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  1. #1
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    Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?

    45NRTH Escalator (this year's Dillinger) 180tpi. Ran into a piece of sheet metal. Tire only has 150 miles on it and was $180... so needless to say, I'm not very happy.

    I put a patch on it, and the tire is not run tubeless. How do you think it will fare? My bike is used in all conditions and have a big ride tomorrow.

    It's on the rear if it matters, but might get moved to the front.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_4320.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Needle and thread, then put a patch inside. I have had good luck with 2 cuts like the one in your picture.

  3. #3
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    What kind of thread? How much separation between each stitch?

  4. #4
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    Does anyone think this cut is so big a vulcanizing machine at an auto tire shop can take care of it?

  5. #5
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    I stitched mine then cut the sidewall off another old tire and used shoe goo to patch the inside - It held up for about 3 weeks until I started losing a little sealant from around the stitching (meaning my inner patch was compromised) so I wasn't feeling safe about running it anymore.

    On inspection it was just a little corner on the inside patch where sealant was getting under/out, I would be more than happy running this if I was running it with a tube FWIW.

    Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_20130907_151014.jpg

  6. #6
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98srx6 View Post
    Needle and thread, then put a patch inside. I have had good luck with 2 cuts like the one in your picture.
    This. I've done this on many tires. You have to sew it, because otherwise anything you put there just tries to "push" through the previous hole, even if it's glued. I usually douse the threads in a little epoxy once I get the thing sewed up.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by maelstromwbc View Post
    Does anyone think this cut is so big a vulcanizing machine at an auto tire shop can take care of it?
    I have a friend who has had good luck getting a few tires repaired at auto tire shops.

  8. #8
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    I've used 'superglue' and dental floss in the past - then stick a 'tyrewall' patch on the back ( bitd every puncture kit had a tyre wall patch included(?))

  9. #9
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    I picked up a nylon thread it was a lot nicer to use than dental floss I think it was sort of hybrid thread ;-)

  10. #10
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    I repaired a sidewall tear with regular sewing thread, no patch to back it up. I just "whip" stitched it, which gave me a raised kinda ugly spot. It seeped sealant for a few rides, but sealed up and held well enough that it lasted til I wore the tire out. The fabric of the tire carcass held the stitches well, w/o ripping or pullng out.

    If I have to do it again, I plan to use a baseball stitch - which is designed to give a flat, butted seam. This flat seam may require an internal patch, which I would make from a cut bit of innertube - or perhaps just goop, or nothing at all again.

    Baseball stitch:

    I think this is a double version (two needles/threads at once)
    Fatbikes are much more fun than they should be allowed to be!

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  11. #11
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    I've had good luck using a baseball like stitch with dental floss, putting a patch on it, and using tubes. Have not tried tubeless.

  12. #12
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    Okay. Last night I put a patch on the inside and a patch on the outside. WHen I woke up, it was bloated from the tire separating and looked like some sort of pimple on the tire. So, I decided I had to do something to keep it from opening up.

    Like mentioned in the thread, and by a couple people, I decided to sew it up. I used a curved needle and 'Sports and Outdoors' thread from the fabric store.

    I did two sewing wraps and now with pressure it looks smooth. There is also a Park emergency tire boot on the inside. I tried glueing a small piece of tube to the outside, but can't get it to stick.

    Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_1933.jpgAnyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_1934.jpgAnyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_1936.jpg

  13. #13
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    Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?

    Quote Originally Posted by maelstromwbc View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I ran a Panaracer Smoke in the 90's with the same sort of repair until the tread finally gave out. If that old tire could tell stories...


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  14. #14
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    FWIW, I have NO experience with this sort of thing on a fat tire (YET, knock on wood), but we had an Allis Chalmers farm tractor that got a cut like this in 1968: I was 10 and so was the tractor. Tire taken off, sewn up with heavy braided cord, then a section of boot was glued inside.

    I "inherited" that tractor and replaced the now-worn-smooth tires in 2009. The ends of the cotton cord inside the tire began to rot and a couple of stitches had pulled out, but the repair had not completely failed. If you can get 1/10 that service out of the bike tire, I think you'd be happy.

  15. #15
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    Went on a 28mi/3370ft climbing ride today and it held fine. It separated a little bit to where you can see a small big of the boot, but it looks like it'll work until I can stomach spending $150.

    And might I say WOW, the bike is totally different now that the Larry is gone. I don't wash out on turns anymore. I'm going to have to relearn how to ride the Pugsley.

  16. #16
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    Patched this Escalator back in the spring where a 1/4" stick had punctured the tire. Rode the 2nd half of a 12 mile ride the other day with a slow leak that I had to pump up a few times to finish the ride. Opened up the tire to find that a new stick went through the exact same hole and broke off at the surface. This is dead center in the tread area. Amazingly, it didn't pop the tube (Q-tube light 2.7). What are the odds?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Anyone had good luck with patching sidwall?-img_1158.jpg  


  17. #17
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    FYI, my sewing job is still going strong.

  18. #18
    Sangre de Los Turnips
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    I have a Larry that needs a sidewall repair. Problem is that the edges of the cut do not line up because a small piece of the sidewall was damaged too badly. Any advice on what to patch the opening with?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by maelstromwbc View Post
    FYI, my sewing job is still going strong.
    Heck yeah, that's how you repair tires
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  20. #20
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    Sew the tear then use Monkey Grip Radial Tire Patches available at most auto parts stores. These are designed for car tires and I've had extremly good luck using them on tubeless bike tires including a 45nrth Husker Du

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