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  1. #26
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    Exactly. Saying that everyone chooses their equipment based on fashion or an identity they want to project... is naive. Perhaps it is even projecting one' sown thought process into other people. Some people are slave to fashion but a large percentage of people aren't.

    I ride singlespeed because it is less maintenance, lighter, quieter, cheaper, more durable. And best of all, it frees my mind when riding. The bike and I become one. It isn't me controlling the bike but rather just a fixed extension of my body. Put simply, the bike was not bought based on marketing.

    So no, not everyone chooses based on fashion. Surly's marketing is unique and there is nothing wrong with that. I don't own a surly but appreciate their creativity.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfiler View Post
    I ride singlespeed because it is less maintenance, lighter, quieter, cheaper, more durable. And best of all, it frees my mind when riding. The bike and I become one. It isn't me controlling the bike but rather just a fixed extension of my body. Put simply, the bike was not bought based on marketing.
    Heck yeah man. All that stuff.

    I simply couldn't hack it. I prefer to ride flats now (I found myself injuring my hamstrings), and my slovenly riding chops couldn't get it to work on climbs.

    I'm riding a pavement bike with a two speed crank (FSA Patterson) which is pretty fun. It is cheap and simple to use and it gets me up the climbs with some single-speed-ish technique. I want similar for off road but was not long term impressed with a Hammerschmidt setup.

    Either way - I ride to empty my brain of earthly concerns. Fewer moving parts, less to go wrong.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    I like that you have no f*cking clue who you are talking to.

    Mendon Cycle Smith
    Really? I would say the same about you...Do you think that bike choice is only tied to what works best? Thats almost as silly as some 230lb fat guy trying to reduce his bikes weight by 100 grams ....Yet i see it in bike shops all the time.

    surlys are over priced, its been posted here many times....how do they get away with it?...image ....image ties into fashion.
    Old guy in the woods

  4. #29
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    I always pictured Surly riders as blue collar, cheap beer drinking, rock and rollers. Have I been wrong all these years?

  5. #30
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    Some of us like expensive beer and Death Metal

  6. #31
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    Big Dumbie + Gulden Draak + Deicide = cool

  7. #32
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    I never connected Surly to Gucci. Must be part of that global wide Velomati conspiracy.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Co-opski View Post
    I always pictured Surly riders as blue collar, cheap beer drinking, rock and rollers. Have I been wrong all these years?
    That's marketing. Surly has done some brilliant marketing- they've managed to make straight gauge 4130 bikes desirable. 20 years ago, straight gauge 4130 was considered 1 step better than gas pipe. then the steel bike market almost died and all the fancy steels (which, honestly, were just fancier, manipulated and carefully drawn versions of 4130) went away.

    They charge a pretty high price for what would have once been considered a bottom of the barrel frame. It's a $500 hotrock frame.

    They've cultivated a "blue collar" attitude... or at least what middle class kids think blue collar means. Hang out with some blue collar folks and you'll find that what surly sells as blue collar and what blue collar actually means are two very different things. Blue collar means you don't have a lot of cash, and you take meticulous care of your gear because you bought the best you could get and you want it to last- the faux dirtball attitude that surly sells isn't blue collar. Watch blue collar guys take care of their Harleys sometime- do they let dirt sit on the chrome for more than a second? No. Do they buy unattractive colors? No. Do they ride their gear hard and put it away wet? No. They take care of it.

    What you see as a blue collar attitude is blue collar as envisioned by hipsters who's only real connection to blue collar is a sons of anarchy marathon.

    I would suggest that surly is a lot more like deBeers than Gucci- a company based on manufacturing false scarcity.

  9. #34
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    later

    who the heck cares about any of it anyways.. all this petty bs. i am done with it.. have a good life

  10. #35
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    It does work

    Not about Surly, but about the 'marketing'.

    The OP brings up a valid point.

    The more rudely she is sold, the more I see her tattered and torn, the more I am drawn to embrace her up from the dust, remembering my disgrace.

    Star-Spangled Banner like youve never heard it before

    Numbers 1 - 2 - 6 - 10 (considering then and now) and the last two.

    May men be found, and Providence see fit to again uphold the crying plea of mankind.

    Happy B-Day America.

  11. #36
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    I am convinced there are people that like to argue online as much as I like to ride.

    The arguments in here can be made about the majority of brands.

    Want to solve something, try to figure out a way for me not look at someone in disgust everytime a new person says "those are big tires" like I have never heard it before.

  12. #37
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    Why would you expect a Surly frame to cost lesser than an Aluminum frame? 90% of the cost of your frame is stuff other than the cost of the steel/aluminum. If the cost of chromoly steel made up even 50% of the retail cost of a Surly frame, I bet the LHT 62cm frame would cost more than the LHT 42cm frame. As it is today, they cost the same which tells me that the actual cost of the steel is negligible.

    It's much the same with other companies. Surprised to see the price for Brook's new Cambium which uses rubber instead of leather? You're paying for more than just the raw material.

  13. #38
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    I have 3 Surly bikes currently, have had 5 total. Their marketing is ineffective to me. I just like simple, well built, adaptable, no BS, steel bikes.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountsports.net

  14. #39
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    If you're old enough, you just might remember the International Harvester pickups and the Travelall. Studebaker cars and trucks, too.

    Would they still be around today if they had marketed them like Surly?

    Checker car company made klunky 56-chevy-looking cars for 20 years. Until about 1982 anyone could buy one new and drive it 500,000 miles. A few people did.

    If they had marketed them like Surly?

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Some of us like expensive beer and Death Metal
    Heck yeah, party on Garth!! Cheers
    And I love beer!!

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    I like that you have no f*cking clue who you are talking to.

    Mendon Cycle Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    That was a little funny.
    me gotz a chuckle too.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MUSTCLIME View Post
    Really?
    yes really.

  18. #43
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    Um, I think a lot of people are forgetting that Surly has made much of its money by selling bikes nobody else was making. I'm not sure how much image has to do with it.
    Noogie...Noogie...Noogie.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldfatbaldguy View Post
    If you're old enough, you just might remember the International Harvester pickups and the Travelall. Studebaker cars and trucks, too.

    Would they still be around today if they had marketed them like Surly?

    Checker car company made klunky 56-chevy-looking cars for 20 years. Until about 1982 anyone could buy one new and drive it 500,000 miles. A few people did.

    If they had marketed them like Surly?

    "Like"^

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    Um, I think a lot of people are forgetting that Surly has made much of its money by selling bikes nobody else was making. I'm not sure how much image has to do with it.
    That sums up my Surly purchases.

    I hadn't heard of them when I bought my first 1x1, but it was the first SS specific mtb frame I'd seen so I jumped on it. I also later bought an Instigator, and that was because of its very strong rear end - it was bought for an overland expedition.

    And there was no alternative to the Pugsley in the UK when I bought mine.

    The website persona is just fun IMO. Plus the Surly guys turn up to the odd event, actually ride their bikes, drink beer, and talk to us about bikes. That seems to get us bikes we want to actually use. The "Racing Sucks" approach works for me.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  21. #46
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    Mr Spock Troll threw a line out and caught some crackers !!!

    Dont feed it....
    Ti O'Beast
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  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    Um, I think a lot of people are forgetting that Surly has made much of its money by selling bikes nobody else was making. I'm not sure how much image has to do with it.
    Thank you, it took us two pages until this was finally said.
    Transition Bandit 29
    Surly Ogre
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    Surly Big Dummy

  23. #48
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    People are also forgetting that they took a massive risk by investing in fatbike tire production.
    Transition Bandit 29
    Surly Ogre
    Surly Necro Pugs w/ Lefty PBR
    Surly Big Dummy

  24. #49
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    I am guilty of owning many Surly Tyres... and the other QBP brand 45NRTH tyres, awesome products, if they didn't make them we would be a lot worse off today... maybe ??????

    I dont want to get dragged into this troll dig but Surly go out on a limb with reasonably priced stuff and usually hit the spot.

    If you want to be conservative... take a back seat and shut up.
    Ti O'Beast
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  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldfatbaldguy View Post
    If you're old enough, you just might remember the International Harvester pickups and the Travelall. Studebaker cars and trucks, too.

    Would they still be around today if they had marketed them like Surly?

    Checker car company made klunky 56-chevy-looking cars for 20 years. Until about 1982 anyone could buy one new and drive it 500,000 miles. A few people did.

    If they had marketed them like Surly?
    Old enough!

    As a kid my father once thought about buying a Checker, (9 kids) I think he got out voted by the styling dept.

    Could it be that anyone who is taking the marketing approach of Surly seriously is missing the point?

    I mean, what do you suppose is going on at Surly Headquarters as they read what is being said about them here?

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