. Replace your Dust Cap, and install the Pedals.

    Remember to lightly grease the threads on the Pedals, so they can easily be removed at a latter date.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11pedal3.jpg  


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    While I don't usually recommend you take the Cone and Bearings out unless you need to (maybe to get some grit out of them), here are some pictures so you can visualize how the system works.

    If you do need to do a complete disassembly, you will need a tray to contain all the tiny bearings that will go everywhere.

    I use a cafeteria tray I stole from Burger King.

    -

    Here you can see with the Cone removed, the Bearings are exposed.

    There is the same Cup and Bearings on the other side of the pedal too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11pedal.jpg  


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    Here, with the bearings removed, you can see the Cup.

    Wipe off the old grease, and put a nice bed of new Grease down.

    The Grease will hold the bearings in place during reassembly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11pedal2.jpg  


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    Here, you can see the Axle and the Cone.

    Grease these in the locations that the bearings will run on, before reassembly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11pedal1.jpg  


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    shimano M775 M595 M596 M965 M665 disc brake pads

    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Better brakes
    I pulled a front pad; it is compatible with M775 M595 M596 M965 M665.

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    A couple of you guys asked what grease I recommend.

    Grease always gets an argument started, because everyone is religiously fanatical about their brand, so let's avoid that.

    A lot of people love Parks Grease. It works. It's blue. It's $8 for 4 ounces. (even though there is a picture on the tube of a chain, don't use this grease on a chain).

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-onecol.jpg

    A lot of people love Marine Grease. It works. It's also blue. It's waterproof. It's $4 for 14 ounces.

    (if you buy a tube of Marine Grease, just pull the plastic cap off - don't pull the metal "pull tab" because you won't be able to re-seal it. The pull tab is used if you are inserting it into a grease gun)

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-mobile.jpg

    Basically, you use so little grease, that a tube will last most people years.

    A few dollars of difference is no big deal.

    Bike bearings don't really get hot like a trailer being towed down a highway at 70 miles per hour, so don't get too hung up on "high temp formula", "super cooling ceramic particles" or any other un-testable claims that might not apply to bikes anyway.

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    The bike right now at Nashbar is $449 shipped. I am really temped by this bike.

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    fat bike for frugal but discerning masses

    Quote Originally Posted by Brickell View Post
    The bike right now at Nashbar is $449 shipped. I am really temped by this bike.
    It would, IMO, be a much better deal with a better rear derailleur and Bluto forks for $1000. In other words, it is basically sound but benefits from upgrades.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blekenbleu View Post
    It would, IMO, be a much better deal with a better rear derailleur and Bluto forks for $1000. In other words, it is basically sound but benefits from upgrades.
    Although there is always a chance you could get a bad derailleur, the existing one works perfectly well - once properly set up.

    If any of you guys want the Argus with Bluto forks, upgraded derailleur, hydro brakes, 4.5" gumwall tires, sweetass rims, tapered headtube and host of other upgrades, the Argus Expert is on sale right now for only $1199 today.

    Mongoose Argus Expert Fat Bike

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    Dang, kinda makes me wish I would of saved up and got the Expert instead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vid1900 View Post
    Although there is always a chance you could get a bad derailleur, the existing one works perfectly well - once properly set up.

    If any of you guys want the Argus with Bluto forks, upgraded derailleur, hydro brakes, 4.5" gumwall tires, sweetass rims, tapered headtube and host of other upgrades, the Argus Expert is on sale right now for only $1199 today.

    Mongoose Argus Expert Fat Bike
    How are the rims sweet ass?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    How are the rims sweet ass?
    They are more sweetass than sweet ass.

    How could anyone not love gold anodized, swiss cheese?

    Big pimpin' fo sho.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bflaker View Post
    Dang, kinda makes me wish I would of saved up and got the Expert instead.

    Send your Argus back, and get the Argus Expert.

    Nashbar allows you to return bikes anytime:


    "
    Forever Guarantee

    At Nashbar it’s quite simple: we believe in each and every one of the 10,000+ products we sell - from the most modest of cable ends to complete dream bikes - and we stand behind them 100%. That means if for any reason you are not satisfied, simply return the item and we'll replace it or provide a refund. No muss, no fuss, no time limits. That’s right – we’re talking forever. It's our promise to you and it's the best in the business.

    "

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    SETTING UP THE BRAKES

    ==========================================

    If you've never had a bike with Disc Brakes, they can be a source of endless frustration to the beginner.

    The fat tires on these bikes often obscure your line of sight to the pads.

    Even getting the 100mm macro camera lens in the proper position as to not introduce parallax errors was difficult.

    Cable Disc Brakes are actually very easy to set up and maintain, you just have to do the steps in order.

    ---------

    The first step is to loosen the Lock Ring on the Brake Lever.

    Then turn the Adjuster all the way in until it stops.

    Finally back the Adjuster out, one full turn.

    This will give us some room for fine adjustments at the end.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-1.jpg  


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    Set up the front brake first, because it's a little easier to maneuver around.

    The Disc is supposed to run in the center of the Gap.

    Here is how poorly the Brake came set up from the box.

    The Brake housing itself would rub, lol.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-2.jpg  


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    Next, we want to move the fixed Brake Pad out of the Gap.

    Start by backing out the Set Screw from the fixed side of the Brake housing.

    You need a 2mm Allen Wrench for this.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-3.jpg  


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    With the Set Screw backed out of the way, we can now back the fixed Brake Pad out of the Gap.

    Use a 5mm Allen Wrench for this step.

    The large central bolt is the adjustment point.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-5.jpg  


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    Next we put the wheel back on.

    Make sure the QR (Quick Release) lever is locked down tight.

    If you don't lock it down to normal riding tension, the Disc might not be in the same position that it always is.

    The QR Lever for the front wheel should be locked between the fork and the Brake mount. This is the most protected location; keeping it away from being hooked by branches while riding.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-6.jpg  


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    Release the tension on the Brake Cable by loosening the 5mm Cable Clamp bolt.

    Then loosen the two Brake Adjustment bolts, also using a 5mm Allen Wrench.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-7.jpg  


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    Now move the Brake Housing until you have it centered over the Disc.

    Carefully, without moving the Housing, tighten the 2 Brake Adjustment bolts to keep it in position.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-8.jpg  


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    For the next step, we use 2 normal business cards.

    I know business cards come in different styles and thicknesses, but just find 2 clean **average** paper cards. At the bike shop we had fancy brass gauges, but we don't need anything like that for a $450 bike.

    Put the 2 cards between the Disc and the Fixed Pad.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-9.jpg

    Next, using a 5mm Allen Wrench, bring the Fixed Brake Pad into contact with the cards.

    Not too tight, not even enough to move the Disc. Just enough to hold the cards in place.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-10.jpg

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    Lock the Set Screw back down on the Fixed Pad Adjustment, using the 2mm Allen Wrench.

    I know some people like to do this step near the end, but a beginner is likely to forget, so I'm going to advise to do it now. You can always loosen it again if you somehow need further Fixed Pad adjustment.

    Q: Vid, should I use Loc-Tite on that Set Screw?

    A: You can use Blue Loc-Tite if you want to, but only 1/10 of a drop. Because that is such a small screw, if you goop too much Loc-Tite on it, you might never get it out without stripping it. NEVER use Red Loc-Tite on a small set screw!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-11.jpg  

    Last edited by vid1900; 08-24-2016 at 02:28 PM.

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    The expert what bike would you compare it to ? Is it really worth to get the expert over the non ?

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    Now move the 2 business cards to the side of the disc with the moving Pad.

    Gently squeeze the Brake Arm until it holds the cards in place. Tighten the Cable Clamp in this position.

    Now let go of the Brake Arm, remove the cards and spin the wheel in the direction it normally rides in (there is a little arrow etched on the Disc if you are confused because the bike is upsidedown).

    Wallah! You now have a properly adjusted Disc Brake.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-12.jpg

    Remember when I said to spin the wheel in the proper direction? That is because the Brake Discs are mounted to a Flange that is threaded to the Wheel Hub.

    After a bike is used a few times, those Flanges are really spun down tight, from all the braking torque.

    But when a bike is fresh from the box, the Flanges might actually unscrew themselves themselves if you spin the wheel backwards and then apply the Brake Arm.

    Pay attention to this.

    Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-13.jpg
    Last edited by vid1900; 08-25-2016 at 09:03 AM.

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    Looking from above, you can see the even gap in the properly adjusted Brake.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-14.jpg  


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    Cut the excess Brake Cable so that there is NO WAY the cable could possibly touch the Brake Disc.

    If a long cable ever gets jammed in the Disc, it will instantly throw you over the handlebars to your death.

    Don't skip this step.

    To keep the cable from unraveling, you can slip on a cable ferrule and crimp it with your pliers, or use a drop of solder from a soldering iron.

    Solder won't stick to stainless steel cable, but these Argus cables appear to be galvanized, so solder away.

    -

    Test the brake on the floor of the shop, hand pushing the bike, BEFORE you go out riding.

    Test ride the bike, if the brakes are rubbing, a tiny adjustment up at the lever will fix it on the fly. Lock the Adjuster Barrel once you find the magic spot.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Argus:  A fat bike for the masses? Review & Assembly-16.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Brickell View Post
    The expert what bike would you compare it to ? Is it really worth to get the expert over the non ?
    It's hard to compare one bike to another, because there is always some difference that the owner of that bike will shout out as if it is the most important feature in the world.

    "Wait! You are forgetting that the Traildump has a VP-8800 bottom bracket not the VP-8000 like the Bushburner!!!! You are crazy if you think they are similar bikes!!!" -Traildump owner.

    The regular Argus is an amazing value for $450.

    But if you really wanted the RockShox forks, it would make financial sense to buy the Expert right off the bat. It would save you cash, and you would get a heap of other excellent upgrades at the same time.

    You are always one upgrade away from the bike you really want.

    The trick is to decide where to stop; and just enjoy the ride.

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    The kid at the LBS this morning reminded me about the Chris Akrigg video he did with the Argus

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8bdEpUiiuU

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    this is all super great info. i'm used to setting up and refurbishing old road bikes, and don't have all of the tools necessary to set everything up. which tool is the right one for the Bottom bracket? it looks like a 20 tooth tool.

    is this one the right one?
    https://www.amazon.com/BIKEHAND-Bicy...m+bracket+tool

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madcityfatty View Post
    this is all super great info. i'm used to setting up and refurbishing old road bikes, and don't have all of the tools necessary to set everything up. which tool is the right one for the Bottom bracket? it looks like a 20 tooth tool.

    is this one the right one?
    https://www.amazon.com/BIKEHAND-Bicy...m+bracket+tool
    Yes, that looks like it will do it.

    This is the Parks tool, if you are a Parks kind of guy (3x the price, though).

    https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-BBT...0ZMJTH4SG7N001

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