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  1. #1
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    From 3.8 to 4.7" rubber, is it worth the price?

    Hi guys.
    I'm riding in Southern Ontario winter, hard pack snow, some powder on top, nothing deeper than 3inches.

    Currently riding Muk with nates (3.8") around 6PSI front, 7PSI rear.

    I've been finding that if I veer off the hard packed trail my front end washes out a bit on the downs. Would a 4.7" tire (or there abouts) improve the grip levels enough to justify spending a max of $200 CAD?

    Open to suggestions on tire choice, or maybe pressure settings on the nates. I actually like the nates a lot (reversed the back tire) and I find they corner well.
    Thanks for the feedback.

  2. #2
    .44
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    You're riding way too high pressures. Take it down to 1 to 3 psi. You'll think it's flat sitting on your bike. But that's what it takes to ride the deeper stuff.

    For what you describe, all 5" tires are going to do is slow you down. Keep your set up. Go tubeless, if you haven't already.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the advice, I'll try that for sure.
    The setups is tubeless, forgot to mention that in my previous post.

  4. #4
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    I ran nates for a couple years, great tire, just rolls a bit hard. I went to D5's for winter, mostly because I needed the studs. Nate is a great tire IMO...........all year long

  5. #5
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    Riding in Southern Ont as well! Using 3.8 x27.5 Hodags. I've ridden other bikes with 5" tires. It does not matter 1 bit if you go off the hard pack you'll still wash with 5" tires. They are as already stated way slower. The 1-3 psi works great if you are breaking trail in powder. On the trail it will slow you down and make cornering no fun. I installed grip studs this year and will never ride another winter without them.

  6. #6
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    Flowbeist is a great front tire if you're looking for something larger, tracks great and doesn't wash out in the soft stuff. I've found it to be a great performer on narrow snowshoe trails that are only lightly packed down.
    '07 Spec Enduro
    '14 Salsa Mukluk 2
    '16 Salsa Bucksaw GX1

  7. #7
    wjh
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    There is no better front tire than a surly bud. I found a like new one used for $100. It can still washout as stated above but is way better than a nate on the front. It is well worth it

  8. #8
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    I ran Nate rear Bud front on my Mukluk last winter in Ontario too. This year I went to a Vanhelga rear and Flowbeist upfront. Good combo.... but I'm thinking that studs might be in order next year. We get so many mild days where the trail ices up.

  9. #9
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    Another thing to consider is weight.

    I run Bud and Lou on Clownshoes but I weigh nearly 250 lbs. geared up.

    IME skinny fat tires just don't cut it for Clydes on deeper, ungroomed snow.

  10. #10
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    I rode Nate - Nate last year, swapping to Nate - Lou mid winter (my rear Nate was worn out from riding all summer), and I'm riding Bud - Lou this year. On hard pack like you described, the Nates should be fine. Drop pressure like was suggested. Definitely less than 4 pounds, you could go lower depending on how hard packed the snow is, and whether you except to occasionally hit frozen dirt.

    The Bud - Lou combination is definitely better. The Bud tracks much better, and the extra width on both tires adds more float and more traction, but for what you described, I wouldn't run out and buy them. Given the number of frozen dirt days we've been mixing in this winter, I'm not sure that I would buy them again over Nates, but when we get 6" of fresh powder and I am out there breaking in fresh trails, the Bud and Lou combination makes a huge difference.

  11. #11
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    Appreciate all the feedback guys.
    Thanks for the input and for the comments on different combos you've tried. Nice to see a few locals from Southern Ontario with similar experience.

    Next time I'm out I'll be dropping the pressure for sure (just got a low tire gauge, that should help, found out I was running closer to 9PSI both sides). Should make a difference going down to 5-4ish PSI.

    I'm also 200 pounds so the weight factor may also impact how the ride is, I'll give these things a go and let you know how it lands on my next ride.

    Please keep the comments coming.

  12. #12
    Jammin' Econo
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfisher11 View Post
    Next time I'm out I'll be dropping the pressure for sure (just got a low tire gauge, that should help, found out I was running closer to 9PSI both sides). Should make a difference going down to 5-4ish PSI.
    That's a YUGE difference, in fat bike terms. I think you'll be amazed at what a difference it can make.

    Now get out there and have fun!
    I dream of a day when my children will live in a world without the shackles of cause and effect.” - S. Colbert

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    That's a YUGE difference, in fat bike terms. I think you'll be amazed at what a difference it can make.

    Now get out there and have fun!
    Agreed. Getting the psi down until you get a little sidewall crinkle makes a difference. I didn't do that for the longest time and worked harder for less fun as a result.

    First major snowfall of the winter here in SE Pennsylvania today. Had the Bud/Lou on Clownshoes aired down to between 3-4 psi and was floating through 7"-8" of fairly heavy, wet nongroomed snow just fine despite being 250lbs. geared up.

  14. #14
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    Quick update on this thread.
    Went out today with a couple of friends, had the pressure on the nates down to 4 front, 5 rear. HUGE difference like you all said.
    Trails were half groomed with 2" on top, others trails were fresh powder sitting about 4" which we blazed through. Hardly washed out at all, awesome cornering as well. Only time I was slipping with when we hit the odd patch of ice.

    Thanks again for the advice!

  15. #15
    .44
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    Good to hear. If the snow gets softer or deeper than that, drop it below 2 psi. You'll be amazed what you can ride.

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