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  1. #1
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    26" fat or 29er chubby for everyday ride?

    I've ridden a 26 fat bike on snowshoe trails in Alaska and it was amazing, to say the least. Now I'm seeing more and more people on regular single track and this is hitting right when I'm ready for a new everyday bike and I've decided to go this route.

    I'm tall and big. 6'4" 250lbs and have been riding 29er for a long time. Do I go with a Krampus to keep my 29er roll and height and lose some of the fatness? Or take full advantage of the function of the fat and get a 26"? I like the specs of the upcoming Specialized Fatboy! but many others are a consideration.

    I'll use the bike to ride with the family on local trails, take it to the foothill single track and I live in the desert so I'd see it would be a huge advantage to take off on some long desert (sandy) rides.

  2. #2
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    Go wide
    a 26" fattire is the same diameter as a regular 29er.

    You have the option to build up krampus wheels & fit em into a 26" fat frame as well so keep that in mind.
    Riding.....

  3. #3
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    For trail riding if I had to choose between my Krampus and Pug I would take the Krampus every time.

    You can build up a 2nd set of 29+ wheels for your fat bike, but it will cost a fair bit...say $750 and you don't get the Krampus' great handling.

    I'm glad I have both and I don't regret buying a Krampus rather than just building up a second wheelset for the Pug.

    As much as I am loving the Krampus it's a chubby 29er not a skinny fatbike. You will get some extra float compared to a 2.4" 29er tire, but nothing like a 4" fatbike tire not to mention a 5" fatbike tire.

    If trail riding is 80%+ of what you are going to do I'd get the Krampus.

    If you want to ride sand a lot get the fatbike.

    If you are hitting a 50/50 mix get a fatbike and think about a 29+ wheelset if you can stomach the $$.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  4. #4
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    Hey;

    6'5"/240 here. Full fat. It is the most versatile bicycle platform available, period. Once you get used to them, they trail ride just fine, and I'm having a BLAST! It's a great bike, and was a dream come true at the time (the first bike that ever fit me!), but I don't ride my Niner much any more. I do not have any Krampus experience (they do interest me), but I'm betting whatever gains in handling they may offer cannot overcome the inherent ability of the Fatty to deal with whatever you throw at it. I am interested in building a set of Krampus wheels for my Fatties, just to see, but I doubt they will hold the same appeal for me. The cushion of a full fat tire on a rigid frame is at the point that I can ride it pretty damn hard and not suffer the physical consequences. I am not confident that the 3" tire will hit that balance, and may actually be limiting for me.

    As to size, I build my own frames to fit. However, I patterned them fairly closely after the XL Salsa Mukluk, which is surprisingly close to my RIP9 in many respects. Depending on your proportions, I'm betting an XL Muk (or similar) will suit you just fine.

    I say Go Big, Big Guy!
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  5. #5
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    How about both at pretty good price?

    26" fat or 29er chubby for everyday ride?-cboofatx5_p1.jpg

    26" fat or 29er chubby for everyday ride?-ybsh288199_p1.jpg

    I did just that, and boy what a great set of fatbike and 29er in 1

  6. #6
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    If one bike only go full fat! You can do everything on a fat bike that you are looking to do and not so on the Krampus. I did ride a Krampus and imho I wasn't impressed, people complain about 29ers being sluggish and not playful well the Krampus seemed even worse with the extra added tire height (seemed way taller than a 29er). In the bikes defense it was set up stock and not to my likings so that could've been part of the problem. A bike that isn't setup properly for an individual can lead to a very negative riding experience and I am exceptionally picky. I don't usually waste anyones time test riding but I wanted to feel what the hype was with the Krampus.
    Last edited by bdundee; 07-18-2013 at 09:11 AM.
    And I love beer!!

  7. #7
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    For a good assessment of how the Krampus handles on trails I'd suggest reading this thread as there are lots of different riders chiming in:

    Surly Krampus

    If you go fat and build up a second wheelset. I would strongly recommend building it with Knard friendly Rabbit Hole or P35 rims. The 3" - 29+ tires rock and since the wheelset will be custom and spendy you might as well get something that will work with them well.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  8. #8
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    26" fat or 29er chubby for everyday ride?

    Go fat. It's a much more versatile bike, I'd say Moonlander, but if you are interested in a possible 29er wheel set for it, it doesn't work as well with the large Moonlander offset. I have both fat and normal 29er bikes, and since getting the Moonlander, I've been riding mostly just that on our rocky, rooty singletrack in central New York.

  9. #9
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    Remember that the Knard (Krampus tire) is available in a 26x3.8" version. I have a pair and can attest that they roll fast, especially at high pressure. Go full fat: it can go where the chubby can't, but not vice versa.

  10. #10
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    Re: 26" fat or 29er chubby for everyday ride?

    Get a fattie if you ride a lot of sand or snow. Keep your 29er and ride both. If you love the fattie so much for all your trail riding, then get rid of the 29er. Many people on these forums will tell you the fattie is an all around bike and it can be, but the majority of fat riders use them for specific riding like snow or sand. Many people ride fatties in the winter in MN and they are a total blast in the snow, but most riders here only ride them in snow and ride a regular mtn bike in the summer. If fatties were so awesome for everything, then our summer trails would be full of them, but in reality everyone puts them away when the snow melts. To each his own, but I recommend keeping your 29er until you know for sure a fattie is what you want for all your riding needs.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2

  11. #11
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    It's going to be a tough decision if you aren't enamored with one bike. I ride fat all the time. Getting the Lefty front transformed the bike for me. I ride pavement (when I have to), gravel roads, fire roads, trails and singletrack on the same bike. The only issue I have is the gearing on gravel and pavement. I love the Fatback for it's handling, comfort and sheer awesomeness. Could it be a little more nimble? Maybe, but the rider has a lot to do with that. Could it roll faster? Yes, but Floyds aren't cheap and the Vee Rubbers just don't work for me. Could I build a 29er wheelset? Yep, but $$$ make me use what I have. As RYNOFREERIDE stated, keep the 29er until you're certain that's what you want. I do and ride the Fatback everywhere.
    Steel Fatback

  12. #12
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    I say go fully Fat. Since I got my Mukluk 3, I struggle to even think of riding anything else. My poor Ritchey P29er with XTR build is just sitting in the corner of the garage looking at me as I pass each time to grab the fatty The Ritchey may be light and fast, but the Fatty gives me so much more on every ride. I ride road to the beach, single track and fire roads in our local forests and am only marginally slower on the fatty. My fun factor has increased massively though I still cannot believe how much extra traction there is climbing and cornering on the fatty.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    I've ridden a 26 fat bike on snowshoe trails in Alaska and it was amazing, to say the least. Now I'm seeing more and more people on regular single track and this is hitting right when I'm ready for a new everyday bike and I've decided to go this route.

    I'm tall and big. 6'4" 250lbs and have been riding 29er for a long time. Do I go with a Krampus to keep my 29er roll and height and lose some of the fatness? Or take full advantage of the function of the fat and get a 26"? I like the specs of the upcoming Specialized Fatboy! but many others are a consideration.

    I'll use the bike to ride with the family on local trails, take it to the foothill single track and I live in the desert so I'd see it would be a huge advantage to take off on some long desert (sandy) rides.
    Go Fat, it offers more adaptability. I'm 6'8 & 260 and ride a 22" Pugsley. I've played around with the wheels quite a bit and love the versatility: Full Fat for snow, mud/damp conditions and rocky, root-y loose situations. 1/2 fat (fat front, 29er rear) for XC riding, rigid 29er (29er rear wheels, front and back) for smooth, flowing trails and urban riding. At some point, I will get a set of RH/Knards and may even experiment with a 1/2 fat setup with a sus. fork up front and fat tire in back, just for kicks. Since I've gotten my Pug, my 29er barely gets ridden.
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  14. #14
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    I suggest you ask the same question on the krampus thread in the 29er form, get answers from a different crowd, just for the heck of it. I've been on a fat for a season, lots of single track, varied terrain. I've spent 3 days on a krampus and my impression is that the 29+ with a suspension fork would be the sweet spot for dry trails for me. Pretty personal though, definitely not a right answer to this good question.

  15. #15
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    The OP says he wants to try out sand riding so it's pretty simple a Krampus is not for sand.
    And I love beer!!

  16. #16
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    Definitely, no comparison in the float department. All bikes are a compromise.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee View Post
    The OP says he wants to try out sand riding so it's pretty simple a Krampus is not for sand.
    Fluffy soft beach sand is not going to work on a Krampus. Firmer sand in the desert might be just fine. It depends on the specific conditions. When I ride in UT and AZ my normal MTB with wider 2.4" rubber copes much better with sandy sections on trails than skinny 2.2" - 2.3" rubber on other bikes. The Krampus would be another level of improvement over my MTB.

    It could be that he needs 100m rims and 5" tires to make things work in the desert which could rule out some fatbike options as unsuitable.

    It also depends how the rides will breakdown. I wouldn't optimize my bike choice for 5% percent of my rides. I would optimize them for the other 80%.

    The OP has to adjust his expectations and selection criteria based on the local knowledge that he has.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Fluffy soft beach sand is not going to work on a Krampus. Firmer sand in the desert might be just fine. It depends on the specific conditions. When I ride in UT and AZ my normal MTB with wider 2.4" rubber copes much better with sandy sections on trails than skinny 2.2" - 2.3" rubber on other bikes. The Krampus would be another level of improvement over my MTB.


    It could be that he needs 100m rims and 5" tires to make things work in the desert which could rule out some fatbike options as unsuitable.

    It also depends how the rides will breakdown. I wouldn't optimize my bike choice for 5% percent of my rides. I would optimize them for the other 80%.

    The OP has to adjust his expectations and selection criteria based on the local knowledge that he has.
    And this is why our quivers must overflow with trusty steeds of multiple varieties!!
    And I love beer!!

  19. #19
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    fat

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