Page 1 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 282
  1. #1
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    815

    2015 Iditarod Trail Invidational / Iditasport

    I thought I'd start a thread for anyone who wants to discuss the ITI or the Iditasport. To get things going here is my current gear layout and packing list...

    On bike
    1. Computer (Planet Bike)
    2. GPS (Garmin eTrex 30)
    3. Tools (PrestaCycle Bicycle Bit Set, Bit set Wrench; Patch kit; misc box; spoke tools, Stein cassette removal tool, small vice grip, eye dropper filled with wet chain lube; zip ties, extra bolts, two quicklinks)
    4. CO2 Cartridges (2)
    5. Frame Bag (Homemade)
    6. Tank Bag (Revelat)
    7. Pump (Lezyne)
    8. Spare Inner tube (Q-Tube lite)
    9. Sleeping Bag (The North Face Inferno -20 Degree Down Sleeping Bag)
    10. Sleeping Pad (Big Agnes Q-Core SL Sleeping Pad Long large)
    11. Cooking kit (MSR wisperlite (incl tool pack); pump, Pot/cup, fuel cell)
    12. Fuel (White)
    13. Chemical Warming (8 pr. warmers)
    14. Food (10,000 calories (4 lunches (dehydrated), 2 stick of butter (dehydrated); 3,000 calories of Cashews, M&Ms); 8 oz Olive Oil)
    15. Beverages (Instant coffee and gatorade)
    16. Compression sack (Sea to Summit eVent Compression Dry Sack)
    17. Over pants (Patagonia DAS Insulated Pant - Men's)
    18. Down Jacket (Outdoor Research Floodlight Down Jacket )
    19. Light puffy jacket (Mountain hardware jacket)
    20. Personal Pack 1 (2 pair socks (wool and inner) and bread bag; duck tape)
    21. Personal pack 2 (Medicine, tooth brush, etc)
    22. Poagies (Homemade)
    23. Spare Spokes (4 front and 4 rear)


    On Me:
    1. Mitts (Absolute Zero)
    2. Boots (Wolvhammers)
    3. Head lamp
    4. Gaiters (45Nrth)
    5. Neoprene shoe covers (Boot Glove)
    6. Face mask (X2)
    7. Goggles (still sorting this out)
    8. Pants (Craft - Storm Tights, LG)
    9. Camelbak (Camelbak and Bladder)
    10. Wool shirt
    11. Vest
    12. Ear warmer
    13. Chamois
    14. Shell Jacket
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2015 Iditarod Trail Invidational / Iditasport-20150108_085344.jpg  

    --Peace

  2. #2
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,108
    I've always brought a light weight, spare base layer and riding shorts on my multiday races/rides. I had to quick change into one of them when my hydration pack leaked most of it's contents on me at -10 once. When I had to ride at -45, wearing both base layers was nice. If it's longer than two days, a second pair of shorts to change into is worth it.

  3. #3
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    7,332
    I'm a fan of rear racks for winter multi day stuff. Were I in your shoes, I'd work on getting the mass of your load lower--partially by moving the rack platform closer to the tire, partially by transferring some of the mass to the sides of the rack. I wouldn't go so far as panniers, but a light stuff sack holding a light puffy on one side, and something of similar size/weight on the other side will not only help lower the CoG of your load, it'll make those two items easier to access.

  4. #4
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,108
    Also, regarding your tools:

    Take the bit set out into the snow, remove all the bits, drop them into the snow then try to find them. A simple, integrated multitool that fits all the bolts and screws on your bike is much simpler and easier to use with cold hands. It's also easier to find when you drop it in soft snow in the dark. I can't see a need for a cassette remover tool, and I would replace the small vice grip with a folding, leatherman style multitool. I have occasionally needed to use pliers, and multitool pliers were always more than sufficient. I've also needed a pocket knife and used the saw on a multitool during the ITI.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    236
    I heart winter Ultra-season!! Reading about how all you maniacs kit up for this stuff and then keeping tabs on the racing and results is such a stoke!!! I've also gleaned heaps of tech help in these threads. Cheers to all the riders and racers this season...good luck!!!

  6. #6
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    815
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach View Post
    Also, regarding your tools:

    Take the bit set out into the snow, remove all the bits, drop them into the snow then try to find them.
    I laughed aloud when I read that. Thanks for the good advice. Better to laugh now than cry later.
    --Peace

  7. #7
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    7,332
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach View Post
    Also, regarding your tools:

    Take the bit set out into the snow, remove all the bits, drop them into the snow then try to find them. A simple, integrated multitool that fits all the bolts and screws on your bike is much simpler and easier to use with cold hands. It's also easier to find when you drop it in soft snow in the dark. I can't see a need for a cassette remover tool, and I would replace the small vice grip with a folding, leatherman style multitool. I have occasionally needed to use pliers, and multitool pliers were always more than sufficient. I've also needed a pocket knife and used the saw on a multitool during the ITI.
    Great advice!

    Every trip up the Idita in the last ~decade has been with only these two tools: The Crank Brothers M19 and a mini-Leatherman of some sort.

    Before that I don't remember what I carried.

    Thoughts on the rest of your list, Lars:
    -Are CO2 cartridges even effective in the cold? Will your hand/glove freeze to it?
    -I love the idea of having spare spokes for both wheels, but are you really going to sit in the snow and replace one, or more, if needed? I'm thankful I haven't had to cross that bridge on that trail, but I wonder if I even could? Betting your fork has enough clearance for the wheel/tire to fit through even if a spoke breaks. If so (test it!) I'd just ride it out rather than worry about keeping track of 4 rattling spokes.
    -If you're tubeless, take 2 tubes.

  8. #8
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    815
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Great advice!

    Every trip up the Idita in the last ~decade has been with only these two tools: The Crank Brothers M19 and a mini-Leatherman of some sort.

    Before that I don't remember what I carried.

    Thoughts on the rest of your list, Lars:
    -Are CO2 cartridges even effective in the cold? Will your hand/glove freeze to it?
    -I love the idea of having spare spokes for both wheels, but are you really going to sit in the snow and replace one, or more, if needed? I'm thankful I haven't had to cross that bridge on that trail, but I wonder if I even could? Betting your fork has enough clearance for the wheel/tire to fit through even if a spoke breaks. If so (test it!) I'd just ride it out rather than worry about keeping track of 4 rattling spokes.
    -If you're tubeless, take 2 tubes.
    Thanks, Mike. I think I will ditch the front spare spokes--you're right, plenty of clearance with that fork. Rear is a somewhat closer fit so I'll probably keep those--If you look closely you can see that I have the spare spokes taped to the rack legs. I did test a C02 cartridge at about 10F last winter and it seemed to work okay.
    --Peace

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    71
    [QUOTE=mikesee;11688848]

    -Are CO2 cartridges even effective in the cold? Will your hand/glove freeze to it?

    Sometimes, but they've also been useless a few times when it's below zero. Not sure they are worth the space for the minimal time you might actually use them. They are SUPER cold on your fingers.

  10. #10
    Muskoka
    Reputation: BlackCanoeDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    3,042
    How do you guys keep a hydration pac/tube/mouthpiece from freezing at those temperatures!!?
    http://picasaweb.google.com/BlackCanoeDog
    2011 Rocky Mountain Altitude 70 RSL
    2015 RSD Mayor...loves the white stuff!

  11. #11
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    815
    [QUOTE=TBerntson;11688988]
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post

    -Are CO2 cartridges even effective in the cold? Will your hand/glove freeze to it?

    Sometimes, but they've also been useless a few times when it's below zero. Not sure they are worth the space for the minimal time you might actually use them. They are SUPER cold on your fingers.
    Okay, I am convinced, no CO2.
    --Peace

  12. #12
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,108
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCanoeDog View Post
    How do you guys keep a hydration pac/tube/mouthpiece from freezing at those temperatures!!?
    All sorts of ways. 60% of the time, they work every time. Under layers and blowing back works most of the time. Hydro Heater is bulky but does well for keeping it from freezing and works better than anything else for thawing once it does freeze. Nalgenes in bottle cozies work well, but they can still freeze and you pretty much have to stop riding to drink out of them.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    282
    What about fiber flex spokes instead of standard spokes? Then you can use them front or rear and can maybe get them installed on the drive side of the rear wheel without a cassette tool. Caveat to that last part; I have tested my ability to install them on my touring bike at 60F...it might be fun in the cold.

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,691
    How do you keep your feet dry day after day with boots like the wolfhammers?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,260
    Bivy sack?

  16. #16
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,108
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    How do you keep your feet dry day after day with boots like the wolfhammers?
    You don't. You could air them out frequently, but it's going to be a losing battle. The best I've done for keeping my feet dry was eVent trail running shoes one size too big, with Neos for when it got really cold or I had to go through water/overflow.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    117
    VBL socks?

  18. #18
    addicted to chunk
    Reputation: Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,547
    To those that are doing this, good luck & you are awesome!!

    I agree with the leatherman suggestion. I always have one stashed in the bottom of my backpack. It's not used often, but the times I needed it, saved me from a long walk out of the woods.
    I had a rear derailleur cable snap right at the end where it leaves the housing & gets attached to the RD bolt.
    I was able to use my leatherman to cut the housing shorter and get enough slack back out to get it working again.
    The more you ride, the easier it gets........
    the easier it gets, the more you ride.
    Viscous circle

  19. #19
    Anchorage, AK
    Reputation: Lars_D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    815
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Bivy sack?
    For the ITI, I will only bring a bivy if rain seems likely--and frankly, I'd probably carry a light tent instead. Anther weather dependent option is snowshoes in case of expected very heavy snow. (For the Iditasport bivys are mandatory, as are SPOT trackers.)
    Last edited by Lars_D; 01-10-2015 at 10:20 AM.
    --Peace

  20. #20
    aka bOb
    Reputation: bdundee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    5,787
    Good thread!!
    And I love beer!!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Lars_D View Post
    I will only bring a bivy if rain seems likely--and frankly, I'd probably carry a light tent instead. Anther weather dependent option is snowshoes in case of expected very heavy snow.
    Pushing a bike with snowshoes does not sound like fun. At that point you're better off grabbing a sled and leaving the bike. Seriously though, I don't think pushing, or pulling, a bike with snowshoes on will work real well. May want to try that out before bringing them.

  22. #22
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,066
    Snowshoeing while pushing a bike isn't that bad. Kind of surprising that I feel I can contribute anything here! I snowshoe with a bike all the time. Without my fat ass on the bike, even with bags, it stays on top of the snow decently enough. It then just becomes a question of walking next to your bike with snowshoes on. So my question, is this really an option for you guys?
    I guide and rent bikes in Northern Utah

    http://www.facebook.com/AdventureEarthRides

  23. #23
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,108
    It would have to be exceptionally terrible conditions to warrant carrying the extra weight of snowshoes. 2009 and 2012 they would have come in handy. Both years the race got hammered with big snowfalls in the first 200 miles and during the first day of the race, ie: there was no trail for very long portions.

  24. #24
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,691
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach View Post
    You don't. You could air them out frequently, but it's going to be a losing battle. The best I've done for keeping my feet dry was eVent trail running shoes one size too big, with Neos for when it got really cold or I had to go through water/overflow.
    Hmm, I'm mostly concerned about my toes getting cold and not being able to recover them (with my poor circulation). The shoes would get pretty wet if being used day after day I'd imagine, unless there's some way with fire to dry them out?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    204
    I was just about to start one of these myself... Looks like a pretty solid setup Lars. I've got my list almost finalized. Do you plan on having and drop bags or are you gonna go without?

    I'll get my lists together and post them up here in the next day or so.

Page 1 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New Iditarod Trail Invitational Record!!!
    By AKCheesehead in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 03-14-2014, 11:05 AM
  2. Iditarod Trail Invitational
    By mtbxplorer in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-24-2013, 05:26 PM
  3. Iditarod Trail Invitational
    By sryanak in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-02-2011, 11:16 AM
  4. Iditarod Trail Invitational 2011
    By juxtaposition in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-01-2011, 12:56 PM
  5. Mountain Biking Iditarod Trail?
    By stumpbumper in forum Alaska
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-21-2011, 03:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •