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  1. #1
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    All-Mountain Epic "Seven Summits" on a Moonlander! Gather-round, kids!

    This is Seven Summits near Rossland, British Columbia on Sunday September 9th, 2012. The ride is about 22 miles with over 3500' of elevation gain (corrected from another thread where my uncorrected GPS data showed over 4000').

    Doubters said I was crazy to try this on a fat bike. I'm not stupid. I realize it's a full-rigid bike and the terrain is very rough (having ridden it on a FS Giant the year prior). It was an experiment to see how far I could push the Moonlander. The climbs were fairly easy. It was the rocky descents that kicked my ass. Never again, but I'm glad I did it because I learned a few things.

    At the trail head:



    An omen of things to come, here I am as we've barely begun the big climb to the first summit. Don't ask me how I managed to do this, but I fell over a couple more times throughout the ride as if I hadn't learned to balance a bike yet. lol We Have Lift Off (Fat Bike into me) - YouTube
    And here I am smiling like a fool right before that!


    There was a 40% chance of thunderstorms and the odds turned against us. Before reaching the first summit the cold wind was a reminder that indeed we were getting up there. Myself and one other rider didn't come prepared for it. At the summit the wind was bitterly cold in relation to the 90+ degrees we'd ridden in most of the summer. Right over our heads was the thunderstorm that had us debating on whether to continue the ride. The four of us huddled under some trees while hail poured around us and lightning cracked the sky. It moved on after about 20 minutes, so we got back on the trail.


    Thanks to the Canadians who put up such informative signage!

    Shortly thereafter we're on our way to the 2nd summit. It's not much of a climb. This is looking backward with me coming down from the left... lest ye not forget; on a Moonlander.


    THE YEAR BEFORE
    On the way down the 2nd summit I manage to clip my pedal (or something, I still dunno what exactly happened) and went sailing OTB. It was a freak accident. Witnesses thought I was done, expecting a broken collarbone. Worst part was the face and mouthful of dirt, as well as snapping the Contour HD off my helmet. I just got a couple scratches! The cam angle is weird cuz I didn't check it beforehand. It turned out to be a perfect angle for the crash! This time I made it through just fine.

    The violent crash that everyone I know loves to cringe at!: Seven Summits Pole Vaulting - YouTube


    Back to the present...

    Some more nice shots along the way.




    Charlie AKA chazreign (http://forums.mtbr.com/member.php?u=393333) and I.


    Much later in the ride. My apologies, I forgot the obligatory Fat Bike Smile! I was a little tired. Charlie and I had already been dusted by our other two friends. We had to take our time getting sexy photos!


    Last summit before the Way-Too-Rough-For-A-Rigid-Fat-Bike-Downhill-Descent.





    Not a fat bike, but still a nice sled. He just bought a week before! Piloted by Charlie AKA chazreign.


    And me, remembering to smile!

  2. #2
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    The fatbike overlords will shine down upon you my good man! you gents went outside your comfort zone and prevailed

  3. #3
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    Awesome post....now how do I change my name from chazreign to ummm chazstump or chazstumpy

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    The fatbike overlords will shine down upon you my good man! you gents went outside your comfort zone and prevailed
    I for one welcome our fatbike overlords!

    Quote Originally Posted by chazreign
    Awesome post....now how do I change my name from chazreign to ummm chazstump or chazstumpy
    Not until you peel the MAESTRO sticker off your truck!

  5. #5
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    well done, maybe with less weight it would of been easier?
    2014 milage so far - 2,167
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupremeDork View Post
    Charlie AKA chazreign (http://forums.mtbr.com/member.php?u=393333) and I.

    ˇ Bueno !
    owner/raconteur at fat-bike.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by saltyman View Post
    well done, maybe with less weight it would of been easier?
    Naw, it was the tire pressure mainly. I was running 12 PSI to prevent pinch flats. Fortunately I didn't have a single flat despite being rocked (pun intended) on almost every descent.

    Most of the weight was liquids. Water, Gatorade, and an energy drink. I could have taken a backpack, but I left it behind. It was all part of my experiment!

  9. #9
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    Very cool pics, looks like a gret ride!!

  10. #10
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    Nates are the perfect tire for those sort of terrain conditions. I run mine at around 7psi. Rocks, no problem. Great traction for the downhill loose and off-camber stuff. Just a suggestion to try the next time you ride there. Fatbikes are just fine for “regular MTB” riding, you just sort of get used to the strengths and weaknesses of using a fatbike.
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given Brewtality too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  11. #11
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    You look like you had a great time, and presented quite a challenge to yourself.

    Pretty lucky to have trails like that close enough to enjoy.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Nates are the perfect tire for those sort of terrain conditions. I run mine at around 7psi. Rocks, no problem. Great traction for the downhill loose and off-camber stuff. Just a suggestion to try the next time you ride there. Fatbikes are just fine for “regular MTB” riding, you just sort of get used to the strengths and weaknesses of using a fatbike.
    Mr. Porkstacker, you've hit the nail on the head. I intend to determine for myself what a fat bike is capable of and how far I'm willing to take it. Thus far in "regular MTB" riding as you've stated, it's actually better than my FS Giant. More fun, faster on flats, climbs way easier. I'm not about to huck it though.

    The wife recently heard how much one fat tire costs and said in jest, "you are allowed one tire per year".

    After Seven Summits I picked up two Double Tough MX tubes. The rubber is quite a bit stiffer and a tad thicker than Surly Toobs. I've been running them at 7.5psi this week on the local trails, some a little rocky, mostly smooth hardpack. I don't fret over the round river rock poking out of the ground. It's that damn jagged basalt we have all over around here that is the concern.

    EDIT: I forgot to mention that my 210lbs and lack of finesse makes me more prone to pinch flats, thus my heightened awareness of them.

    Funny story time:

    Since getting the Moonlander the reactions from random women have been:
    At work in the elevator: "wow those are some badass tires!"
    At work, where it sits in my cubicle: "holy sh!t, look at the size of those tires!"
    On the trail: "wow, those tires are huge!" followed by two women stopping to squeeze them. lol
    On the trail just last night: "look at those tires, oh my gawid!"

    It's hard not to reply with "yeah, you like those?" cuz it sounds too forward.

    Men? No joke, these are exactly the reactions I get:
    Silence. Several guys have looked right at it and then directed their attention elsewhere. I'm not an ego-driven arsehole. Maybe my tires threaten their ALPHA MALE status? lol
    Last night a group of riders saw it in the parking lot. They pointed at the bike and smiled at their friends.
    It's freaking weird!


    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    You look like you had a great time, and presented quite a challenge to yourself.

    Pretty lucky to have trails like that close enough to enjoy.
    Indeed, we are fortunate and we don't take it for granted.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupremeDork View Post
    Mr. Porkstacker, you've hit the nail on the head. I intend to determine for myself what a fat bike is capable of and how far I'm willing to take it. Thus far in "regular MTB" riding as you've stated, it's actually better than my FS Giant. More fun, faster on flats, climbs way easier. I'm not about to huck it though.

    The wife recently heard how much one fat tire costs and said in jest, "you are allowed one tire per year".

    After Seven Summits I picked up two Double Tough MX tubes. The rubber is quite a bit stiffer and a tad thicker than Surly Toobs. I've been running them at 7.5psi this week on the local trails, some a little rocky, mostly smooth hardpack. I don't fret over the round river rock poking out of the ground. It's that damn jagged basalt we have all over around here that is the concern.

    EDIT: I forgot to mention that my 210lbs and lack of finesse makes me more prone to pinch flats, thus my heightened awareness of them.

    Funny story time:

    Since getting the Moonlander the reactions from random women have been:
    At work in the elevator: "wow those are some badass tires!"
    At work, where it sits in my cubicle: "holy sh!t, look at the size of those tires!"
    On the trail: "wow, those tires are huge!" followed by two women stopping to squeeze them. lol
    On the trail just last night: "look at those tires, oh my gawid!"

    It's hard not to reply with "yeah, you like those?" cuz it sounds too forward.

    Men? No joke, these are exactly the reactions I get:
    Silence. Several guys have looked right at it and then directed their attention elsewhere. I'm not an ego-driven arsehole. Maybe my tires threaten their ALPHA MALE status? lol
    Last night a group of riders saw it in the parking lot. They pointed at the bike and smiled at their friends.
    It's freaking weird!




    Indeed, we are fortunate and we don't take it for granted.
    When I ride my pugsley, I get the same reactions. Most people want to ask about and I have no problem letting them take a spin around the trailhead. They love it! The other day I pulled up to my local trail and as I was getting situated and uploading from my car, I heard these two guys go " look at those tires, hes going to be so slow. That's just unnecessary and stupid."

    Well, the look on their faces was priceless as I asked them to move to the left while passing their lycra wearing cross-country riding snobby a$$es. I keep telling myself I need to ride my 26er HT to change things up, but everytime the pug just seems so much more, well, FUN!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangaroo View Post
    When I ride my pugsley, I get the same reactions. Most people want to ask about and I have no problem letting them take a spin around the trailhead. They love it! The other day I pulled up to my local trail and as I was getting situated and uploading from my car, I heard these two guys go " look at those tires, hes going to be so slow. That's just unnecessary and stupid."

    Well, the look on their faces was priceless as I asked them to move to the left while passing their lycra wearing cross-country riding snobby a$$es. I keep telling myself I need to ride my 26er HT to change things up, but everytime the pug just seems so much more, well, FUN!
    Dude, that is priceless!

    Last night when that group of riders were pointing at it I extended the olive branch and offered one of them to take it for a spin. One guy seemed stunned and smiled a bit, rode it, and had nothing to say afterward. Dunno wtf that means. lol

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupremeDork View Post
    Dude, that is priceless!

    Last night when that group of riders were pointing at it I extended the olive branch and offered one of them to take it for a spin. One guy seemed stunned and smiled a bit, rode it, and had nothing to say afterward. Dunno wtf that means. lol
    Some people only like the newest and best technology. They have a hard time believing why anyone wants to ride a fully rigid 36lb bike around, when you can go and get a superlight carbon full suspension. Before I owned a fatbike, I thought suspension was everything and I had my eyes set on building a balls-out softy. Now, I'm thinking all I want are rigid steel frames - and SS too!!! It's crazy. I'll still end up investing in a nice softy one day, but Surly has a way of making you think all this suspension technology is so gimmicky for 99% of us riders. I dunno.

    Fatbiking is just a different way of conquering the mountain.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangaroo View Post
    Some people only like the newest and best technology. They have a hard time believing why anyone wants to ride a fully rigid 36lb bike around, when you can go and get a superlight carbon full suspension. Before I owned a fatbike, I thought suspension was everything and I had my eyes set on building a balls-out softy. Now, I'm thinking all I want are rigid steel frames - and SS too!!! It's crazy. I'll still end up investing in a nice softy one day, but Surly has a way of making you think all this suspension technology is so gimmicky for 99% of us riders. I dunno.

    Fatbiking is just a different way of conquering the mountain.
    Well said. STEEL IS REAL

    Not every ride is a race! I like going fast and beating my personal records, but focusing on being "the best" takes the fun out of riding I believe.

    I also own a Surly Troll. Haven't ridden it enough, but I do love it. It's my touring/commuter rig.

    I understand and appreciate that the advancements in bike tech are necessary to keep the industry alive, but I don't feel the need to buy into it. Besides, there's a part of me that is still sitting on my old steel bikes from childhood.

  17. #17
    Sup
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    Now that looked like a great ride "I like pictures"
    Too bad it didn't snow

    Sj
    I am slow therefore I am

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowerJoe View Post
    Now that looked like a great ride "I like pictures"
    Too bad it didn't snow

    Sj
    It did hail pretty hard for a bit and stuck to shady spots on the trail, so I did get to ride through some ice!

  19. #19
    Saw
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupremeDork View Post
    Funny story time:

    Since getting the Moonlander the reactions from random women have been:
    At work in the elevator: "wow those are some badass tires!"
    At work, where it sits in my cubicle: "holy sh!t, look at the size of those tires!"
    On the trail: "wow, those tires are huge!" followed by two women stopping to squeeze them. lol
    On the trail just last night: "look at those tires, oh my gawid!"

    It's hard not to reply with "yeah, you like those?" cuz it sounds too forward.

    Men? No joke, these are exactly the reactions I get:
    Silence. Several guys have looked right at it and then directed their attention elsewhere. I'm not an ego-driven arsehole. Maybe my tires threaten their ALPHA MALE status? lol
    Last night a group of riders saw it in the parking lot. They pointed at the bike and smiled at their friends.
    It's freaking weird!
    I had a similar experience the other night when I went riding with a local bike club on an urban night ride. I roll up on my fat bike and it was mostly the ladies who were making comments and asking questions. I asked if anyone wanted to take the bike for a spin around the parking lot and only had two takers, both women. The only negative reaction I've gotten about the fat bike was from an alpha male type. When men question me about the bike there is often a nervous hesitancy on their part, as though I were standing at a urinal or something.
    Last edited by Saw; 09-17-2012 at 11:57 AM.

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